How to lose a (cheap) campaign
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How to lose a (cheap) campaign
A local candidate advocates campaign finance reform, practices what he peaches - and almost wins against long odds!
Curated by Robert Trotner
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A Way Out of the Gun Stalemate

A Way Out of the Gun Stalemate | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it
Unless gun-control advocates and gun-rights supporters look for common ground, the next massacre is only a matter of time.
Robert Trotner's insight:

This op-ed was written immediately followingjust five months ago, immediately following Aurora. Listen to the wisdom.

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Many Lawmakers Personally Invested in JPMorgan Chase

Many Lawmakers Personally Invested in JPMorgan Chase | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it

By Russ Choma, Open Secrets

 

When Wall Street giant JPMorgan Chase announced this week that it had lost an estimated $2 billion (now upped to $3 billion) on risky trades, Republican and Democratic members of Congress rushed to make their political cases: Either this was something that more regulation couldn't have prevented, or this was exactly what stronger government rules could have thwarted.

None of them, however, mentioned whether they had a financial stake in JPMorgan Chase.

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Democratic Rep: Amend Constitution To Allow Control Of Speech - CBS Atlanta

Democratic Rep: Amend Constitution To Allow Control Of Speech - CBS Atlanta | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it

This article seems to have represented a Tea Party slant on the ongoing Citizens United amendment fight. Especially for their conservative readership, the local Atlanta CBS affiliate has cast the amend fight as an attempt to limit free speech; you would think that we were talking about revoking the 1st Amendment - not stemming the flow of corrupting money into politics partially brought on by this very recent miscarriage of justice. And of course the article comments are as expected; God help us if they represent the level of understanding of most Americans.[MORE]


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Frank Kirkwood's comment, December 3, 2012 9:25 AM
The reporter is incorrect in declaring that the Citizens United decision, "found that a state law prohibiting corporations from making political campaign contributions using their treasury funds was unconstitutional." The link to the Supreme Court blog included in the report makes that pretty clear. The decision was about independent political expenditures, not campaign contributions. God help us if this represents the level of understanding of any reporter, much less a major network affiliate.
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Revenge of the Reality-Based Community

Revenge of the Reality-Based Community | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it

by BRUCE BARTLETT, The American Conservative

 

I know that it’s unattractive and bad form to say “I told you so” when one’s advice was ignored yet ultimately proved correct. But in the wake of the Republican election debacle, it’s essential that conservatives undertake a clear-eyed assessment of who on their side was right and who was wrong. Those who were wrong should be purged and ignored; those who were right, especially those who inflicted maximum discomfort on movement conservatives in being right, ought to get credit for it and become regular reading for them once again.

 

I’m not going to beat around the bush and pretend I don’t have a vested interest here. Frankly, I think I’m at ground zero in the saga of Republicans closing their eyes to any facts or evidence that conflict with their dogma. Rather than listen to me, they threw me under a bus. To this day, I don’t think they understand that my motives were to help them avoid the permanent decline that now seems inevitable.

 

For more than 30 years, I was very comfortable within the conservative wing of the Republican Party. I still recall supporting Richard Nixon and Barry Goldwater as a schoolchild. As a student, I was a member of Young Republicans and Young Americans for Freedom at the height of the Vietnam War, when conservatives on college campuses mostly kept their heads down. [MORE] | 


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Making the 'Do-Nothing Congress' look great by comparison

Making the 'Do-Nothing Congress' look great by comparison | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it

By Steve Benen, The Maddowblog - Thu Nov 29, 2012 


In his second term, President Harry Truman condemned the snail's pace at which lawmakers actually got some work done, labeling it a "Do-Nothing" Congress. After all, the 80th Congress (1947-1948) only passed 906 bills over its two-year period.

 

The current Congress, by comparison, has passed just 196 bills, easily the lowest total since the U.S. House Clerk's office started keeping track. Consider the progress in chart form, which should drive home just how unproductive the 112th Congress (2011-2012) really is.

In fairness, I should note that the current Congress still has another month to go, and I suppose it's possible that there will be a flurry of progress and constructive policymaking. But given partisan differences and a shrinking calendar, I'm pretty comfortable with the notion that this will be the least productive of any modern Congress by a large margin.

 

This is not, by the way, the inevitable result of divided government (one party controlling the House; the other party controlling the Senate). There have been plenty of other Congresses, some quite recently, with a Democratic Senate and a Republican House, but their bill totals weren't nearly this anemic.

 

This is not, by the way, the inevitable result of divided government (one party controlling the House; the other party controlling the Senate). There have been plenty of other Congresses, some quite recently, with a Democratic Senate and a Republican House, but their bill totals weren't nearly this anemic.

 

When evaluating whether this is, in fact, the worst Congress ever, keep this tidbit in mind.

 

MORE:http://maddowblog.msnbc.com/_news/2012/11/29/15541727-making-the-do-nothing-congress-look-great-by-comparison#.ULedP5KJzfY.scoopit

 


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Gov. Cuomo and Campaign Finance Reform

Gov. Cuomo and Campaign Finance Reform | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it
Gov. Andrew Cuomo should use his political stature to keep promises on campaign finance reform.
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Study: American Households Hit 43-Year Low In Net Worth - CBS DC

Study: American Households Hit 43-Year Low In Net Worth - CBS DC | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it
The median net worth of American households has dropped to a 43-year low as the lower and middle classes appear poorer and less stable than they have been since 1969.
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Why do we continue to let Ignorance = Strength?

Why do we continue to let Ignorance = Strength? | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it

Thinking about what Annabel Part wrote last night (on the Coffee Party FB page) reminds me of the power we give language and the ways in which language is used by those in power: to distract us (at best), or adjust our thinking (at worst).

Orwell captured the idea best with his notion of doublespeak and today it seems frighteningly prescient... particularly the idea that so many find strength through ignorance. We all owe it to ourselves to educate and be educated, to know history (and not only our own), and to engage in thoughtful discussion. Only through truth and knowledge does the future brighten. -- M. Charney


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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, November 30, 2012 6:12 AM

This article is about something I noticed myself. I was stunned when Mitt Romney flipped the negative meaning of trickle down economics to “trickle down government” with the idea that was a bad thing. The idea that things don't trickle down as promised, sold, and pushed to us if only we make the wealthy richer has been a negative thing for the larger society and a lie so far. The government HAS been the one doing the trickling down..., which means it IS working the way it should. Greatest example of flipping words and double talk I've seen in years. No wonder Obama was struck silent at such bizarre logic.

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The Problem With Money in Politics - Lawrence Lessig, Harvard Law

On November 17th, Cenk Uygur joined some of the leading minds in the country at the UCLA School of Law to discuss Constitutional and legislative solutions to get big money and corporations to release their chokehold on American democracy and policy.


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Robert Trotner's comment, November 26, 2012 10:39 AM
I missed this because of my Jewish Sabbath, and then when I tried to listen to a replay Saturday night, it wasn't available. Thanks so much!!! Shared.
Michael Charney's comment, November 26, 2012 12:32 PM
You're very welcome, Bob.
Robert Trotner's comment, November 26, 2012 12:51 PM
I hope this goes viral! This is a Republic Issue, a Cancer Issue, and an Inside vs. Outside Issue. I for one, would love to see the purchase of potato chips far outstrip the purchase of political favors lol. And i agree a statute is the way to go for the reason you mentioned and many others. :)
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America's voting system is a disgrace

America's voting system is a disgrace | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it
David Frum says the voting system gives too much power to local authorities and political parties, leading to a chaotic process.

By DAVID FRUM, CNN


 When the polls close in most other democracies, the results are known almost instantly. Ballots are usually counted accurately and rapidly, and nobody disputes the result. Complaints of voter fraud are rare; complaints of voter suppression are rarer still.


The kind of battle we are seeing in Florida -- where Democrats and Republicans will go to court over whether early voting should span 14 days or eight -- simply does not happen in Germany, Canada, Britain or France. The ballot uncertainty that convulsed the nation after Florida's vote in 2000 could not happen in Mexico or Brazil.


Almost everywhere else, elections are run by impartial voting agencies. In France, elections are the responsibility of the Ministry of the Interior, which establishes places and hours of voting, prints ballots (France still uses paper) and counts the votes. In Germany, an independent federal returning officer oversees a complex state and federal voting system.

 

[MORE]http://www.cnn.com/2012/11/05/opinion/frum-election-chaos/index.html


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The Insourcing Boom | The Atlantic

The Insourcing Boom | The Atlantic | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it
After years of offshore production, General Electric is moving much of its far-flung appliance-manufacturing operations back home. It is not alone.

Via Lynda Park
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Joseph Pomponio's comment, December 12, 2012 2:26 AM
Good but where? Right to work states where workers take a cut in the standard of living? Just building a one world economy by lowering ours to equal theirs?
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Tax Incentives to Companies Bleeding Towns Dry, With Few Results

Tax Incentives to Companies Bleeding Towns Dry, With Few Results | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it
States, counties and cities are giving up more than $80 billion each year to companies, with few results.
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The Norquist Anti-Tax Pledge is Cracking — And That’s a Good Thing

The Norquist Anti-Tax Pledge is Cracking — And That’s a Good Thing | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it

by SCOTT GALUPO, The American Conservative

 

Grover Norquist’s anti-tax dogma is slowly losing its grip on Republicans in both chambers of Congress. The Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza has a handy rundown on the growing crop GOP defectors, but for brevity’s sake, they are Sens. Lindsey Graham, Bob Corker, and Saxby Chambliss, as well as Rep. Peter King. This is on top of Speaker John Boehner’s pithy characterization of Norquist as “some random person” (if only!).

 

Count me as unapologetically happy about this development.

It’s not that I’m thrilled by the promise of higher taxes.

 

Rather, I think the party, and the conservative movement at large, is long overdue in recognizing that the Norquist pledge has proved a spectacular failure on its own terms. The pledge was more than simply a safeguard against tax increases; it was a means to an end. Norquist memorably described that end thusly: “I don’t want to abolish government. I simply want to reduce it to the size where I can drag it into the bathroom and drown it in the bathtub.”

 

And how’d that work out?

 

The pledge arrived on the scene in 1986. And we do see, in Barro’s chart, a dip in federal spending as a share of GDP, beginning around the time of the Clinton administration. Barro explains that, during that period, we “caught lightning in a bottle … and can’t plan on doing so again”:

 

Of this 4.7 percentage points of GDP decline in government spending, nearly all (3.9 points) is attributable to the federal budget. About half of that (1.8 points) is the “peace dividend”: reductions in federal defense spending after the Cold War. A quarter (0.9 points) is reduction in net interest expense, as interest rates fell and so did the size of the public debt relative to GDP. Other key contributors were declines in non-defense discretionary spending (0.4 points) and in Social Security (0.5 points), the latter likely attributable to favorable demographics, as the Baby Boomers were in a peak earning period while a relatively smaller generation was retired.

 

In other words, the Norquist pledge had little if anything to do with the healthy fiscal position of the 1990s. And when it really mattered — during the Bush era, with its simultaneous wars and spike in spending — it was a limp slice of Swiss cheese. Congress lowered tax rates, while spending went up, up, up. Rather than inducing lawmakers to hold the line on the size of government, it served as an excuse to charge the binge to the federal Mastercard.

 

In retrospect, the Norquist anti-tax pledge was an emblem of blind-spot budgeting: it focused on revenue inputs and … what — hoped for the best on outputs?

 

The Republicans who have thus far publicly broken with Norquist have done so in the name of holistic budgeting — getting spending more in line with revenue. They realize that a deal with Democrats on revenue will create room for compromise on entitlements. Yielding on taxes, in other words, will accomplish the goal of actually shrinking government as a share of the economy.

 

If Norquist loses, logic wins.

 


Via Michael Charney, Eric Byler
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More on the Right Wing Media Claim that Media Belongs to Left Wing

More on the Right Wing Media Claim that Media Belongs to Left Wing | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it

by Eric Byler  

 

I wrote this in the chat room during an outstanding episode of Egberto Willies' radio show Politics Done Right:  

 

In other words, if indeed liberals controlled corporate media content for the past 40 years instead of corporate conservatives, the majority of Americans would be convinced that the "media" was dominated by conservatives.  

 

There is alot of misinformation on the Internet, but, because of it, our national discourse is not as dominated by plutocrats as it had been.  The "wisdom of the crowd" is allowing the truth to emerge for the majority of Americans.  And, that majority will grow as more Americans migrate from the boob tube to the Internet, where they have more agency.  

 

And, where they have the ability to connect with and organize with one another.  

 

Under the old model, we were all isolated in our homes, consuming corporate (conservative) media products, thinking they were liberal media products.   

 

Isolated is the operative word. We're not isolated any more. Look at us right now. Listen to podcast: http://bit.ly/Ql4joc


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More on the Right Wing Media Claim that Media Belongs to Left Wing

More on the Right Wing Media Claim that Media Belongs to Left Wing | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it

by Eric Byler  

 

I wrote this in the chat room during an outstanding episode of Egberto Willies' radio show Politics Done Right:  

 

In other words, if indeed liberals controlled corporate media content for the past 40 years instead of corporate conservatives, the majority of Americans would be convinced that the "media" was dominated by conservatives.  

 

There is alot of misinformation on the Internet, but, because of it, our national discourse is not as dominated by plutocrats as it had been.  The "wisdom of the crowd" is allowing the truth to emerge for the majority of Americans.  And, that majority will grow as more Americans migrate from the boob tube to the Internet, where they have more agency.  

 

And, where they have the ability to connect with and organize with one another.  

 

Under the old model, we were all isolated in our homes, consuming corporate (conservative) media products, thinking they were liberal media products.   

 

Isolated is the operative word. We're not isolated any more. Look at us right now. Listen to podcast: http://bit.ly/Ql4joc


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In European Crisis, Iceland Emerges as an Island of Recovery

In European Crisis, Iceland Emerges as an Island of Recovery | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it
Thanks to the devalued krona, the country has turned its trade deficit into a surplus and smoothed its recovery...
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Colbert's Plan to Unload $800K in Super PAC Money | Campaign Trail - Advertising Age

Colbert's Plan to Unload $800K in Super PAC Money | Campaign Trail - Advertising Age | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it

by SIMON DUMENCO, AdAge

"Stephen colbert's lawyer helps him find a solution for $800,000 in leftover super pac money."

 

 

If this doesn't convince us that Citizens United is the worst Supreme Court decision of the modern era, then I suspect that nothing ever will. Some serious overhaul of the tax code is absolutely required but should have nothing to do with mortgage interest deductions and other codes which benefit middle class and poor citizens. Those are not tax expenditures that ought to even be part of the discussion about "tax loop holes." The only loop holes that need closing are the loopholes that benefit rich corporations and individuals earning $250,000.00 or more in taxable income.

 

Big money has completely corrupted our electoral process, our elected officials, and even appointed officials like Supreme Court Justices who were once thought to be above such influences. Unless and until big money is taken out of politics, those of us outside the 1% will continue to be just chattel. - Greg Russak


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There IS a Cure For Electile Dysfunction!

There IS a Cure For Electile Dysfunction! | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it
Help today... far too many suffer needlessly...

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About Citizens for Self Governance / Mission | Citizens For Self Governance

About Citizens for Self Governance / Mission | Citizens For Self Governance | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it

Citizens for Self Governance’ Mission is to return American governmental power to the people; devolving it from the Federal to the State and Local level as appropriate.

We also focus on reducing the influence large public and private institutions have on government[1].

Our reach is across the entire political spectrum. We intend to break the Right vs. Left Paradigm in American politics.

This will be done by engaging the Citizens and providing information, resources and access to amplify the voices of the people.

As a result, we intend to disperse power and break the cycle of incumbency when that incumbency doesn’t represent the will of the people.


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How to lose a congressional bid, On The Cheap

How to lose a congressional bid, On The Cheap | How to lose a (cheap) campaign | Scoop.it
A few weeks ago we visited our friends at the Lehigh County Senior Center to serve some coffee we made without electricity. They loved it. We're just not sure if they loved it because it was free,...
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