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Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
Our brains have many glitches that interfere with honest self-awareness and accurate self-assessment
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4 Traits You Want in a Doctor | Health Essentials from Cleveland Clinic

4 Traits You Want in a Doctor | Health Essentials from Cleveland Clinic | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
1. Active listening
When you leave an appointment, do you feel like you’re leaving a lecture or a conversation?

A conversation is much more productive. You want a doctor who respects your opinion, listens with attention as you describe your health challenges and symptoms, and asks follow-up questions that dig deeper.

Ultimately, your doctor needs to understand how you make decisions about your care. Some patients are really active in the joint decision-making process. They dig into online research before an appointment and come ready with talking points. Others are more likely to talk through issues, then lean on the expertise of a doctor for treatment options.

If your doctor is an active listener, he or she will know what type of patient you are — and act accordingly

Via Edwin Rutsch
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Fighting the Empathy Deficit: How the Arts Can Make Us More Compassionate

Fighting the Empathy Deficit: How the Arts Can Make Us More Compassionate | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Stanford University’s Jane Shaw is a kind of empathy activist.

“How do you make the leap,” she said a few days ago, “to understand the experience of another person is really what empathy’s about.


Shaw, Stanford’s Dean for Religious Life, was showing me around a small-but-choice exhibit called Empathyat Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center.


The show is a companion piece to a class on empathy Shaw is teaching this fall, and a way for any museum goer to engage with a hot topic these days for religious scholars, neuroscientists, artists and politicians


Everyone from President Barack Obama to social psychologists are reporting a deficit in empathy and or a lack of compassion among college students, and a corresponding rise in narcissism.


.By Cy Musiker


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Imperfect Cognitions: Mind, Value and Mental Health Conference

Imperfect Cognitions: Mind, Value and Mental Health Conference | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
The Mind, Value and Mental Health International Conference in Philosophy and Psychiatry took place on 25 July 2015 at the picturesque St. Hilda’s College at the University of Oxford. It attracted philosophers, psychiatrists and psychologists both from the UK and from abroad. Below I summarise four of the papers presented on that immensely fascinating day.

The first talk was given by Rachel Cooper, Lancaster University (pictured below with Matthew Parrott) and was entitled ‘DSM-5: Stasis and Change’. Cooper argued that classifications like the DSM can be thought of as forming part of the infrastructure of science, and have much in common with material infrastructure. The implications are, Cooper suggested, are that as with material technologies it becomes possible for ‘path dependent’ development to cause a sub-optimal classification to get ‘locked in’ and hard to replace. Cooper argued that the DSM has become locked-in and as a consequence any changes to the diagnostic criteria have become very difficult.



The next paper was given by Gerrit Glas, (VU University, Netherlands) and was entitled ‘Psychopathology and Self-Relatedness: Conceptual Issues’. Glas defended the view that psychiatry needs a clinical conception of psychopathology, alongside scientific conceptions. Clinical conception, Glas argued, is both self-related and context-oriented. Glas introduced the notion of self-refentiality and explained how it can help to understand and make sense of the layers of clinical manifestations of mental illness.
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Feeling blue and seeing blue: Sadness may impair color perception

Feeling blue and seeing blue: Sadness may impair color perception | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
The world might sccm a little grayer than usual When We're down in the dumps and we Often talk about "feeling blue" - new research suggests que la associations we make entre emotion and color ...

Via Sandeep Gautam
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, September 3, 1:02 AM

a sad mood impairs detection of colors on the yellow-blue axis.

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One Person’s Empathy is Another’s Counter-Transference

One Person’s Empathy is Another’s Counter-Transference | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

One person’s empathy is another’s countertransference. I will not confess my weaknesses, since they will be obvious to the reader in any case.


The short – very short – definition of “countertransference” is one’s reaction and response to the other person. As Freud famously noted, betrayal oozes at every pore. That sometimes applies to psychotherapists too. Breakdowns in empathy occur. Defensiveness happens. Secrets are withheld or revealed.


And if there is empathy, can narcissistic rage be far behind? That too occurs, albeit in an aim-inhibited form. When a person gets angry enough, the person finds that being self-expressed is worth the risk of being vulnerable and exposed.


Lou Agosta


Via Edwin Rutsch
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fundsrefer's comment, September 3, 4:50 AM
good
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Selling Shame: 40 Outrageous Vintage Ads Any Woman Would Find Offensive

Selling Shame: 40 Outrageous Vintage Ads Any Woman Would Find Offensive | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

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k3hamilton's curator insight, September 1, 9:05 PM

sad

Karen Goldfarb Copywriter's curator insight, September 2, 11:17 AM

Lysol was sold as a douche? Yes, but here's the catch. It was really for birth control.


"These ads aren’t frightening women into thinking their genitals smell badly.  According to historian Andrea Tone, “feminine hygiene” was a euphemism.   


"Birth control was illegal in the U.S. until 1965 (for married couples) and 1972 (for single people).  These Lysol ads are actually for contraception.   


"The campaign made Lysol the best-selling method of contraception during the Great Depression." Quote from thesocietypages.org. 

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How Come Some People Believe in the Paranormal?

How Come Some People Believe in the Paranormal? | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Those who favor Bigfoot, UFOs and ghosts share a thinking style


Via Emre Erdogan
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Imperfect Cognitions: Optimism and the Creation of Everyday Myths

Imperfect Cognitions: Optimism and the Creation of Everyday Myths | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
After having studied relatively rare irrational beliefs, those that are also considered symptoms of psychiatric disorders and 'marks of madness', I have recently become interested in the irrationality of everyday beliefs and in particular in those beliefs and predictions that seem to betray excessive optimism.

On 15th January 2015, I was asked to give a talk to the public at Modern Art Oxford, a gallery hosting at the time an exhibition called "Love is Enough", with artwork by William Morris and Andy Warhol. The brief for the talk was to think about the creation of myths, something that interested both artists. I took the opportunity to examine the everyday myths that we all create when we think about our own character traits, talents, skills, and come to believe that we are better than average at everything.

When we imagine what our future will be like, we see it as free of failure, drama and illness, and exemplifying a continuous progress, moving from aspirations to achievements. Such illusory beliefs and unrealistic predictions seem to be good for us, as they have been shown to be beneficial by enhancing mental and physical health, and seem to make us also more resilient and sociable. It would seem that optimism fuels irrational beliefs that make us happier.
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How 'Netflix and chill' became internet slang for having sex

How 'Netflix and chill' became internet slang for having sex | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
It's every teen's favorite euphemism.

Via Kristen Machczynski
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23 maps and charts on language

Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish?

Via Kathleen Waller, Andrew Clarke, Kristen Machczynski
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International Baccalaureate teaches students to think critically, research shows - Sydney Morning Herald

International Baccalaureate teaches students to think critically, research shows - Sydney Morning Herald | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

The International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma is offered as an alternative to the HSC at about 15 private schools in NSW.


Via Shayne Swift, Kristen Machczynski
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The Case for Teaching Ignorance

The Case for Teaching Ignorance | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
When we present knowledge as more certain than it is, we discourage curiosity.

Via Kristen Machczynski
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Insufficient Sleep Can Increase Susceptibility To The Common Cold, Affect Physical Health

Insufficient Sleep Can Increase Susceptibility To The Common Cold, Affect Physical Health | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Getting anything less than six hours of sleep makes you more likely to catch a cold, new research shows.
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Inclusivity and Empathy for Better Games (IGDA Leadership Summit, Part I)

Inclusivity and Empathy for Better Games (IGDA Leadership Summit, Part I) | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Empowerment Through Empathetic Leadership

Another theme that ran through the conference was the need for empathy in the game development industry: for your team, for your company, and for your audience. Rami Ismail, co-founder of the Dutch game studio Vlambeer, delivered a keynote on how he learned to change his own approach to leadership through experience and learning the importance of context.


By Samantha Hautea 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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The Dark Side of Alternative Medicine and Holistic Healing

The Dark Side of Alternative Medicine and Holistic Healing | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Holistic healing sounds like a good thing. I certainly believe that each of us is far more than a cluster of discrete organs, bones and cells. I also believe that the thigh bone is connected to the hip bone; the mind and the body are a cohesive unit; that every illness experience is embedded in a wider social context; that environment matters; and that the manner in which a healer relates to a patient can result in widely different outcomes. And while we Americans may be suspicious that some brands of healing are nothing but quackery, unless the healer interferes with standard bio-medical treatment (for example, by telling patients they must stop receiving cancer chemotherapy) we tend to see holistic healing as benign” Even if it doesn’t “work” it helps people struggling with pain and disease feel better.
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Reputation and Its Risks

Reputation and Its Risks | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Identify, Quantify, marriages and the Risks to your company? S reputation long before a problem or crisis strikes.

Via Scott McElreath
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Community college professors often fail at teaching - Washington Post

Community college professors often fail at teaching - Washington Post | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

"The best book ever written about two-year colleges That shows pride doctoral Often cripples learning ..."

©


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The ‘shoe test’ at the first Empathy Museum

The ‘shoe test’ at the first Empathy Museum | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
“Before judging someone, try walking one mile in their shoes” – this is the motto that inspired the creation of the first Museum of Empathy, which will open in London on 4 September.


The opening is part of the Totally Thames Festival, featuring the installation ‘A Mile in My Shoes’. The event, created in collaboration with the residents of Wandsworth in south London, will take place on the banks of the Thames, where passersby will be asked to choose a pair of stranger’s shoes and walk along the river, listening to the owner’s story on headphones.


Other installations are planned for other cities in the world with a travelling tour. The events can be followed online with a digital library that raises the user’s awareness.


by Roberta Garofalo 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Restorative Circles Process for conflict mediation via empathic listening.

Restorative Circles Process for conflict mediation via empathic listening. | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

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7 Mind-Blowing Ways Virtual Technology Will Change Your World

7 Mind-Blowing Ways Virtual Technology Will Change Your World | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
The distinction between what is real and what is fake is blurring and will forever change how we work.Relationships drive business, and there is no substitute for face-to-face interactions. Video Conference Capability what supposed to change this, but has never become to equal alternative. In the coming years, though, the distinction between physical and virtual will blur When it comes to in-person interactions.Advances in holographic and virtual technology will change what we know and how we view

Via Amy Cross
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Rain is sizzling bacon, cars are lions roaring: the art of sound in movies | Jordan Kisner

Rain is sizzling bacon, cars are lions roaring: the art of sound in movies | Jordan Kisner | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
The long read: Skip Lievsay is one of the most talented men in Hollywood. He has created audioscapes for Martin Scorsese and is the only sound man the Coen brothers go to. But the key to this work is more than clever effects, it is understanding the human mind

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The 6 fundamental debates of ToK.

The 6 fundamental debates of ToK. | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Every knower will live with a set of internal debates about their own personal knowledge, for example we may ask ourselves whether we have correctly interpreted another person’s behaviour,  or whet...

Via Kathleen Waller, Andrew Clarke, Kristen Machczynski
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