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Scooped by Damien Meyer
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Structure of a pathogenic type 3 secretion system in action

Structure of a pathogenic type 3 secretion system in action | Host and Microbe | Scoop.it
Scooped from: Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, 2013 Authors: Julia Radics, Lisa Königsmaier and Thomas C Marlovits Summary: Type 3 secretion systems use 3.5-megadalton syringe-like, membrane-embedded 'injectisomes', each containing an ~800-Å-long needle complex to connect intracellular compartments of infectious bacteria and hosts. Here we identify requirements for substrate association with, transport through and exit from the injectisome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This guided the design of substrates that become trapped within the secretion path and enabled visualization of injectisomes in action in situ. We used cryo-EM to define the secretion path, providing a structural explanation as to why effector proteins must be unfolded during transport. Furthermore, trapping of a heterologous substrate in the needle prevents secretion of natural bacterial effectors. Together, the data reveal the path of protein secretion across multiple membranes and show that mechanisms rejecting unacceptable substrates can be undermined, and transport of bacterial effectors across an already assembled type 3 secretion system can be inhibited.
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Trends in Microbiology - Subversion of trafficking, apoptosis, and innate immunity by type III secretion system effectors

Trends in Microbiology - Subversion of trafficking, apoptosis, and innate immunity by type III secretion system effectors | Host and Microbe | Scoop.it
Injection of effector proteins by a type III secretion system (T3SS) is a common infection strategy employed by many important human pathogens, including enteric Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Yersinia, and Shigella, to subvert cell signaling and host responses. In recent years, great advances have been made in understanding how the T3SS effectors function and execute the diverse infection strategies employed by these pathogens. In this review, we focus on effectors that subvert signaling pathways that impact on endosomal trafficking, cell survival, and innate immunity, particularly phagocytosis, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways and the inflammasome.
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PLOS ONE: xopAC-triggered Immunity against Xanthomonas Depends on Arabidopsis Receptor-Like Cytoplasmic Kinase Genes PBL2 and RIPK

PLOS ONE: xopAC-triggered Immunity against Xanthomonas Depends on Arabidopsis Receptor-Like Cytoplasmic Kinase Genes PBL2 and RIPK | Host and Microbe | Scoop.it
Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) colonizes the vascular system of Brassicaceaeand ultimately causes black rot. In susceptible Arabidopsis plants, XopAC type III effector inhibits by uridylylation positive regulators of the PAMP-triggered immunity such as the receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases (RLCK) BIK1 and PBL1. In the resistant ecotype Col-0,xopAC is a major avirulence gene of Xcc. In this study, we show that both the RLCK interaction domain and the uridylyl transferase domain of XopAC are required for avirulence. Furthermore,xopAC can also confer avirulence to both the vascular pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and the mesophyll-colonizing pathogen Pseudomonas syringae indicating that xopAC-specified effector-triggered immunity is not specific to the vascular system. In planta, XopAC-YFP fusions are localized at the plasma membrane suggesting that XopAC might interact with membrane-localized proteins. Eight RLCK of subfamily VII predicted to be localized at the plasma membrane and interacting with XopAC in yeast two-hybrid assays have been isolated. Within this subfamily, PBL2 and RIPK RLCK genes but not BIK1 are important for xopAC-specified effector-triggered immunity and Arabidopsis resistance to Xcc.
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PLOS ONE: An Improved Method for TAL Effectors DNA-Binding Sites Prediction Reveals Functional Convergence in TAL Repertoires of Xanthomonas oryzae Strains

PLOS ONE: An Improved Method for TAL Effectors DNA-Binding Sites Prediction Reveals Functional Convergence in TAL Repertoires of Xanthomonas oryzae Strains | Host and Microbe | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
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Novel bacterial 'language' discovered - Phys.Org

Novel bacterial 'language' discovered - Phys.Org | Host and Microbe | Scoop.it
Novel bacterial 'language' discovered Phys.Org Since those drugs would only prevent the expression of pathogenic traits, rather than killing bacteria as antibiotics do, the danger of drug resistances would be enormously diminished.
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Programmable repression and activation of bacterial gene expression using an engineered CRISPR-Cas system

Programmable repression and activation of bacterial gene expression using an engineered CRISPR-Cas system | Host and Microbe | Scoop.it
Scooped from: Nucleic Acid Research, 2013 (via @Socrates_Logos) Authors: David Bikard, Wenyan Jiang, Poulami Samai, Ann Hochschild, Feng Zhang and Luciano A. Marraffini Summary: The ability to artificially control transcription is essential both to the study of gene function and to the construction of synthetic gene networks with desired properties. Cas9 is an RNA-guided double-stranded DNA nuclease that participates in the CRISPR-Cas immune defense against prokaryotic viruses. We describe the use of a Cas9 nuclease mutant that retains DNA-binding activity and can be engineered as a programmable transcription repressor by preventing the binding of the RNA polymerase (RNAP) to promoter sequences or as a transcription terminator by blocking the running RNAP. In addition, a fusion between the omega subunit of the RNAP and a Cas9 nuclease mutant directed to bind upstream promoter regions can achieve programmable transcription activation. The simple and efficient modulation of gene expression achieved by this technology is a useful asset for the study of gene networks and for the development of synthetic biology and biotechnological applications
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Video: Xanthomonas-plant interactions (2012)


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Abigail Rumsey's comment, November 13, 2013 10:46 AM
Very cool. This would be good to explain how plant diseases work even to people that don't know anything about plant pathology (if you took out all of the highly scientific words!).
Teresa M. Nash's comment, November 28, 2013 1:34 AM
thanks for this.
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Pivoting the Plant Immune System from Dissection to Deployment

Pivoting the Plant Immune System from Dissection to Deployment | Host and Microbe | Scoop.it
Diverse and rapidly evolving pathogens cause plant diseases and epidemics that threaten crop yield and food security around the world. Research over the last 25 years has led to an increasingly clear conceptual understanding of the molecular components of the plant immune system. Combined with ever-cheaper DNA-sequencing technology and the rich diversity of germ plasm manipulated for over a century by plant breeders, we now have the means to begin development of durable (long-lasting) disease resistance beyond the limits imposed by conventional breeding and in a manner that will replace costly and unsustainable chemical controls.
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PLOS ONE: Effector Protein Translocation by the Coxiella burnetii ...

PLOS ONE: Effector Protein Translocation by the Coxiella burnetii ... | Host and Microbe | Scoop.it
Abstract. The human pathogen Coxiella burnetii encodes a type IV secretion system called Dot/Icm that is essential for intracellular replication. The Dot/Icm system delivers bacterial effector proteins into the host cytosol during infection.
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The ISME Journal - Experimental evolution of nodule intracellular infection in legume symbionts

The ISME Journal - Experimental evolution of nodule intracellular infection in legume symbionts | Host and Microbe | Scoop.it
Soil bacteria known as rhizobia are able to establish an endosymbiosis with legumes that takes place in neoformed nodules in which intracellularly hosted bacteria fix nitrogen. Intracellular accommodation that facilitates nutrient exchange between the two partners and protects bacteria from plant defense reactions has been a major evolutionary step towards mutualism. Yet the forces that drove the selection of the late event of intracellular infection during rhizobium evolution are unknown. To address this question, we took advantage of the previous conversion of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum into a legume-nodulating bacterium that infected nodules only extracellularly. We experimentally evolved this draft rhizobium into intracellular endosymbionts using serial cycles of legume-bacterium cocultures. The three derived lineages rapidly gained intracellular infection capacity, revealing that the legume is a highly selective environment for the evolution of this trait. From genome resequencing, we identified in each lineage a mutation responsible for the extracellular–intracellular transition. All three mutations target virulence regulators, strongly suggesting that several virulence-associated functions interfere with intracellular infection. We provide evidence that the adaptive mutations were selected for their positive effect on nodulation. Moreover, we showed that inactivation of the type three secretion system of R. solanacearum that initially allowed the ancestral draft rhizobium to nodulate, was also required to permit intracellular infection, suggesting a similar checkpoint for bacterial invasion at the early nodulation/root infection and late nodule cell entry levels. We discuss our findings with respect to the spread and maintenance of intracellular infection in rhizobial lineages during evolutionary times.
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Chromosomal deletions and inversions mediated by TALENs and CRISPR/Cas in zebrafish

Chromosomal deletions and inversions mediated by TALENs and CRISPR/Cas in zebrafish | Host and Microbe | Scoop.it
Scooped from: Nucleic Acid Research, 2013 (via Amir Taheri Ghahfarokhi and Clem Stanyon) Authors: An Xiao, Zhanxiang Wang, Yingying Hu, Yingdan Wu, Zhou Luo, Zhipeng Yang, Yao Zu, Wenyuan Li, Peng Huang, Xiangjun Tong, Zuoyan Zhu, Shuo Lin and Bo Zhang Summary: Customized TALENs and Cas9/gRNAs have been used for targeted mutagenesis in zebrafish to induce indels into protein-coding genes. However, indels are usually not sufficient to disrupt the function of non-coding genes, gene clusters or regulatory sequences, whereas large genomic deletions or inversions are more desirable for this purpose. By injecting two pairs of TALEN mRNAs or two gRNAs together with Cas9 mRNA targeting distal DNA sites of the same chromosome, we obtained predictable genomic deletions or inversions with sizes ranging from several hundred bases to nearly 1 Mb. We have successfully achieved this type of modifications for 11 chromosomal loci by TALENs and 2 by Cas9/gRNAs with different combinations of gRNA pairs, including clusters of miRNA and protein-coding genes. Seven of eight TALEN-targeted lines transmitted the deletions and one transmitted the inversion through germ line. Our findings indicate that both TALENs and Cas9/gRNAs can be used as an efficient tool to engineer genomes to achieve large deletions or inversions, including fragments covering multiple genes and non-coding sequences. To facilitate the analyses and application of existing ZFN, TALEN and CRISPR/Cas data, we have updated our EENdb database to provide a chromosomal view of all reported engineered endonucleases targeting human and zebrafish genomes.
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Nature Communications: Two distinct secretion systems facilitate tissue invasion by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (2013)

Nature Communications: Two distinct secretion systems facilitate tissue invasion by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (2013) | Host and Microbe | Scoop.it

To cause plant diseases, pathogenic micro-organisms secrete effector proteins into host tissue to suppress immunity and support pathogen growth. Bacterial pathogens have evolved several distinct secretion systems to target effector proteins, but whether fungi, which cause the major diseases of most crop species, also require different secretory mechanisms is not known. Here we report that the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae possesses two distinct secretion systems to target effectors during plant infection. Cytoplasmic effectors, which are delivered into host cells, preferentially accumulate in the biotrophic interfacial complex, a novel plant membrane-rich structure associated with invasive hyphae. We show that the biotrophic interfacial complex is associated with a novel form of secretion involving exocyst components and the Sso1 t-SNARE. By contrast, effectors that are secreted from invasive hyphae into the extracellular compartment follow the conventional secretory pathway. We conclude that the blast fungus has evolved distinct secretion systems to facilitate tissue invasion.


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