Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing
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Building Buyer Personas

Building Buyer Personas | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Learn how to build buyer personas of the team of decision makers you face when selling health IT.

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One of the keys to successful health IT marketing involves customizing your content for all of your audiences. Many digital health firms now create content for early-, mid- and late-stage leads, yet miss opportunities to engage all of their buyers and purchase influencers.

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The Top Medical Specialties with the Biggest Potential in the Future - The Medical Futurist

The Top Medical Specialties with the Biggest Potential in the Future - The Medical Futurist | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence, wearable sensors, virtual reality, medical robots are changing the way patients and doctors think and act about healthcare.
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AI beats best cardiologists at detecting most arrhythmias

AI beats best cardiologists at detecting most arrhythmias | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
A team of researchers from Stanford University, working with cardiac monitoring company iRhythm, have created an AI algorithm that, in a small proof-of-concept trial, outperformed board-certified cardiologists at identifying various types of arrhythmias from ECGs.
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The delicate practice of social media for doctors

The delicate practice of social media for doctors | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

A study by researchers at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire, US found that 72% of fresh urology graduates had public Facebook profiles of which 40% contained “potentially objectionable” content.

This included pictures of the doctors’ drunk and medical ethics violations such as revealing their patient’s health information. The study brought to light the concern that a physician’s social media use has the potential to break patient trust.

Lead researcher Dr Kevin Koo said, "we all have a role to play in making sure the high standards of patient confidentiality and the doctor-patient relationship are upheld."

Many have examined the implications of HCPs utilising social media


The issue has been a concern for the medical profession for some time now with many GPs surgeries, hospitals, universities and medical societies creating guidelines on what they deem as inappropriate online behaviour.

For example, the American Medical Association issued guidelines in 2010encouraging doctors to "consider separating personal and professional content online" and reiterated the importance of patient privacy. Despite this, Koo is uncertain how many doctors "even know that guidelines exist."

The study found one case in which a patient’s x-ray and name were included in a social media post. Another study conducted by researchers at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden found that of 13,000 tweets by 237 doctors, 6% were a potential breach of patient confidentiality.

Interestingly, in a study by researchers at the University of California San Francisco, in which 48 medical boards were asked which of ten social media scenarios would prompt an investigation, most said misleading claims about treatment outcomes would. In a separate case in January, a Canadian nurse, who posted about her grandfather’s inadequate care in another clinic, was penalised.

Maintaining a healthy work-personal life balance


It can be difficult not to cross the line into prohibiting a doctor’s right to share their lives or their opinions however as under “potentially objectionable” content, posts expressing views on religion and politics were also included in the New Hampshire study.

“No one expects doctors to never post an opinion,” Koo said. "We realise they don't live in a vacuum.”

Dr Matthew DeCamp, from the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics in Baltimore suggests doctors "ask yourself if this is something you really want in a public space.” Some doctors have mastered this balance well and created stellar social media presences.

Most guidelines seem to contain the same key behavioral rules and recommendations. Firstly all doctors must be accountable for all content posted on any of their social medical accounts. Secondly it is advised that doctors do not accept friend or follow requests from current or previous patients and in general avoid interacting with them online.

Additionally, patient photos or patient-specific information should not be posted online under any circumstances. Doctors should also be mindful that others may look up to them for general medical advice and so if they do post any, it should be up to date and as accurate as possible.

However social media can also help the medical profession in general as a means to market services and promote good health practices and there are a number of techniques that can help create the best website for a medical centre. MIMS


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Art Jones's curator insight, July 24, 2:42 PM

Doctors, Social Media and Patient Trust

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How ‘Wellness’ Became an Epidemic

How ‘Wellness’ Became an Epidemic | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Why Wellness Is the New Way to Look, Feel, and Act Rich

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Art Jones's curator insight, June 28, 5:59 PM

Gwyneth Paltrow  launched GOOP in 2008, today it represents the leading edge of the groundswell that is the search for optimal wellness. Does Goop offer Real Value or Just More BS?

 

The following excerpt is shared by an MD who deals with patients coming to her office for care yet, predisposed to want this test and lets check for these others things too, please.

 

People on both sides of the conversation are fired up:

"Jennifer Gunter, an OB/GYN and pain-medicine physician in Toronto, writes a frank and often funny blog that often takes on Paltrow and Goop. One post reads: “Your goopshit bothers me because it affects my patients. They read your crackpot theories and they stop eating tomatoes (side note, if tomatoes are toxic why do Italians have a longer life expectancy than Americans?) or haven’t had a slice of bread for two years, they spend money on organic tampons they don’t need, they ask for unindicated testing for adrenal fatigue (and often pay a lot via co-payments or paying out of pocket), or they obsess that they have systemic Candida (they don’t)."

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Oscar Health Partners With Cleveland Clinic On Obamacare Exchange

Oscar Health Partners With Cleveland Clinic On Obamacare Exchange | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Oscar Health will partner with the Cleveland Clinic to offer individual coverage in Ohio on the public exchange under the Affordable Care Act.
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The Future of Medicine is Online and Social 

The Future of Medicine is Online and Social  | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

Having your regular, yearly exam over Facebook isn’t a future too far off. An interconnected world is becoming increasingly useful to both professionals and patients. Today, social media is more than just liking pictures of your grandma’s dogs; it is helping rural patients receive diagnoses, helping them take their medication correctly, and moving outdated medical centers into the 21st century. On the other hand, digitizing patient records also carries hidden dangers.

 

There’s a future in a socially driven medical world. Where innovation take us this year depends on how fast people want to move forward, and how fast people can be trained to reduce information loss.

Diagnosis

Telemedicine has been around for a long time, it’s broken through the confines of the telephone, moved onto Wi-Fi, and allowed doctors to talk with patients, answer their questions, and even recommend their next moves. There’s even a free app where you can just ask doctors questions. Moving telemedicine forward helps patients avoid needless hospital visits, gives doctors access to rural patients who are chronically underserved, and helps reduce cost, which is very important in American medical care. This would be especially effective if telemedicine moved away from phone calls and specific apps, and onto mainstream social media since people still use apps, but not many apps, and not with any frequency.

Taking Medication Incorrectly

Incorrectly taking medication is a big problem in America. 75 percent of Americans have trouble taking their medication as directed; that’s a huge amount of people who are not taking what they need to get better in a way that will make them better. Having an outlet on social media, or on an app where patients can confirm their medical information, will help them take prescriptions correctly, especially with reminders that pop up, or if it could alert the user to warn about medications that should not be mixed. This is especially helpful for people who don’t want to wait for a pharmacist to be free in order to get drug information.

Upgrades to Systems

Upgrades to online medical sites can help clients pay their bills, get an appointment, or help staff retrieve records faster. Using social media to make upgrades to a medical site could be life-saving; not only does social media allow you to directly relate to your followers, but it can help you specialize onsite to regional needs. This is huge in a global market, where some areas may not be able to run a larger website or might need a slightly different focus in order to clearly navigate.

 

You can even individualize web pages based on different accessibility needs. For example, that colorblindness page probably shouldn’t be full of red and green, and a page for the deaf could offer audio alternatives. Getting that feedback, in real time, from your users, is one of the benefits of upgrading a medical site from real-time social media feedback. If users have different needs, live with different internet speeds, or speak different languages, social media feedback is invaluable.

Information Security

With a growing communication network also comes the need for increased information security and digital backups.

 

Even with backups, about a third of users will lose some of their data through an error with backup methods, meaning that data recovery tools and software are very important — especially when in the medical field. If your primary records are kept online, be sure to have a backup on the cloud and a reliable data recovery tool/resource available if that information goes down; medical records are private, so your recovery resource should be prepared beforehand and discrete. Nothing could be worse than getting a client’s records, losing them, and accidentally giving them medication they are allergic to.  

 

Information security vulnerabilities are a huge liability in digital records, whether you’re talking to patients on social media or just digitizing records. There’s a ton of ways to make your online records safer, not just on social media, but in general. Encrypt files when you send them, verify identity before you send records, keep your servers safe, and ensure human errors stay at a minimum (most data attrition is from human error).

 

There are a few things you can do to reduce human error in your digital world. This is key in the medical industry where human error could cause someone to accidentally leak medical records, violate HIPAA regulations, and potentially lose their job — all because a hacker now knows that Mr. Johnson is allergic to mushrooms. There’s a variety of ways to train human error out of the system and discourage it from happening. For example, this could include standard practices like keeping private cell phones out of main server rooms, because cell phones are an easy security target. They could instead be tucked away in cell phone lockers. You can also train your employees to not download sketchy links in their email, use strong passwords, and let them know where and when they can use the internet for personal time. Nurses looking at Facebook on their lunch break? Not a big deal. Doctors answering questions while logged into the hospital account on a personal device? Kind of a big security risk.

 

Social media is great. It can help our medical community move forward by addressing more patient needs, help patients take their medications, and provide live feedback on how patients and doctors are reacting to the digitization. With digital upgrades comes more security risks. Social media can help patients and doctors alike, but it is essential to not let innovation endanger patient records.


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How patients are using social media

How patients are using social media | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
As patient communities grow stronger, understanding how patients are using social media plays an important role in education, leadership and patient support.

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What Was It My Doctor Said? The Funders Behind the Movement for Open Notes

What Was It My Doctor Said? The Funders Behind the Movement for Open Notes | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
If you want an example of how philanthropy, with relatively tiny resources,
can influence a sprawling $3 trillion healthcare system, look at the
growing push to empower patients to access key medical records. 

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Top 5 reasons why doctors lack self-confidence. And how to fix it.

Top 5 reasons why doctors lack self-confidence. And how to fix it. | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

In the podcast below I interview a dear friend and therapist, Sydney Ashland, who shares the top 10 fears that hold doctors back.

What prevents us from being the doctors we always imagined? We enter medicine as inspired, intelligent and compassionate humanitarians. Soon, we’re cynical and exhausted. How did all these totally amazing and high-functioning people get screwed up so fast? Attention, medical students and doctors: It’s not your fault. Here’s why you are suffering and what you can do about it.


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Self-taught artificial intelligence beats doctors at predicting heart attacks. #hcsmeufr

Self-taught artificial intelligence beats doctors at predicting heart attacks. #hcsmeufr | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
  • Doctors have lots of tools for predicting a patient’s health. But—as even they will tell you—they’re no match for the complexity of the human body. Heart attacks in particular are hard to anticipate. Now, scientists have shown that computers capable of teaching themselves can perform even better than standard medical guidelines, significantly increasing prediction rates. If implemented, the new method could save thousands or even millions of lives a year. 

“I can’t stress enough how important it is,” says Elsie Ross, a vascular surgeon at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who was not involved with the work, “and how much I really hope that doctors start to embrace the use of artificial intelligence to assist us in care of patients.”

 


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The top five myths of telehealth

The top five myths of telehealth | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Given telehealth is radically changing how healthcare leaders imagine care delivery, there are a lot of preconceived notions about what works, and what doesn’t.
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Half of hospitals to adopt artificial intelligence within 5 years

Half of hospitals to adopt artificial intelligence within 5 years | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
A new Healthcare IT News and HIMSS Analytics survey found population health and precision medicine among the initiatives where health IT professionals expect AI to have the greatest impact.

Via Art Jones
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Art Jones's curator insight, April 17, 12:48 PM

There was a time not too long ago when Healthcare was considered part of the late majority (diffusion of innovation curve).  Today healthcare has taken a leadership position, advancing cutting edge technologies to improve the quality of care.

 

Excerpt:

"About 35 percent of healthcare organizations plan to leverage artificial intelligence within two years — and more than half intend to do so within five."

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Digital treatments can be real medicine

Digital treatments can be real medicine | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

What if an app could replace a pill? That’s the big question behind an emerging trend known as “digital therapeutics.” The idea: software that can improve a person’s health as much as a drug can, but without the same cost and side-effects.


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NewYork-Presbyterian’s foray into pediatric telehealth

NewYork-Presbyterian’s foray into pediatric telehealth | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
NewYork-Presbyterian is expanding its telemedicine reach. It has launched Pediatric Urgent Care, a new telehealth offering that's part of NYP OnDemand.
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Where is precision medicine headed? - Medical Economics

Where is precision medicine headed? - Medical Economics | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

Physicians have practiced precision medicine, defined as the tailoring of medical treatment by taking into account individual differences in people’s genes, environments and lifestyles, for decades. The main difference today is that technological advances have given us greater power to combine comprehensive data collected over time about an individual tohelp provide appropriate care.

 

Further reading: Here's how physicians can impact healthcare policies

 

The precision medicine initiative, now known as the All of Us Research Program, launched by the National Institutes of Health, is an ambitious effort to gather data for over a million people living in the U.S. It will likely accelerate precision medicine research with the goal of eventually benefiting everyone by providing information that healthcare providers can use in the clinic. However, there are aspects of precision medicine that have emerged, or are beginning to emerge, in different clinics across the country and are being used to benefit patients today.

Pharmacogenomics (PGx), the study of genetic variations that cause individuals to respond differently to medications, is the most widely used form of precision medicine today. Virtually all of us harbor at least one genetic change that predisposes us to metabolize a common medication differently than the average person. A PGx panel with multiple genes can provide gene-drug guidelines for dozens of medications, including common ones like Warfarin, Clopidogrel or various antidepressants.

 

Trending on our site: Waiting on Congress to fix healthcare could be hazardous to physicians

 


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6 Digital Transformations In The Medical Industry

6 Digital Transformations In The Medical Industry | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Data has become a valuable tool and a foundation for healthcare to build its services and products. PSFK’s new Future of Health report identifies six

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Art Jones's curator insight, July 27, 11:12 AM

This article shows how digital and big data are ushering in the rapid evolution of health and wellness care.

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5 Modern Rules for Effective Hospital Marketing

5 Modern Rules for Effective Hospital Marketing | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Modern times demand modern rules. And healthcare marketing is no exception. The market is constantly evolving, leading to a seismic shift in healthcare marketing trends. Here are a few
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Confessions of a Dr. Google addict

Confessions of a Dr. Google addict | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

I found a lump in my neck when I was 20. It was soft and the size of a small grape. To make matters worse, it was the middle of my exam period.

Anxious and out of energy, I do the only thing I could think of to help calm myself down. I open up Google, find a medical diagnosis website and ask it just what the hell is wrong with me. Just 0.25 seconds later, I had my answer, and I feel the sharp pain of a lump in the centre of my chest. I probably had thyroid cancer. Or lymphoma. Or possibly HIV.

And just like that, I had become a patient of ‘Dr. Google.’

The internet has transformed industry. You can order your groceries, download movies and trade stocks online. Previously these industries required separate commitments. You had to go to the grocery store, head to the movie store or have a stockbroker. Most of these changes have been positive. They help us multitask and complete chores quicker. But the instant nature of Google raises an important question: should all conveniences shift towards the computer screen?

 


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24 Outstanding Statistics & Figures on How Social Media has Impacted the Health Care Industry

24 Outstanding Statistics & Figures on How Social Media has Impacted the Health Care Industry | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Communication has been disrupted through social media but how has the health care industry faired? Dive into an analysis of 24 statistics on the subject.

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How Cleveland Clinic connects with patients via social media

How Cleveland Clinic connects with patients via social media | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
The Cleveland Clinic also has a substantial base on social media and has been on Facebook since 2008 and now has about two million Facebook followers.

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Tailoring HCP engagement strategies to improve clinical outcomes

Tailoring HCP engagement strategies to improve clinical outcomes | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Tailored HCP engagement may improve clinical outcomes by aligning with individual’s learning needs or preferences, providing directly related information.

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Five Reasons Why Physicians Need to Use Social Media 

Physician participation in social media is a health care imperative according to Dr. Kevin Pho, a practicing internist and the founder of KevinMD.com, a leading online health portal; however, many physicians remain skeptical about the value of social media.  At an Ethics Forum hosted by the Massachusetts Medical Society on December 2, 2011, Pho suggested several reasons why physicians need to embrace new ways to communicate with their patients.

A social media epiphany

Pho began blogging in May, 2004 as a way to share links to health care resources and talk about health care reform.  In the fall of 2004, when the Merck drug Vioxx was recalled, Pho’s office was flooded with patient phone calls.  In response, Pho decided to write a blog post about the recall.  When one of his patients mentioned that the blog post had reassured and comforted him, Pho recognized the tremendous potential of social media.    He realized that patients want health information but are overwhelmed, frustrated, confused and even frightened by what they find online.  Health care professionals, Pho noted, can play an important role by becoming a reputable source of online information or by directing patients to reliable sources.  

Making the case for social media participation

Pho offered five reasons doctors should participate in social media:

  1. Provide context.  Pho pointed out that every day new health stories are published.  Social media is a powerful way for physicians to provide context and meaning to the news items that patients read and view.
  2. Dispel myths.  Online health information can be medically and factually inaccurate.  To maintain physicians’ standing as health care authorities, Pho emphasized that it is critical for doctors to use social media to counter myths perpetuated by inaccurate health information.
  3. Influence the health care debate.  Pho cited the results of a Gallup survey which concluded that patients trust physicians regarding health care policy. Participation in social media gives physicians a way to express their views and influence the formulation of policies that will shape how medicine is practiced.
  4. Choose social networks carefully. There are many different social media networks today. Facebook has been the most popular for a long time, but others are gaining traction too, such as Instagram. It’s a good idea to buy Instagram likes and invest in other social networks, since they are changing the marketing landscape for the healthcare profession.
  5. Connect with mainstream media.  Experience with social media can provide physicians with the skills they need to connect with mainstream media.  For example, Pho noted that writing his blog gave him the confidence to write op-eds for mainstream news publications. 
  6. Hear what patients have to say.  Social media gives patients a place to express their frustrations and concerns about health care.  By listening to patient feedback on his blog, Pho has changed the way he practices medicine.  He now offers same day appointments, doesn’t take his laptop into the exam room and makes sure patients receive their test results.

Rules of engagement

Prior to using social media, Pho suggested that physicians consult guidelines, such as those prepared by the American Medical Association or the Massachusetts Medical Society.    He emphasized that patient privacy always comes first.  He also offered these pointers:

  1. Tiptoe into social media.  Start small by establishing a presence in a single social media community.   Expand your presence as you get more comfortable.
  2. Stay professional.  Pho advised that rules for online and offline professional behavior are identical:  behavior on the web is no different from behavior in the exam room.
  3. Think twice before you hit enter.  Pho reminded attendees that what you post on the web is permanently indexed by search engines so post thoughtfully not impulsively. 
  4. Manage your online reputation.  According to Pho you can’t get delete a negative online review but you can downplay its significance by creating a healthy online presence.  He noted that any page you put in your own name such as websites, blogs or social profiles on Linkedin, Twitter or Facebook, will rank more highly in search results than reviews on third party rating sites.  Additionally, he suggested being proactive by asking patients to submit reviews. He noted that most reviews are positive.  He also encourages doctors to Google their name at least once a week to continually monitor and protect their reputations.

 Pho closed by noting that the true value of social media for physicians may be its ability to strengthen and preserve relationships with patients. 


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How to Create Healthcare Apps That People Love

How to Create Healthcare Apps That People Love | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

It’s more complicated to create an engaging app than many business managers expect, especially in healthcare, one of the most complex industries. There are often different, opposing forces at work that make the task more challenging.

Your odds of an excellent outcome increase significantly if you keep one word in mind: prioritization.

In other words, deeply understanding a user’s priorities based on a changing context makes all the difference. What’s important enough to motivate a user to launch your app and to do so regularly? Does your approach make the user’s life easier, or does your interface baffle and confuse them?


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The Real Ways that Most Patients Find Their Physicians 

The Real Ways that Most Patients Find Their Physicians  | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

Social media is a significant force in medical marketing, but it’s not always the tipping point that causes a patient to set an appointment. Social media maintains its niche for potential clients who want to research a practice and learn more about a potential physician’s specialties and patient base.

Click here for a free video checkup of your medical practice!

Therefore, the bulk of the marketing that draws patients in is carried by other methods. Some of them are more traditional. When combined, they cover many of the crucial bases in marketing.

  • Internet Search

23.8% of booked appointments in 2016 were initiated through the internet, according to a medical marketing research study published by Opticall.com. Your website can draw them in, especially if it ranks high in search engine optimization.

  • Radio

Even in this age of Spotify, radio advertisements are still a significant marketing tool. At 8.42%, radio ranks as one of the top three means of medical marketing last year. Talk radio still delivers a whopping impact on listeners. Whether you are acting as a guest speaker or paying for an ad, it is important to deliver an original message that will stand apart from the rest of the noise. Being unique and memorable is the best way to be noticed.

  • TV

Perhaps surprisingly, TV ads boasted the highest rise in the percentage of medical referral conversions. The overall ranking was 4.67%, which was up 2.5% from its 2015 average. As with radio, individuality is key. Deliver a creative message and make it stick. Video marketing is a powerful tool and could be used to its best advantage with this medium. There are endless opportunities for self-promotion through a creative TV ad.

  • Billboard

We’ve all driven by those billboards, but the power is in the repetition. When a man sees a sign that says, “Best Treatment for Migraine Headaches” every day during his commute, and then one day he has a migraine, what’s he going to do? Signage and billboards rated 2.43% on the conversion scale.

  • Referral

There is no better source for a booked appointment than a positive referral. Word of mouth still tops the charts at a whopping 55.58% and rising. Reviews work because they are the best source of credibility. A patient who has a positive experience in your office has the potential to become a walking advertisement.

With this in mind, a good rule of thumb is to stay true to core values when treating patients. Genuineness shines through. The most ethical physicians become invested in the patient’s experience. The best way to stand apart from other doctors, from a medical perspective as well as a social one, is to truly care about the patient. It is crucial to connect with the patient on a human level.


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Doctors of the Digital Age: How Medical Students Navigate Technology-like all of us, over reliance on online info

Doctors of the Digital Age: How Medical Students Navigate Technology-like all of us, over reliance on online info | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

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