How does the internet affect self-image?
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How does the internet affect self-image?
The question of identity seems to be peaking these days, in almost any sense of the word, such as: cultural splits, being defined how you're perceived by others, submission to trends/characters (I'll just end up like my father/mother), if having two dads/moms means you're doomed, the blemish of the riots in Sweden, and of course the usual "who am I" question. Today, however, there is also the question of an online identity, and how these reflects and relates to you. A misunderstanding that could inhibit progress of this early on is that online is not reality, but it's actually an extension of your reality, and of your personality. While I personally don't see the question of identity as overly complicated as most make it out to be, it is nonetheless interesting to explore different facets of it, here as it relates to the internet, for it's evident that not only does it seem to cause more strife with self-image in an offline sense, but it's also blurring the line between your projection online and offline - perhaps because there is no line.
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Drones With Facial Recognition Technology Will End Anonymity, Everywhere

Drones With Facial Recognition Technology Will End Anonymity, Everywhere | How does the internet affect self-image? | Scoop.it
"We're basically decoding the face."
Daniel Heater's insight:

On the other hand, self-image might be the last thing you want in existence on the internet. I want to highlight a couple things: << Funded by the Department of Defense's Biometrics Identity Management Agency, the camera could be mounted to the entry point of a military base or embassy to identify visitors before they're close enough to attack. >> Assumption that visitors... will attack. Right. Next: << Not to worry, said Nita Farahany, a Duke University law professor who specializes in digital privacy. The U.S. Constitution will keep the government from peering into homes, and state laws block Peeping Toms. >> Given that the Constitution isn't stopping a lot of current events and state laws tend to work in favor of police, and in conjunction with the militarized mindset, I think this is the perfect example of a digital atomic bomb. To the inventor: Just stop, and reverse, and forget abou- BOOOOOOOM

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Tumblr Tuesdays: Genius In A Bottle

Tumblr Tuesdays: Genius In A Bottle | How does the internet affect self-image? | Scoop.it
There apparently exists a sort of trend in China right now where people submit every day, ho-hum ...
Daniel Heater's insight:

Finally, the pithy "be careful what you wish for" is applicable online now. I'm sure the article is holding back on hundreds of other examples, but it seems that people aren't content with being themselves, or with natural appearance; they must be artificially improved, they must appear more "cool" to make their reality...oh yeah it doesn't affect that at all. What I like about this is that, at least the China example, online users are providing satirical lessons of humbleness, and it's not so much whether or not it works on these particular people making the requests but that it's extremely obvious to any other observer what is taking place, thus being a sort of 5-second education/reminder of an important virtue. Facilitative learning ftw?

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Dare to Question My Identity or Where I Come From: Steve Sabella at TEDxMarrakesh 2012

STEVE SABELLA born in Jerusalem in 1975, is a Berlin based artist who uses photography and photography installations as his principle modes of expression. He...
Daniel Heater's insight:

This is a bit more abstract of a "scoop" for the video doesn't directly speak of online identity, yet Sabella discusses a yearning for expressing identity through image (he chooses natural collage), and using this expression to learn where oneself is at, as well as the claim "our image needs not only visual liberation, but a vast amount of visual correction." The way people adapt their identities online - depending on the website, the circumstance, and especially who they perceive that they are at this point in time - is applicable in a few ways. The liberation we think we have is obstructed by 1) changing identity - via imagrey, tone of speech, or veiling knowledge, and 2) trepidation over who sees what. The visual correction Sabella speaks on can be that of addressing these two obstructions towards visual liberation. 

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Career Truth #1: Brand Or Be Branded | CAREEREALISM

Career Truth #1: Brand Or Be Branded | CAREEREALISM | How does the internet affect self-image? | Scoop.it
Brand or be branded. Why risk having a lack of any career identity or a bad online presence just because you didn’t take control of the situation?
Daniel Heater's insight:

From more of a professional perspective, the idea here is that you can choose how people see you online. Not terribly inconspicuous, but also not exploited too often, given how many people seem to have trouble promoting a positive impression from a quick google search. You can choose your online identity, from a career standpoint, by essentially doing more than posting on Facebook; the article recommends becoming active in being a mature commentator via twitter, blogs, your own method of posting (maybe a scoop.it account?), thus showing you as someone who cares about your field and does more online than the usual. It also reminds me of Naomi Klein's No Logo, where this article is promoting the social vehicle of being labelled incessantly. It's not fair, but it's not avoidable either...at least until people realize that profiling is a hollow estimation.

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Cyber Body Image & Self-Esteem

Cyber Body Image & Self-Esteem | How does the internet affect self-image? | Scoop.it
Learn how Facebook, Twitter, and other social media sites are changing the ways we think of our body image and the ways we communicate and express emotions.
Daniel Heater's insight:

This article points out the common occurence of cyber-ID not being reflective of the person it represents. This comes into play with younger people still trying to find themselves, yet the social tether to SNs and faking beauty is severely damaging for everyone. Too many people use online photos for the sake of what other people will think, and this leads to struggles "with self-esttem and poor body image." Based on the amount of hours cited in the article, it's an obsession over things that aren't truths. This affects how new, and possibly involved older generations function in the real world, in terms of how they communicate (overthinking wording, changing diction to suit the other person's perception), how they deal with provocation (either succumbing to it at a worse rate than before or completely overreacting out of habit), and how they deal with knowledge (non-sequiturs, imagined facts, retaining information), thus the idea of finding one's identity becomes a joke.

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Facebook's identity problem: Teens hate a permanent record

Facebook's identity problem: Teens hate a permanent record | How does the internet affect self-image? | Scoop.it
Facebook’s need to deliver detailed marketable profiles clashes with the teen’s freedom to change their minds – and identities – with just a couple of clicks
Daniel Heater's insight:

Facebook is actually a less immediate tool for interaction than things like Snapchat or Tumblr, causing a gravitation away from the permanence of Facebook record, an implication that younger people don't like the idea that their identity is a static thing rather than a continually revamped entity.  Are younger people even accurate to think their identity is transient? Does this show that people are looking to constantly change their identity if it happens to suit the situation?

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