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Behind the numbers: Religious 'nones' may not be who you think they are - Religion News Service

Behind the numbers: Religious 'nones' may not be who you think they are - Religion News Service | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
The number of people who claim no religious brand is climbing the statistical ranks, but these "nones" may not be who you think they are.
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Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
Our brains have many glitches that interfere with honest self-awareness and accurate self-assessment
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How America became the most powerful country on Earth, in 11 maps

We take it for granted that the United States is the most powerful country on Earth today, and perhaps in human history. The story of how that came to be is long, fascinating, complex — and often misunderstood. Here, excerpted in part from "70 maps that explain America," are maps that help show some of the key moments and forces that contributed to the US's rise as sole global superpower.
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The media is getting better at fact-checking climate deniers — but still not great

The American politico-media complex is in a bit of an awkward phase on the subject of climate change. By now, virtually everyone acknowledges it's a problem that calls for policy solutions — everyone, that is, except the hardcore base of the Republican Party and, oh yeah, all the Republican presidential candidates (except, uh, Lindsey Graham).

Mainstream political journalists are generally educated cosmopolitans who accept the scientific consensus. Yet their jobs regularly bring them into contact with, and require them to write about, these politicians who reject it. How should they deal with that?

Back in March, I wrote a post about that very subject. It keyed off media analyst Jay Rosen, who asked how campaign journalists planned to address the climate denialism of GOP presidential candidates in the 2016 race.

Rosen offered four possible options:

Normalize it: Treat denialist claims like any other campaign position.
Savvy analysis: Is denialism a winning move or is it costing the candidate?
Persistence: Call what it is — a rejection of the science — and keep calling it that.
Confrontation: Try to raise the costs of denialism.
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Golden Ratio Enthusiasts: Phi Fantasies

Golden Ratio Enthusiasts: Phi Fantasies | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Introduction
We crave deep meaning and connection. What is so bad about that? Special vibrant meaning can stir warm feelings and awe in us.
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Do Happiness Practices Work?

Do Happiness Practices Work? | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Our Science of Happiness course boosted happiness levels in students from all over the world. But did the homework we assigned—11 different happiness exercises drawn from published research studies—have anything to do with that result?
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Challenge to Traditional Theories About How the Brain Processes Actions

According to a new study, the brain plans multiple actions simultaneously prior to selecting one action to execute.
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Dumbing Down of America Will Soon Allow Climate Deniers to Sell Fabricated Facts Like This

Dumbing Down of America Will Soon Allow Climate Deniers to Sell Fabricated Facts Like This | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
This would be hilarious if it weren’t so terrifying. It won’t be long before this sort of “reporting” will be able to be passed off as the real thing. Watch.
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One paragraph that perfectly explains patriotism

July 4th is about patriotism, which — realistically speaking — means barbecues and explosions. But there's also the actual "love of country" thing, which a lot of people take to mean blind faith in your country's awesomeness.
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Remembering Our Nation’s Failings Is True Patriotism

Remembering Our Nation’s Failings Is True Patriotism | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Remember that the patriot does not shy from history, but learns from it.
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If Mexicans celebrated the 4th like Americans celebrate Cinco de...

If Mexicans celebrated the 4th like Americans celebrate Cinco de Mayo… 
More from Flama here.
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The cult of my childhood: Across three continents, life was a whirlwind of uncertainty

The cult of my childhood: Across three continents, life was a whirlwind of uncertainty | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Japan was the worst, for me. Returning 25 years later, with my kids, helped me overwrite the past and set me free
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A checklist for efficient competitive intelligence

A checklist for efficient competitive intelligence | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

 

As a competitive intelligence manager, you’ve probably grappled with multiple challenges over the years. Common challenges include, how do we develop our company’s internal competitive intelligence network; how can we gain insights in a broad range of specialized topics; how do we share market signals with key stakeholders effectively; how can we maximize the output from internal resources, and more. These are questions we help our clients address with the Intelligence Plaza all the time. here is a quick 10 point checklist for an efficient and trusted competitive intelligence program:


Via Bonnie Hohhof, Ismo Kuhanen, Ines Bieler, Gust MEES
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metsepsis's comment, July 3, 2:49 AM
Remarkable...!!
Gust MEES's curator insight, July 4, 11:17 AM

As a competitive intelligence manager, you’ve probably grappled with multiple challenges over the years. Common challenges include, how do we develop our company’s internal competitive intelligence network; how can we gain insights in a broad range of specialized topics; how do we share market signals with key stakeholders effectively; how can we maximize the output from internal resources, and more. These are questions we help our clients address with the Intelligence Plaza all the time. here is a quick 10 point checklist for an efficient and trusted competitive intelligence program:


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A systematic review of mechanisms of change in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in the treatment of recurrent major depressive disorder

A systematic review of mechanisms of change in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in the treatment of recurrent major depressive disorder | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

(Available in free full text) Background The investigation of treatment mechanisms in randomized controlled trials has considerable clinical and theoretical relevance. Despite the empirical support for the effect of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in the treatment of recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD), the specific mechanisms by which MBCT leads to therapeutic change remain unclear. Objective By means of a systematic review we evaluate how the field is progressing in its empirical investigation of mechanisms of change in MBCT for recurrent MDD. Method To identify relevant studies, a systematic search was conducted. Studies were coded and ranked for quality. Results The search produced 476 articles, of which 23 were included. In line with the theoretical premise, 12 studies found that alterations in mindfulness, rumination, worry, compassion, or meta-awareness were associated with, predicted or mediated MBCT's effect on treatment outcome. In addition, preliminary studies indicated that alterations in attention, memory specificity, self-discrepancy, emotional reactivity and momentary positive and negative affect might play a role in how MBCT exerts its clinical effects. Conclusion The results suggest that MBCT could work through some of the MBCT model's theoretically predicted mechanisms. However, there is a need for more rigorous designs that can assess greater levels of causal specificity.


Via Dr James Hawkins
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What makes a good horror movie?

What makes a good horror movie? | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Like them or hate them horror films are big business and a string of new horror films are hitting the big screen this year. But what creates the intensity of suspense? And was Alfred Hitchcock – the master of suspense - right?
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Southern whites who know basic facts about the Civil War don’t support the Confederate flag

Supporters of displaying the Confederate battle flag in public places like South Carolina's state house often argue that it's about "heritage, not hate." But as political scientists Spencer Piston and Logan Strother write for the Washington Post's Monkey Cage blog, there is actual data measuring how Confederate flag supporters and opponents each feel about the South and its history. And, frankly, it doesn't look good for the "heritage, not hate" argument.

In 2004, the Survey Research Laboratory at Georgia State University surveyed 522 white Georgia residents about a version of the Georgia state flag that included the Confederate battle flag. (This was the official Georgia state flag until 2001; in 2004, there was a referendum in which Georgia voters could vote for it to be reinstated.) And they found Confederate flag supporters didn't know much about the actual Confederacy.
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Zimbardo on Milgram and Obedience - Part II

Zimbardo on Milgram and Obedience - Part II | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Situationist Contributer Philip Zimbardo has authored the preface to a new edition of social psychologist Stanley Milgram’s seminal book Obedience to Authority. This is the second of a two-part series derived from that preface. In Part I of the post, Zimbardo describes the inculcation of obedience and Milgram’s role as a research pioneer. In this part, Zimbardo answers challenges to Milgram’s work and locates its legacy.

* * *

Unfortunately, many psychologists, students, and lay people who believe that they know the “Milgram Shock” study, know only one version of it, most likely from seeing his influential movie Obedience or reading a textbook summary.

He has been challenged for using only male participants, which was true initially, but later he replicated his findings with females. He has been challenged for relying only on Yale students, because the first studies were conducted at Yale University. However, the Milgram obedience research covers nineteen separate experimental versions, involving about a thousand participants, ages twenty to fifty, of whom none are college or high school students! His research has been heavily criticized for being unethical by creating a situation that generated much distress for the person playing the role of the teacher believing his shocks were causing suffering to the person in the role of the learner. I believe that it was seeing his movie, in which he includes scenes of distress and indecision among his participants, that fostered the initial impetus for concern about the ethics of his research. Reading his research articles or his book does not convey as vividly the stress of participants who continued to obey authority despite the apparent suffering they were causing their innocent victims. I raise this issue not to argue for or against the ethicality of this research, but rather to raise the issue that it is still critical to read the original presentations of his ideas, methods, results, and discussions to understand fully what he did. That is another virtue of this collection of Milgram’s obedience research.

A few words about how I view this body of research. First, it is the most representative and generalizable research in social psychology or social sciences due to his large sample size, systematic variations, use of a diverse body of ordinary people from two small towns—New Haven and Bridgeport, Connecticut—and detailed presentation of methodological features. Further, its replications across many cultures and time periods reveal its robust effectiveness.

As the most significant demonstration of the power of social situations to influence human behavior, Milgram’s experiments are at the core of the situationist view of behavioral determinants. It is a study of the failure of most people to resist unjust authority when commands no longer make sense given the seemingly reasonable stated intentions of the just authority who began the study. It makes sense that psychological researchers would care about the judicious use of punishment as a means to improve learning and memory. However, it makes no sense to continue to administer increasingly painful shocks to one’s learner after he insists on quitting, complains of a heart condition, and then, after 330 volts, stops responding at all. How could you be helping improve his memory when he was unconscious or worse? The most minimal exercise of critical thinking at that stage in the series should have resulted in virtually everyone refusing to go on, disobeying this now heartlessly unjust authority. To the contrary, most who had gone that far were trapped in what Milgram calls the “agentic state.”
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About that Controversial New Yorker Article on Climate Change by a Famous Novelist

About that Controversial New Yorker Article on Climate Change by a Famous Novelist | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
If you follow climate and environmental discourse as closely as I do, then you know that the recent New Yorker piece by the acclaimed novelist Jonathan Franzen has triggered 1) applause, 2) denunciation, 3) head-scratching.
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Politics may interfere with science — but that doesn't mean all science ... - Washington Post

Politics may interfere with science — but that doesn't mean all science ... - Washington Post | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
The reasons why people resist science are a lot more diverse than you might think.
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The NeuroBusiness 2015 Conference

The NeuroBusiness 2015 Conference | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Last week there was a conference in Manchester titled NeuroBusiness 2015,  billed as the ‘first of its kind in the UK’. Actually the ‘neuroleadership‘ guys have been doing similar stuff for ages.
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What's the Best Way to Understand the World?

What's the Best Way to Understand the World? | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Mario Anzuoni / Reuters What mindset best helps humans to attain true understanding? This week, I’m sharing responses to the question, “What insight or idea has thrilled or excited you?
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Colorblind Artist Neil Harbisson 'Hears' Color With Wearable Technology Implanted In Skull

Colorblind Artist Neil Harbisson 'Hears' Color With Wearable Technology Implanted In Skull | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Colorblind artist Neil Harbisson has been claimed to be the first recognized cyborg in the world after being able to listen to color, even in his dreams.
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Christians Can Benefit from Social Media by “Capturing Miracles,” Says Ordained Minister

Christians Can Benefit from Social Media by “Capturing Miracles,” Says Ordained Minister | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
The site World Religion News posted a pretty generic article about how social media can help religious people spread their message to a younger generation. For the most part, it’s what you’d expect: Share sermons on YouTube!
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No, really, put on a happy face: The secret to winning someone’s trust

No, really, put on a happy face: The secret to winning someone’s trust | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
New research reveals how we assess a person's character traits based on their physical appearance
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How a bad night's sleep makes you more impulsive and can fuel addiction - Daily Mail

How a bad night's sleep makes you more impulsive and can fuel addiction - Daily Mail | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Societal problems like, excessive gambling and over spending could also be controlled by better managed sleep, according to researchers at Clemson University, South Carolina.

Via Tim Pope
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Is Empathy Overrated?

Is Empathy Overrated? | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Be kind, show understanding, do good—but, some scientists say, don’t try to feel others’ pain.


Bad idea, say cognitive psychologist Paul Bloom and neuroscientist Richard J. Davidson. At their Aspen Ideas Festival talk on Thursday, Bloom allowed that a the word “empathy” as it’s sometimes colloquially used—to mean kindness, goodness, morality, and love—is unobjectionable.


But in the Obama-esque sense of feeling another’s feelings, empathy, they contend, it mostly hurts the world. “To the extent that I’m an empathetic person,” Bloom said, “I’m a worse person.”


“The more empathy you have, the more violent you are—the more ready and willing you are to cause pain.”



by SPENCER KORNHABER



Via Edwin Rutsch
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Former Evangelical: The Truth About Christian 'Sexual Purity'

Former Evangelical: The Truth About Christian 'Sexual Purity' | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
What inspired you to write Virgin Nation?

I’ve been familiar with evangelical purity movements since I was an evangelical teenager. When I was young, “Why Wait?” by Josh McDowell was the only national program available—everyone was watching this VHS series in Sunday School or Youth Group.

One girl at my Christian school wore a shirt that said “I’m NOT Doing It” and listed all the bad things that could happen if you had sex. I myself wrote a letter to my local newspaper that had run a story about how teaching sexual abstinence was not realistic. I, the ever-zealous—and completely naïve—young evangelical, argued otherwise and offered myself as an example of teenagers who believed it wasn’t right to have sex.

So though there weren’t yet opportunities to take pledges and wear rings, I made a point to publicly declare my commitment to sexual abstinence before marriage.
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