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Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
Our brains have many glitches that interfere with honest self-awareness and accurate self-assessment
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Only If You Are Serious About Science Communication & Education

Only If You Are Serious About Science Communication & Education | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
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Science Stumbles onto a Creativity Pill

Science Stumbles onto a Creativity Pill | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
What's the Latest? When Parkinson's patients treated with a synthetic dopamine-precursor pill, levodopa, showed high upticks in creative activities from writing novels to painting portraits, their doctors began to wonder at the...
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Our Tolerance For Our Loved Ones' Negative Qualities Diminishes Over Time

Our Tolerance For Our Loved Ones' Negative Qualities Diminishes Over Time | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
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Do you find that you treat total strangers better than your loved ones? Or that your worst behavior is reserved for longtime friends and family? You're probably not alone, says Dr.
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Magnetic Resonance Imaging study finds brain abnormalities in regular marijuana users

Magnetic Resonance Imaging study finds brain abnormalities in regular marijuana users | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
People who regularly use marijuana show significant abnormalities in areas of the brain associated with motivation and emotion, a team of Swiss researchers has found.
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This Dinner Party Explains How Engineers And Lobbyists See The World Differently

This Dinner Party Explains How Engineers And Lobbyists See The World Differently | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
The first generation of tech companies didn’t concern itself too much with Washington. And some of them paid a price. In turn, the second and even the third g
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What Did Doctors Learn By Scaring Toddlers in the "Risk Room"?

What Did Doctors Learn By Scaring Toddlers in the "Risk Room"? | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Remember the twisted experiment to see what happens when kids think they've broken a treasured toy ?
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Rise of the Christian left: Why the religious right’s moment may be ending

Rise of the Christian left: Why the religious right’s moment may be ending | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
From Pope Francis to a generation with new priorities, the finest Christian traditions are being reinvigorated
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Social norms, morals and self-interest as determinants of pro-environment behaviour

Abstract: This paper considers the role which selfish, moral and social incentives and pressures play in explaining the extent to which stated choices over pro-environment behaviours vary across individuals. The empirical context is choices over household waste contracts and recycling actions in Poland. A theoretical model is used to show how cost-based motives and the desire for a positive self- and social image combine to determine the utility from alternative choices of recycling behaviour. We then describe a discrete choice experiment designed to empirically investigate the effects such drivers have on stated choices. Using a latent class model, we distinguish three types of individual who are described as duty-orientated recyclers, budget recyclers and homo oeconomicus. These groups vary in their preferences for how frequently waste is collected, and the number of categories into which household waste must be recycled. Our results have implications for the design of future policies aimed at improving participation in recycling schemes.


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Solving Global Challenges with Cross Disciplinary Initiatives

Solving Global Challenges with Cross Disciplinary Initiatives | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
By: Julie Keane, PhD. Global challenges can only be addressed by cross disciplinary initiatives that bring together science art and the humanities. We must cross these boundaries.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 21, 6:58 PM

By: Julie Keane, PhD. Global challenges can only be addressed by cross disciplinary initiatives that bring together science art and the humanities. We must cross these boundaries.


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Is quantum mechanics relevant to the philosophy of mind (and the other way around)?

Is quantum mechanics relevant to the philosophy of mind (and the other way around)? | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
by Quentin Ruyant There have been speculations on a possible link between quantum mechanics and the mind almost since the early elaboration of quantum theory (including by well known physicists, su...
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So It Begins: Darpa Sets Out to Make Computers That Can Teach Themselves

So It Begins: Darpa Sets Out to Make Computers That Can Teach Themselves | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

The Pentagon’s blue-sky research agency is readying a nearly four-year project to boost artificial intelligence systems by building machines that can teach themselves — while making it easier for ordinary schlubs like us to build them, too.

When Darpa talks about artificial intelligence, it’s not talking about modeling computers after the human brain. That path fell out of favor among computer scientists years ago as a means of creating artificial intelligence; we’d have to understand our own brains first before building a working artificial version of one. But the agency thinks we can build machines that learn and evolve, using algorithms — “probabilistic programming” — to parse through vast amounts of data and select the best of it. After that, the machine learns to repeat the process and do it better.

But building such machines remains really, really hard: The agency calls it “Herculean.” There are scarce development tools, which means “even a team of specially-trained machine learning experts makes only painfully slow progress.” So on April 10, Darpa is inviting scientists to a Virginia conference to brainstorm. What will follow are 46 months of development, along with annual “Summer Schools,” bringing in the scientists together with “potential customers” from the private sector and the government.


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You shouldn’t try to pigeonhole quantum physics

You shouldn’t try to pigeonhole quantum physics | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Just when you thought quantum physics couldn’t get any weirder, it violates the pigeonhole principle.

No, it’s not about a pigeon in a hole that is simultaneously alive and dead. The pigeonhole principle is a basic tenet of mathematics. It illustrates what the very idea of numbers is all about. And it’s easy to state: If you put three pigeons in two pigeonholes, at least two of the pigeons end up in the same hole.

How can anybody, even a quantum physicist, argue with that? All you have to do is be able to count. Guess again, say quantum physicist Yakir Aharonov and collaborators in a new paper about the pigeonhole principle. “It seems … to be an abstract and immutable truth, beyond any doubt,” they write. “Yet … for quantum particles the principle does not hold.”

The basic idea was worked out in rigorous form in 1834 by Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet, a gifted 19th century German mathematician of Belgian descent. He called it Schubfachprinzip, which means something like the drawer principle. Nowadays mathematicians whodon’t like pigeons call it the Dirichlet box principle. In that form the principle is stated as whenever more than n objects are distributed in n boxes, then there will be at least one box containing two objects.


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The Mermaid's Tale: More on IRBs and restraint on science

The Mermaid's Tale: More on IRBs and restraint on science | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
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Skimming Is the New Reading. Thanks Internet!

Skimming Is the New Reading. Thanks Internet! | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
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As more of our professional and pleasurable reading shifts to screens, the way in which we read is changing.
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Why the Things We Seek to Make Us Happy Will Turn Us Sad

Why the Things We Seek to Make Us Happy Will Turn Us Sad | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
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From self-help books to the latest pop song, happiness is today's good and righteous goal. But what is happiness?
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Why People Work More than They Need To, Choosing Stress Over Leisure

Why People Work More than They Need To, Choosing Stress Over Leisure | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
What's the Latest? Researchers at the University of Chicago have found--perhaps it's no surprise given the struggling economy--that many people are willing to work more hours than are needed to do their jobs, even though it results in a more...
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Prisoner’s Dilemma study shows youth don’t follow a predictable cooperative strategy

Prisoner’s Dilemma study shows youth don’t follow a predictable cooperative strategy | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Young people between the ages of ten and sixteen demonstrate more fickle behaviour when it comes to cooperating, unlike other age groups. People over the age of 66 demonstrated the most cooperative behaviour.
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This Lovely Music Video Is Also a Lesson in How Cells Grow

This Lovely Music Video Is Also a Lesson in How Cells Grow | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
British digital artist Andy Lomas has created a virtual model of cellular growth, allowing us to watch as intricate bio-inspired sculptures slowly take shape.
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Creationist Ken Ham: We Should Stop Exploring Space Because the Bible Says Aliens Would Go to Hell

Creationist Ken Ham: We Should Stop Exploring Space Because the Bible Says Aliens Would Go to Hell | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
One of the criticisms of Creationism (besides the whole “it’s wrong” thing) is that it stifles curiosity. “God did it” not only doesn’t answer anything, it stops you from seeking out actual answers.
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‘Why I love to quit’

‘Why I love to quit’ | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Paul Jarvis experiments with words and design. His latest book is called The Good Creative: 18 ways to make better art.

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, July 21, 7:43 PM
Do you need some inspiration?
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 21, 7:57 PM

It depend what you are trying to quit. A bad habit can be hard to quit. Something you love, but know is not good for you is hard to quit. It took me several years to leave the classroom. I loved what I did as much as being in School with many adults who did not support what we did.

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Stirling Behavioural Science Blog : Loss aversion in penalty shootouts

Stirling Behavioural Science Blog : Loss aversion in penalty shootouts | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Kahneman discusses this phenomenon in his book Thinking Fast and Slow in the context of golf, where loss aversion actually improves performance:

"Failing to make par is a loss, but missing a birdies putt is a foregone gain, not a loss. [Devin] Pope and [Maurice] Schweitzer reasoned from loss aversion that players would try a little harder when putting for par (to avoid a bogey) than when putting for a birdie. They analyzed more than 2.5 million putts in exquisite detail to test that prediction. They were right. Whether the putt was easy or hard, at every distance from the hole, the players were more successful when putting for par [i.e. avoiding a loss] than for a birdie [i.e. achieving a gain]. The difference in their rate of success when going for par (to avoid a bogey) or for a birdie was 3.6%. 

This difference is not trivial. Tiger Woods was one of the "participants" in their study. If in his best years Tiger Woods had managed to putt as well for birdies as he did for par, his average tournament score would have improved by one stroke and his earnings by almost $1 million per season."


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Ha-Joon Chang: Why Everybody Should Know Some Economics

Ha-Joon Chang: Why Everybody Should Know Some Economics | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Ha-Joon Chang explains why everybody has a duty to learn some basic economics in order to make informed decisions.

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needs inventory |

The following list of needs is neither exhaustive nor definitive. It is meant as a starting place to support anyone who wishes to engage in a process of deepening self-discovery and to facilitate greater understanding and connection between people. We have another list that might also be of interest to you: a list of feelings.
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12 Dozen Places To Educate Yourself Online For Free

12 Dozen Places To Educate Yourself Online For Free | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
All education is self-education.  Period.  It doesn’t matter if you’re sitting in a college classroom or a coffee shop.  We… (All education is self-education.  Period...


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=autodidact


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?q=learning+2+learn



 


Via Dan Forbes, Ricard Lloria, Sonia C. Alonso, juandoming, Aki Puustinen, Gust MEES
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maria papanikou's curator insight, July 21, 1:04 PM

A complete list of sites sources of knowledge for free no matter what our field of interest may be! Get the time to explore it and choose what serves you the best! 

Richard Samson's curator insight, Today, 2:38 AM

There is something for everyone here. You can learn about anything online!

Liz Falconer's curator insight, Today, 10:41 AM

Great quote

 

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The Mermaid's Tale: On the mythology of natural selection. Part I: Introduction

The Mermaid's Tale: On the mythology of natural selection. Part I: Introduction | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
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