How has civil rights law given voice to those without one
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A Brief History of Civil Rights Legislation - TheBlaze.com

A Brief History of Civil Rights Legislation - TheBlaze.com | How has civil rights law given voice to those without one | Scoop.it
TheBlaze.com
A Brief History of Civil Rights Legislation
TheBlaze.com
The first major civil rights law was actually passed in 1866, right after the conclusion of the Civil War and nearly 100 years before the C.R.A.
Gabriel Murrieta's insight:

 Civil rights have been around since even before the emancipation proclamation. Since then however, needless to say, things have changed. and through it all, the practice of civil rights as a whole has progressed. Civil rights and the practice of civil rights law has given a stronger voice to those who did not have one to begin with. Civil rights has given to the politically marginalized: freedom, the right to vote, and greater mobility in the social ladder. There will always be problems involving this kind of race and bigotry, but as long as there will be, there will always be people willing to stand up for the rights of others. This is what civil rights law is really all about

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Gathering Of Aging Activists Recalls A Protest And A Federal Law That Changed ... - St. Louis Public Radio

Gathering Of Aging Activists Recalls A Protest And A Federal Law That Changed ... - St. Louis Public Radio | How has civil rights law given voice to those without one | Scoop.it
Gathering Of Aging Activists Recalls A Protest And A Federal Law That Changed ...
St. Louis Public Radio
She was one of three rights leaders that the Bar Association of Metropolitan St.
Gabriel Murrieta's insight:

In many ways, the whole way that civil rights works happens when somebody or a group of people decide that they will no longer take any more of whatever injustice is being served to them. Much like time itself, when even the smallest of things change or become tweaked, the entire outcome can be completely different, and all it takes is just for someone to put their foot down. Through civil rights law, no one has to be alone in their quest for change, fighting alongside those who are willing and brave enough to say something that might change not only their own life, but the lives of many others. To break away from the social or political "norm" that they have been placed in. All they need to do is finally say enough.

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The Brown Daily Herald - Obama curtails civil liberties, says rights lawyer

Civil liberties are nothing more than the list of things the government is not allowed to do, said Glenn Greenwald, a former constitutional law and civil rights lawyer, in his lecture before a full Salomon 001 last night.


Via dMaculate
Gabriel Murrieta's insight:

Because many people from different countries, cultures, faiths and beliefs come to the U.S. it has become a growing issue that people must be treated fairly. If this country is to be one unified nation. Then it is imperative that all people be treated equally. After all, who does't deserve to be treated equal. Civil rights lawyers ensure that all people have the opportunity to receive fair treatment by the government and through the federal law. When people are treated fairly, then that is giving minorities and other politically marginalized people an opportunity to climb up a social ladder that otherwise may have seemed insurmountable.   

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Will America Once More Turn Its Back on Civil Rights? - The Nation. (blog)

Will America Once More Turn Its Back on Civil Rights? - The Nation. (blog) | How has civil rights law given voice to those without one | Scoop.it
Will America Once More Turn Its Back on Civil Rights?
The Nation. (blog)
The first Reconstruction began with the Civil War and ended with the passage of the civil rights amendments ending slavery and guaranteeing equal protection under the law.
Gabriel Murrieta's insight:

Fifty years after the famous march on Washington led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. hundreds of students from Howard university, the vast majority of them black, commemorated the occasion by marching themselves, on the same path. This act of commemoration, of full immortalization and appreciation says clearly that people are willing to commemorate men and women, both white and black, who stood up for their rights. Why should they have to be alone, the practice of civil rights law is dedicated to serving the politically marginalized in a meaningful and sustaining way. By standing up for people's rights today, everyone can give equal voice to those without any political voice. 

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The Battle to Pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - Vanity Fair

The Battle to Pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - Vanity Fair | How has civil rights law given voice to those without one | Scoop.it
Vanity Fair
The Battle to Pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Vanity Fair
In his new book An Idea Whose Time Has Come veteran Vanity Fair correspondent Todd S.
Gabriel Murrieta's insight:

The passing of the 1964 civil rights act stands as a great and shining example of how much a country as a nation can progress when people are given equal opportunity. Unfortunately, though blacks and many other political minorities are still discriminated against, the civil rights act shows just how much a nation as a whole can benefit from equal opportunities. Although the opportunities that are given to majorities is far different than the opportunities given to minorities, we would be in far, far worse condition had this act not been signed.  

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