How the brain learns
4 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from The Brain and Learning
Scoop.it!

The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect

The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect

Via Tom Perran, Sally DeCost
more...
Audrey's comment, September 9, 2013 6:01 AM
Yes.... Start young. This means pre-school education.
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from The Brain and Learning
Scoop.it!

Brain-based learning | Education in America

Brain-based learning | Education in America | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
The advantages of using brain-based learning in the classroom are significant.

Via Sally DeCost
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Ellis
Scoop.it!

Fiala on ethics: Brain hackers raise social questions about learning ... - Fresno Bee

Fiala on ethics: Brain hackers raise social questions about learning ... - Fresno Bee | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
Fiala on ethics: Brain hackers raise social questions about learning ...
Fresno Bee
One might also worry that the learning that occurs through brain hacking doesn't really count. It seems like cheating.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from Neuroscience_topics
Scoop.it!

A Model of Functional Brain Connectivity and Background Noise as a Biomarker for Cognitive Phenotypes: Application to Autism

A Model of Functional Brain Connectivity and Background Noise as a Biomarker for Cognitive Phenotypes: Application to Autism | How the brain learns | Scoop.it

We present an efficient approach to discriminate between typical and atypical brains from macroscopic neural dynamics recorded as magnetoencephalograms (MEG). Our approach is based on the fact that spontaneous brain activity can be accurately described with stochastic dynamics, as a multivariate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process (mOUP). By fitting the data to a mOUP we obtain: 1) the functional connectivity matrix, corresponding to the drift operator, and 2) the traces of background stochastic activity (noise) driving the brain. We applied this method to investigate functional connectivity and background noise in juvenile patients (n = 9) with Asperger’s syndrome, a form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and compared them to age-matched juvenile control subjects (n = 10). Our analysis reveals significant alterations in both functional brain connectivity and background noise in ASD patients. The dominant connectivity change in ASD relative to control shows enhanced functional excitation from occipital to frontal areas along a parasagittal axis. Background noise in ASD patients is spatially correlated over wide areas, as opposed to control, where areas driven by correlated noise form smaller patches. An analysis of the spatial complexity reveals that it is significantly lower in ASD subjects. Although the detailed physiological mechanisms underlying these alterations cannot be determined from macroscopic brain recordings, we speculate that enhanced occipital-frontal excitation may result from changes in white matter density in ASD, as suggested in previous studies. We also venture that long-range spatial correlations in the background noise may result from less specificity (or more promiscuity) of thalamo-cortical projections. All the calculations involved in our analysis are highly efficient and outperform other algorithms to discriminate typical and atypical brains with a comparable level of accuracy. Altogether our results demonstrate a promising potential of our approach as an efficient biomarker for altered brain dynamics associated with a cognitive phenotype. (...) - by Dominguer LG et al., PLoS ONE 8(4): e61493


Via Julien Hering, PhD
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Ellis
Scoop.it!

Brain Herbs | Herbal Remedies Info

Brain Herbs | Herbal Remedies Info | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
Native Remedies Social Media Team Member Alex Demonstrates Various Ways to Take Focus Formula™ to Help Improve Your Concentration and Attention Span. (Herbal Remedies: "How To Increase The Power Of Your Memory With Brain Herbs!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Ellis
Scoop.it!

The Secret to Learning Anything: Albert Einstein's ... - Brain Pickings

The Secret to Learning Anything: Albert Einstein's ... - Brain Pickings | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
A library of cross-disciplinary interestingness and combinatorial creativity.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from The Brain and Learning
Scoop.it!

Education, the Brain and Common Core State Standards

Education, the Brain and Common Core State Standards | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
Understanding even the basics of how the brain learns -- how people perceive, process and remember information -- can help teachers and students successfully meet the requirements of the Common Core

Via Sally DeCost
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from The Brain and Learning
Scoop.it!

Nine Things Educators Need to Know About the Brain, by Louis Cozolino

Nine Things Educators Need to Know About the Brain, by Louis Cozolino | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
Learning is a dynamic function that each person experiences in a vastly different way. For instance, one individual may retain knowledge the best by studying a textbook while another may need to link an idea to a physical activity they perform.

Via Sally DeCost
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from The Brain and Learning
Scoop.it!

Eight Ways of Looking at Intelligence | MindShift

Eight Ways of Looking at Intelligence | MindShift | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
The science of learning can offer some surprising and useful perspectives on how we guide and educate young people.

Via Sally DeCost
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Game-Based Learning - A Look at Why & How to use in your Classroom

Game-Based Learning - A Look at Why & How to use in your Classroom | How the brain learns | Scoop.it

“No TV until you finish that level.”

Can you imagine? Recent research shows that video games, once considered public school enemy number one, might just be one of our greatest assets in delivering an effective education.


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 15, 2013 11:47 PM

If you are considering implementing some game-based learning next year, or you would like read about why game-based learning is being used in classrooms check out this post. A wide range are discussed including:

* How game-based learning works

* The hidden learning that may take when playing games

* Results of a survey from teachers whom use game-based learning in their classroom

* The potential drawbacks

Nancy Jones's curator insight, June 19, 2013 10:03 AM

I strongly believe this is a valuable tool for certain types of learning.

Ryan McDonough's curator insight, July 7, 2014 8:02 AM

Providing the pros and cons of game-based-learning, they portray gaming in a positive light. The value of gaming is stated throughout, pinpointing engagement factors and citing statistics to back up their claims. As an avid gamer myself, I don't need stats to prove anything. I know how addicting they can be. If kids can learn when they don't even realize they're learning, it is referred to as "hidden learning". That's the key. If games like Portal  can be played without kids thinkng they're educational games, then that's good news for parents and educators alike. The fact of the matter is Portal is a very challenging puzzle game that requires careful planning and attention to move up levels.

Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Brain Networks of Explicit and Implicit Learning

Brain Networks of Explicit and Implicit Learning | How the brain learns | Scoop.it

Are explicit versus implicit learning mechanisms reflected in the brain as distinct neural structures, as previous research indicates, or are they distinguished by brain networks that involve overlapping systems with differential connectivity? In this functional MRI study we examined the neural correlates of explicit and implicit learning of artificial grammar sequences. Using effective connectivity analyses we found that brain networks of different connectivity underlie the two types of learning: while both processes involve activation in a set of cortical and subcortical structures, explicit learners engage a network that uses the insula as a key mediator whereas implicit learners evoke a direct frontal-striatal network. Individual differences in working memory also differentially impact the two types of sequence learning.


Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Learning foreign languages triggers brain growth

Learning foreign languages triggers brain growth | How the brain learns | Scoop.it

Learning foreign languages triggers brain growth


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

The Differences Between Projects And Project-Based Learning - Edudemic

The Differences Between Projects And Project-Based Learning - Edudemic | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
There's a big difference between using projects in the classroom versus project-based learning in the classroom. What are those differences, you ask?

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
Sue Alexander's curator insight, June 15, 2013 10:29 AM

Art teachers know projects, but do we know how to take it to the next level?  PBL engages students in those higher order skills and processes needed for college and career readiness .This chart illustrates how we can move our lessons from doing art to creating it.

Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from The Brain and Learning
Scoop.it!

18 Blogs Explain Brain Breaks and Why they are Important

18 Blogs Explain Brain Breaks and Why they are Important | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
As an adult, you've likely experienced a time when you've been in a training session or a meeting and felt like you were at a breaking point and couldn't focus

Via Deborah McNelis, M.Ed, Sally DeCost
more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, July 6, 2013 10:03 PM

Wow.  Important information here (and lots of resources!).

 

"When kids get tired or bored, they tend to check out.  Once kids begin to check out they are no longer learning, and they mentally are removed from the situation despite being physically present.  It’s important to get their blood flowing and to reconnect those kids that have started day dreaming instead of listening to the lesson.  These six blog posts can explain more about the importance of brain breaks for kids and adults."

Scooped by Rebecca Ellis
Scoop.it!

Canada-Israel Symposium: Brain Plasticity, Learning and Education ...

Canada-Israel Symposium: Brain Plasticity, Learning and Education ... | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
Scholars from Canada and Israel gathered to discuss research and challenges related to brain plasticity, learning and education. The topics ran the gamut from molecular neuroscience to behavioural psychology to education.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Ellis
Scoop.it!

Brain Glitches- Learning to Lift the Needle | God's Surprising Treasures

Brain Glitches- Learning to Lift the Needle | God's Surprising Treasures | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
RT @CindyBarclay: Brain Glitches- Learning to Lift the Needle #specialneeds #brainFreeze http://t.co/yixDJH3XJQ
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from Bodybuilding & Fitness
Scoop.it!

Exercising Leadership Skills: 5 Tips for Working Out Your Brain

Exercising Leadership Skills: 5 Tips for  Working Out Your Brain | How the brain learns | Scoop.it

Graphic and content quoted from LifeSpan Fitness!


Via AlGonzalezinfo
more...
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, June 11, 2013 9:10 PM

This is my first of a series of articles connecting fitness and exercise to our ability to lead.  As a bodybuilder and leadership practioner, I am loving the opportunity to connect these dots!!!

 

From the article:

 

Exercise can improve your brain function!


Studies conducted have provided insight into the effect exercising has on improving the function of our brains.

 

While improving the way our body breaks down and uses the healthier, more nutritious food we are consuming, the brain also enjoys various other benefits.

John Michel's curator insight, June 12, 2013 6:18 AM

The better your ability to think clearly, analyze options, and remember details, the better you will be able to lead. This ability applies whether you are leading an established team, your family, or starting a new business.

AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, June 29, 2013 9:12 AM

It's true, working out makes us better leaders by helping our brains!

Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

A Workout for Your Brain, on Your Smartphone

A Workout for Your Brain, on Your Smartphone | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
Android and Apple apps allow you to play games to help improve your memory and brain plasticity, and track your performance.

Via John Evans
more...
AnnC's curator insight, June 14, 2013 6:28 PM

more possibilities for iPhone than for Android but still worth considering for making idle time productive and entertaining

Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from The Brain and Learning
Scoop.it!

Critical thinking and analytical thinking are not the same thing!

Critical thinking and analytical thinking are not the same thing! | How the brain learns | Scoop.it

Critical thinking and analytical thinking are not the same thing. To clarify the difference between these words, let's look at their etymology (word origins). According to the dictionary, "analyze" means to break apart into essential elements. The opposite of analyze is synthesize, or put together. "Criticize" means to evaluate or make a judgment regarding the merits or faults. The opposite of criticize in one sense would be praise, or in another sense absence of judgment. Simply looking at the two definitions, it is glaringly obvious that two different skill sets are required. So why are they often lumped together? The dictionary definition of this answer would be a stupor of thought, or the condition of not thinking.


Via Mel Riddile, Sally DeCost
more...
Charles Fischer's curator insight, May 22, 2013 6:04 AM

There are many types of thinking! It's extremely important to first recognize a variety, whether through Multiple Intelligences, Bloom's Taxonomy or another lens. Then students need opportunities to practice, practice, practice.

Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from The Brain and Learning
Scoop.it!

The Simple Things I Do To Promote Brain-Based Learning In My Classroom

The Simple Things I Do To Promote Brain-Based Learning In My Classroom | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
You don't have to be a neuroscientist to promote brain-based learning in your classroom. In fact, it's really quite simple.

Via Sally DeCost
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from The Brain and Learning
Scoop.it!

Why Music Makes Our Brain Sing

Why Music Makes Our Brain Sing | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
When a song triggers both anticipation and reward, it moves us like nothing else.

Via Sally DeCost
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from The Brain and Learning
Scoop.it!

18 Blogs Explain Brain Breaks and Why they are Important

18 Blogs Explain Brain Breaks and Why they are Important | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
As an adult, you've likely experienced a time when you've been in a training session or a meeting and felt like you were at a breaking point and couldn't focus

Via Deborah McNelis, M.Ed, Sally DeCost
more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, July 6, 2013 10:03 PM

Wow.  Important information here (and lots of resources!).

 

"When kids get tired or bored, they tend to check out.  Once kids begin to check out they are no longer learning, and they mentally are removed from the situation despite being physically present.  It’s important to get their blood flowing and to reconnect those kids that have started day dreaming instead of listening to the lesson.  These six blog posts can explain more about the importance of brain breaks for kids and adults."

Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

The Summer of Learning - Udemy courses discounted to $10 this summer!

The Summer of Learning - Udemy courses discounted to $10 this summer! | How the brain learns | Scoop.it
Udemy is the world's largest destination for online courses. Discover an online course on Udemy.com and start learning a new skill today.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Stop Telling Your Students To "Pay attention!" | Brain Based Learning | Brain Based Teaching | Articles From Jensen Learning

Stop Telling Your Students To "Pay attention!" | Brain Based Learning | Brain Based Teaching | Articles From Jensen Learning | How the brain learns | Scoop.it

What happens when you tell your students to "pay attention!" More than you may think. This post explores what goes on in the brain and ways the brain pays attention. Research is shared as well as what you can do in your classroom immediately as well what you can do in the long term.
Short term solutions include "using prediction; using the brief pause and chunk technique; priming the learning with small hints, appetizers and teasers" and more.

You may also choose to view a video of a session "Teaching with the Brain in Mind" at http://www.scilearn.com/company/webinars/ (you will need to scroll down the page to find the link).


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Debra Evans's curator insight, October 2, 2013 6:08 PM

Useful

Ruth Virginia Barton's curator insight, February 13, 2015 10:37 AM

"Instead of saying to students, “Pay attention!” what you really want to say is, “Suppress interesting things!” Why? Students already DO pay attention."  The point being, prolonged attention paying is a learned skill, practiced.  Intersperse teaching with stand-up breaks, quick physical activity.  Create "hooks' for attention - previews - and offer rewards - like homework free pass this month - for students who get it right; helps them be invested in topic

Rescooped by Rebecca Ellis from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Learning to learn: a series on hacking your own brain | Ally Greer Blog | Scoop.it!

Learning to learn: a series on hacking your own brain | Ally Greer Blog | Scoop.it! | How the brain learns | Scoop.it

 

I recently partook in a discussion among some fellow community managers on the best ways to learn about the industry and how to train its future generations. When the conversation reached the point where we all shared the “training” we went through ourselves, the answers began getting interesting.

 

“I studied marketing in college.”

 

“I studied communications and the art of rhetoric.”

 

“The job I’ve had that contributed most to the development of my community management skills was being a community manager.”

 

“My social life and interactions with others have been one of the biggest contributors to my professional skill set.”

 

It’s no secret that there just isn’t a degree to be earned in social media or community management. In fact, I graduated college one short year ago, and never even knew that this extensive professional field existed until I was thrown into it.

 

The reality is, this isn’t only the case for community management. It’s the case for SEO. It’s the case for entrepreneurship. It’s the case for social advertising and Internet marketing. We’re living in the transition phase from analog to digital; from broadcasting to social conversing.

 

How, then, can we find the proper education and training to become experts in these fields? Though there’s not one training program fit for everyone, there is one thing we can all do: learn how to learn.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
Ally Greer's comment, May 9, 2013 3:39 PM
Thanks for sharing, Chuck!