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Rescooped by Connor McDade from Boys and Reading
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Education World: Male Teachers Show That Real Men Read

Education World: Male Teachers Show That Real Men Read | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Posters showing men reading and talking about the benefits of reading can encourage more boys to pick up books.

Via Heather Stapleton
Connor McDade's insight:

This article features an initiative called "Real Men Read." Simply by creating posters showing real men of different backgrounds and appearances reading, the campaign attacks misconceptions regarding literacy and masculinity. The system started by first capturing male faculty and teachers reading, yet it has expanded to include a wide range of men worthy of being role models. By debunking the myth that literacy is not masculine, the campaign celebrates male readership, one teacher at a time, with specifically disciplinary examples of literacy. One middle school even bought hundreds of graphic novels to try and hook more boys on reading. Boys, who often struggle with attention span, can grow to hate reading, yet literacy is a key component to education, particularly those that seek further education after grade school.

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Rescooped by Connor McDade from Gender & Education - Boys Underachieving
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How can we raise boys' achievement?

How can we raise boys' achievement? | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Boys' underachievement is an issue that's not going away, says Gary Wilson.

Via Amy Bradshaw
Connor McDade's insight:

This article explores different reasons for male underacheivement in the classroom. It cites issues of attention span, role models, and curriculum ill-suited to male learned as potential points of focus. I like how the article calls for more male teachers as role models in order to help instill "a more caring masculinity" that will assist with character development. By slowing down expectations and rigor, the article claims that boys will be more ready for expressive and interpretive activities. Finally, the power of peer pressure between male students is confronted as a strong deterrent of academic performance within most school environments.

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Rescooped by Connor McDade from Gender & Education - Boys Underachieving
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What About The Boys? Boys Face Serious Issues Which Are Being Ignored, Experts Argue

What About The Boys? Boys Face Serious Issues Which Are Being Ignored, Experts Argue | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Issues affecting boys are more serious than those affecting girls, but they have been neglected by policy makers, according to expert opinion.

Via Amy Bradshaw
Connor McDade's insight:

This article takes a far more empirical approach than some of the other sources, directly referencing studies and specific findings in a more methodological manner. First, the entire 'boyhood crisis' is laid out, citing not only an acheivement gap in academic areas, but also including other areas in which boys suffer, such as mental health and social development. The article criticizes current policy decisions, saying that they are leaving boys behind. Female underperformance within STEM fields is discussed, yet undermined by they more pressing needs boys face. By shifting the conversation away from boosting female achievement in STEM, more attention can be focused to confronting the specificall 'gendered' problems both boys and girls face.

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Rescooped by Connor McDade from fitness, health,news&music
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Study: Education Extends Longevity, Except for Black Males

Study: Education Extends Longevity, Except for Black Males | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
New research on the connection between education and longevity shows substantial disparities by race and gender.

Via Ellen Diane
Connor McDade's insight:

This article opens by demonstrating societal advances over the past decades, in order to demonstrate which demographics have been most limited from advancement. In the past century, life expectancies have skyrocketed due to advanced science, medicine, and nutritional knowledge. However, this life expectancy boost has been driven almost entirely by the most educated members of society. "About 40 percent of the least-educated African American males who make it to age 25 will die before they are 65, the study found, as will 22 percent of the most-educated. For all other groups, the chances of dying by age 65 are only 10 percent." The study brings attention to glaring gaps, not just in academic achievement, but also in sheer longevity and health; a relationship that cannot be ignored.

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Jessica Koporetz's curator insight, May 13, 4:46 PM

Researchers point to education for a longer and healthier life. Young black men that are in school are safer than they are in the streets.  They are not exposed to gang life, drugs, alcohol, etc. Instead they are focused on gaining knowledge and establishing a career.  But, the confusing statistic is the following “About 40 percent of the least-educated African American males who make it to age 25 will die before they are 65, the study found, as will 22 percent of the most-educated.  For all other groups, the chances of dying by age 65 are only 10 percent.”(Peters-Smith) Why is this number so high if they are removed from the toxic environment?  Is it because the black man is always having to prove that they are intelligent, hardworking, worthy of having a job or money for that matter?

Idalia Veguilla's curator insight, May 14, 7:56 PM

Life span and education are related.  The more education someone has the more likely they are to live longer.  This makes sense considering uneducated people make unhealthy food choices.

Rescooped by Connor McDade from The Indigenous Uprising of the British Isles
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1 in 5 boys at primaries have no male teachers while some could go through their entire education without one

1 in 5 boys at primaries have no male teachers while some could go through their entire education without one | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Official statistics compiled for the first time reveal how 360,485 boys aged four to 11 are attending schools which have only women teachers.

Via Infidel Patriot
Connor McDade's insight:

This study compiles and analyzes crucial data that sheds light on a possible contributing factor to the achievement gap between genders. The article assessed a sentiment very familiar to anyone who can recall their primary school experience; there are very few male teachers. This manifests itself in many ways, by affecting the school atmosphere, classroom management and prevalence of positive role models. In a time where many of the most high-profile male role models are athletes and musical artists with less-than-ideal moral standing, students need positive role models to look to. If they have to wait until the are adolescents to get instruction from someone of their own gender, it is no wonder their motivation and enthusiasm falters.

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Rescooped by Connor McDade from :: The 4th Era ::
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Black and Latino Males: Getting to and Through College ~ Education Writers Assn.

"Shaun Harper, director of the Center for Study of Race and Equity in Education at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, previews new research on how New York City addressed the challenge of guiding more of its black and Latino male students to postsecondary success."


Via Jim Lerman
Connor McDade's insight:

This is an extremely interesting and engaging video of Shaun Harper, in which he addresses college preparation in urban schools. Particularly focusing on black and Latino male students, Harper explores the dynamics that encourage and discourage these students from achievement in their current academic careers as well as further educational options. He shares data and anecdotes from interviewed students that maintained high grades, were involved in extracurricular activities, and had plans to enroll at a four-year institution upon graduation. Harper also shares insight on the inconsistencies and disadvantages that even the brightest students from urban areas face. At the end of his talk, Harper shares with the audience that the 'brightest 17-year-old I know' was applying to a school far below his potential. By reaching out and educating, we can make sure all of our students are exposed to options that fit the trajectory of their lives and careers.

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Rescooped by Connor McDade from AC Affairs
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Gender gap in university applications widens further after fees rise

Gender gap in university applications widens further after fees rise | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it

Proportion of students from disadvantaged backgrounds going to elite universities rises 10% as overall applications fall.

Women are a third more likely to go to university than men, according to a Ucas report, widening the gender gulf in higher education.

Demand for university places fell in terms of applications (-8.8%) and acceptances (-13%) when higher fees were introduced for students this October. But the fall in the number of young men applying was about twice that of young women, with entry rates for both at 24.6% and 32.5% respectively...


Via @AngloCatalans
Connor McDade's insight:

This article explores recent economic influences on university application and attendance, demonstrative of societal attitudes and dynamics. An increase in application fees is yet another blow to male application, further perpetuating the gender gap at the university level. In fact, the application rate of male students was lower than the entry rate for female students, meaning that "if the acceptance rate for men was 100%, the resulting entry rate for men would still be below that of women." The most recent data does show an increase in university attendance from disadvantaged demographics, yet the gap between the genders continues to rise. Experts do have faith that the gap will work itself out eventually, but proactive measures should be taken to help confront the gap with purpose and enthusiasm.

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Mac Cagle's comment, May 7, 2013 3:50 PM
Its intresting to see that this trend seems to be international. i had always just figured that it was an american things but the study from the UK claims other wise.
Alicia Milanowski's comment, May 7, 2013 9:01 PM
How interesting! I would have never realized this was such a big issue before reading your scoopit page! Its strange to because I am a woman so one would assume that I would be in the know on these issues but I am most certainly not. Thank you for bringing this issue to peoples attention.
Alycia Degenstein's curator insight, January 16, 1:51 PM

This shows that there is not just a gap in terms of socio-economic status, but also in gender. However, I was surprised that more women are accpepting offers to university than men.

Rescooped by Connor McDade from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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90% of Wikipedia's Editors Are Male—Here's What They're Doing About It

90% of Wikipedia's Editors Are Male—Here's What They're Doing About It | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Kristina Alexanderson/FlickrWikipedia is unlike little else in history. Relied on by students, scholars, journalists, and citizens, it’s one of the top 10 websites in the world and the not-so-hidden base of much of our informational infrastructure.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Common Core Needs Tailoring for Gifted Learners, Advocates Say

Common Core Needs Tailoring for Gifted Learners, Advocates Say | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Pedagogically, the common-core standards are already akin to gifted education but teachers will still need guidance on how to differentiate them for the most able learners.
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Problem of gender differences on physics assessments remains unsolved - Science Codex

Problem of gender differences on physics assessments remains unsolved - Science Codex | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Problem of gender differences on physics assessments remains unsolved
Science Codex
"These tests have been very important in the history of physics education reform," said Dr. McKagan, who co-authored the new analysis.
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Rescooped by Connor McDade from Gender & Education - Boys Underachieving
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Sometimes it's hard to be a boy - Article - TES

Sometimes it's hard to be a boy - Article - TES | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Debate over boys' under-achievement fails to recognise social pressures and the rigidity of the curriculum, says David Spendlove...

Via Amy Bradshaw
Connor McDade's insight:

This article focuses on two incluences that discourage the performance of male learners, which ultimately influences their chances of continuing their education. By addressing the 'social pressures' that often provide obstacles for learning, and reworking the interior of education, the curriculum itself, schools can begin to boost male achievement. Issues in physical development cause pressure within schools, and boys are forced to further reconsider their increasingly vague roles in a rapidly evolving society. Patience is heralded as an essential component of assisting with male development, as leaps in cognitive and social abilities occur at different times, causing conflict between genders and between students and authority. The article cites increased risks in suicide, eating disorders, exclusion from school, behavioral problems, and a gendered achievement gap as risks that involve stakeholders supporting our male youth.

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Rescooped by Connor McDade from Boys and Reading
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Education World: Male Teachers Show That Real Men Read

Education World: Male Teachers Show That Real Men Read | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Posters showing men reading and talking about the benefits of reading can encourage more boys to pick up books.

Via Heather Stapleton
Connor McDade's insight:

This article features an initiative called "Real Men Read." Simply by creating posters showing real men of different backgrounds and appearances reading, the campaign attacks misconceptions regarding literacy and masculinity. The system started by first capturing male faculty and teachers reading, yet it has expanded to include a wide range of men worthy of being role models. By debunking the myth that literacy is not masculine, the campaign celebrates male readership, one teacher at a time, with specifically disciplinary examples of literacy. One middle school even bought hundreds of graphic novels to try and hook more boys on reading. Boys, who often struggle with attention span, can grow to hate reading, yet literacy is a key component to education, particularly those that seek further education after grade school.

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Rescooped by Connor McDade from real utopias
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The gender gap at universities: where are all the men? - The Guardian (blog)

The gender gap at universities: where are all the men? - The Guardian (blog) | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it

If you're a male student on campus at Liverpool Hope, Bath Spa or Cumbria University, you may be feeling a little outnumbered. These are some of the 20 institutions where there are twice as many female fulltime undergraduates as there are male, according to Higher Education Statistics Authority (Hesa) data.


Via jean lievens
Connor McDade's insight:

This article presents sweepingly strong data regarding the gender gap in university attendance in the UK. Researchers attribute recent boosts in female university attendance to more focused STEM instruction, opening up more fields for amibitious female students. This 'international phenomenon' is apparent within the US as well, as both education systems have many outdated components and dynamics that are better suited to learning styles often found in female students. This leaves male students to struggle in a system poorly suited for finding and celebrating their achievement within grade school. The gap must be addressed in a preventive manner, rather than a reactionary one. Obviously, success at the grade school level will either encourage or discourage further education, so having a strong foundation of support is the best way to promote higher education for male students.

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Rescooped by Connor McDade from Science News
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Is This the End of Men or The Beginning of Women? : Discovery News

Is This the End of Men or The Beginning of Women? : Discovery News | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Statistics point to the waning of male dominance in the workplace and in education.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
Connor McDade's insight:

This article evaluates the relatively recent shift in the workplace that includes a heavier portion of female employees. I find it interesting how threatened and defensive the male gender seems to be as women gain stronger numbers in positions as well as power from those positions. Women dominate 13/15 of the job fields that are projected to boom most drastically in the next ten years, which may leave females with an extremely strong grasp on multiple industries. This is apparently a threatening and concerning idea to many males, who feel that equality must indicate the 'end of men;' an extremely ironic idea. Does relinquishing male dominance in all workplaces to qualified and amibitious females demonstrate the 'end of men?' It shouldn't; this is just called equality, don't get so defensive, gentlemen.

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Trenton middle schools add extracurricular activities to engage students - The Times of Trenton - NJ.com

Trenton middle schools add extracurricular activities to engage students - The Times of Trenton - NJ.com | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Trenton middle schools add extracurricular activities to engage students The Times of Trenton - NJ.com Superintendent Francisco Duran has previously said by engaging the middle school students, who are usually between the ages of 11 and 14, the...
Connor McDade's insight:

This article shares data and anecdotes about the advantages of extracurricular activities. Even at the early age of middle school, expanding the scholastic experience to include extracurricular activities helps boost overall engagement, structure, and character building. This is particularly relevant to male students, who may suffer because of their surplus energy. Providing outlets for all students is essential, and extracurriculars can often assist a student by supplying more peers to collaborate with, and exposing students to new and perhaps more compatible adults as role models. This can be essential for male students that can benefit from male role models, but who may not have any male teachers or positive male influences at home.

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Rescooped by Connor McDade from SMART HIGHER ED BLOG
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Stunning college degree gap: Women have earned almost 10 million more college degrees than men since 1982

Stunning college degree gap: Women have earned almost 10 million more college degrees than men since 1982 | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it

According to data from the Department of Education on college degrees by gender, the US college degree gap favoring women started back in 1978. The concern about gender imbalances and gender equity in higher education is very selective, imbalanced and inequitable – there is only concern when women are under-represented and never any concern when men are under-represented.


Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
Connor McDade's insight:

This article sheds light on an acheivement gap that rarely gains attention in educational spheres. Despite the patriarchal nature of education, women have, since 1982, dominated the proportion of college graduates. Perry contrasts neglect of male underachievement with attention paid to female underachievement within STEM fields. "The reality is that the concern about gender imbalances and gender equity in higher education is very selective, imbalanced and inequitable – there is only concern when women are under-represented and never any concern when men are under-represented." While Perry brings attention to gender gaps in achievement, he endorses a more objective view of the entire equation, where everyone is valued equally and considered just as at-risk.

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Richard Posner tackles complexity - Huffington Post

Richard Posner tackles complexity - Huffington Post | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Richard Posner tackles complexity Huffington Post Only students, and fewer of them, take the time (have the time) to plow through "Paradise Lost" or "The Wasteland," not to say the superstructure of interpretation rising from long, difficult, very...
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Saturday reading program is devoted to advanced learners

Saturday reading program is devoted to advanced learners | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it
Metro Nashville Public Schools and Vanderbilt University in Tennessee recently collaborated to enroll fifth- and sixth-grade students in a reading academy for learners who are advanced.
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Rescooped by Connor McDade from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
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Teacher Feature - Teachers responding to what makes them passionate about education

Teacher Feature - Teachers responding to what makes them passionate about education | College Access for Male Learners | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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