Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing
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The Marketing Value of YouTube

The Marketing Value of YouTube | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
5 reasons you should be using YouTube to market and promote your business.

Via Mike Allton
eMedToday's insight:

Hospital should do one minute video called medical minutue by doctors or patients.

 

Mayo Clinic has over 300 k videos.

 

What is your video strategy

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Mike Allton's curator insight, August 2, 2013 12:05 PM

Are you using YouTube?

If you aren't yet using YouTube to promote your business, guest author +Kate Funk has some points to make to get you to reconsider.

For instance, many people today are far too busy to take 20 - 30 minutes to read an article. They will, however, take 5 minutes to watch your video. Creating that kind of content can really help you reach a segment of your target audience that you're otherwise missing.

And now, thanks to Google+ Hangouts, you can be creating fantastic video through conversations, discussions and panels, with a little help from your friends and influencers!

If you aren't yet using video and YouTube to promote your business, what's stopping you?

Thanks for reading, and have a great weekend!

#SocialMedia   #YouTube   #Marketing  

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Singapore spends three times less the USA on healthcare and gets better results

Singapore spends three times less the USA on healthcare and gets better results | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Singapores healthcare system has excellent health outcomes while spending, as of 2014, is just 5 percent of G.D.P. on health care. B
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Social Media and Medicine 

Social Media and Medicine  | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

In the field of medicine, social media can be a blessing and a curse. On one hand, it broadens your influence, helps you connect with patients, and allows you to gauge public morale. On the other hand, it opens the door to faulty medical advice, puts your reputation at risk, and leads to generalities.

So is there a way for physicians to make peace with this unavoidable digital age? Here are some ways you can use your social media powers for good:

Using social media to educate

The most powerful way physicians can use social media is by imparting sound medical advice. They now have a greater opportunity than ever to use their skills to impact society at large. This is especially important since there is so much conflicting medical information and health advice on the internet, which spreads like wildfire via social media. And unlike other professions, more is at stake here, since incorrect medical advice can be life-threatening.

Thus, rather than dismissing social media, it is even more crucial that physicians take an active role in correcting wrong information by providing sound medical advice. As one medical professional affirms: “Every bit of knowledge that we convey adds up over time. Sometimes it can be frustrating to battle the constant barrage of false information and half-truths out there, but it is our duty to impart facts and information to others. In a nonthreatening way, we need to confront and discredit false information posted by others. Passing on knowledge is one of the key components to making a better society for ourselves and our fellow citizens.”

Using social media to connect with patients   

The most obvious way social media is used both in and outside the medical field is to stay connected. Patients desire more regular and immediate access to their healthcare, and social media helps break down those barriers. More familiarity and accessibility builds trust over time. Furthermore, social media empowers patients to take a more active role in their health and selecting a health care provider. Thus, physicians should not feel threatened by this, but rather see it as an opportunity to work as a team with their patients.

This greater transparency can also incentivize physicians to provide quality care, rewarded by positive reviews on physician rating sites: “Social media platforms such as Facebook provide an opportunity to showcase the quality of care provided whether it’s through patient reviews or even just engaged followers. Physicians need to take this opportunity to showcase their expertise, compassion and overall quality of care to potential patients.”

Using social media to gauge morale

Beyond the more practical and functional aspects of social media, it allows us to detect patterns in the morale and attitudes among medical students, physicians, and patients. First, people are usually more candid via social media than they would be in person, and second, you are able to see where the collective stands on various issues rather than focusing on single opinions.

Anonymous social media organizations geared towards medical professionals give doctors and medical students a platform to express their true feelings and concerns, which are often considered taboo on the job. For example, one physician shares her concern over the underlying anger and ignorance permeating the medical profession. Social media also gives medical students a safe place to express their frustration, and allows educators to detect early signs of burnout and depression. Awareness goes a long way in addressing issues before it’s too late.    


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Art Jones's curator insight, March 6, 6:45 PM

Social media can be a domain fraught with danger for anyone and the stakes go up exponentially for those in the medical profession.

 

Those in the medical profession have an obligation to join the conversations taking place online to assure those seeking answers to their medical questions receive sound advice. 

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Millions rely on retail health clinics

Millions rely on retail health clinics | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
A new survey shows many go to retail clinics to receive basic preventative care.
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NHS to offer free devices and apps to help people manage illnesses

NHS to offer free devices and apps to help people manage illnesses | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

Health service seeks to use of technology to help patients manage conditions such as diabetes and heart disease.

New heart monitors will be able to detect irregular rhythms that are a key cause of sudden cardiac death, which kills 100,000 people in the UK every year. 

 

 

Millions of people will receive devices and apps free on the NHS to help them manage conditions such as diabetes and heart disease in an major drive to use technology to reduce patient deaths.

NHS England’s chief executive, Simon Stevens, has backed the move as a significant expansion of self-care that could help prevent patients becoming seriously unwell and needing hospital treatment.

He wants people who already use apps such as Uber or Airbnb to show the same willingness to embrace digital technology that could alert them to the possible onset of a stroke, heart attackor deadly infection. The NHS will start making them available to patients in England from next year. If widely adopted, they could save tens of thousands of lives a year, Stevens said.

 


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#Patients can lower medical costs by getting involved

#Patients can lower medical costs by getting involved | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
KEY TAKEAWAY: Via the WSJ: Patients who were encouraged by health coaches to review options and get more involved in choices had 5.3% lower overall medical costs, 12.5% fewer hospital admissions an…

Via Pharmacomptoir / Corinne Thuderoz, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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How Americans Recall and Act Upon Digital. Social top news source and health drives follow-up actions

How Americans Recall and Act Upon Digital. Social top news source and health drives follow-up actions | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

A new report by the PEW Research Center titled "How Americans Encounter, Recall and Act Upon Digital News" dives deep into how Americans get their news and what actions they take after learning about different topics. The topics that spark further actions show health near the top. 


Via Olivier Delannoy, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Healthcare guide to Social Media Marketing

The Healthcare Industry Can No Longer Ignore Social Media As the healthcare industry continues to constantly change, it is extremely important that healthcare …

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor, Anna Koczorowska
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Can Social Media Save Lives? | Life Goals Mag

Can Social Media Save Lives? | Life Goals Mag | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Many people think of social media as a place to waste time. Users log on to check out a friend’s vacation photos, let the world know about their relationship status and catch up on some news. And hopefully not the fake kind. But can social media be used for a greater good?

Could it save lives? The short answer is “yes.”

From providing emotional support to suffering patients to training of first responders to education and encouraging wellness, social media provides health benefits galore. So while Facebook can’t drive you to the hospital yet, there are many signs of hope within social media channels.


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Being patient-centric in a digitizing world | McKinsey & Company

Being patient-centric in a digitizing world | McKinsey & Company | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
A Danish pharma company’s strong customer focus and determined digital drive have important lessons for other businesses.

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Deloitte - 2017 Global health care sector outlook

Deloitte - 2017 Global health care sector outlook | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Rising demand and associated spending are being fueled by an aging population; the growing prevalence of chronic diseases and comorbidities; development of costly clinical innovations; increasing patient awareness, knowledge, and expectations; and continued economic uncertainty despite regional pockets of recovery are just a few of the key issues and trends impacting the global health care sector. Read on to learn more about trends impacting the global health care sector in 2017 and suggested considerations for stakeholders.

Via Olivier Delannoy
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What doctors think about Obamacare

What doctors think about Obamacare | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
As a repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act dominates politics, doctors are being left to figure out what's best for their patients.
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Use of digital to engage patients and providers

Overview of the use digital technologies and social media by hospitals - Dec. 7, 2016

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More Than Two-thirds of Patient Advocacy Groups Receive Industry Funding

More Than Two-thirds of Patient Advocacy Groups Receive Industry Funding | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

At a time when drug company lobbyists are widely vilified as icons of avarice, patient advocacy groups still wear the white hats.

 

But those organizations, which promote cures for every type of cancer and hundreds more diseases, have come under criticism lately for favoring their drug company funders in contests on Capitol Hill.

 

In one case, a diabetes group accepted money from food companies and played down the health risks from their high-sugar products; in another case, a mental health association, reliant on drug company dollars, opted to keep quiet about the soaring prices of its antidepressants. And many of the patient advocacy groups pushing for passage of the 21st Century Cures Act, which consumer groups argue rolls back patient protection, are funded in large part by pharmaceutical firms.

 

“The public should be concerned about this for many reasons,” said Jonathan H. Marks, director of the bioethics program at Pennsylvania State University. “One of the most important is that patient advocacy groups have credibility with policymakers — as corporate donors are well aware. Policymakers tend to assume that these organizations are acting in the interests of patients, or public health more broadly.”

 

But, said Marks, this is not always the case when the groups are reliant on drug or device industry donations — a point not often discussed when they lobby the Food and Drug Administration to speed new drugs to market, participate in National Institutes of Health panels, bring patients to testify before Congress, or advise patients on courses of treatment.

 

A study published Tuesday in JAMA Internal Medicine offers evidence of the ways in which patient advocacy organizations, or PAOs, rely on industry dollars.

 

The research, led by Susannah Rose of the Cleveland Clinic, shows that PAOs receive industry funding more often than previously believed. Some of the groups’ leaders, responding to a confidential survey, also acknowledged donor pressure to take policy positions that are best for the donors. Others said they doubted their own level of independence.

 

Rose, director of research in the Cleveland Clinic Office of Patient Experience, and her colleagues surveyed 439 patient advocacy organizations across the United States.

 

Of the 289 groups that responded, more than two-thirds reported receiving industry funding, with a median of $299,000. Twelve percent said they received over half their funding from industry. Almost 9 percent received $1 million or more. The pharmaceutical, medical device, and biotechnology sector accounted for a median of 45 percent of the donations. Only one quarter of the groups said they had policies on disclosing their financial relationships.

 

Further Reading:

  • Transparency is Good in Theory, But Not in Practice; http://sco.lt/6qCqTR
  • #Pharma to Patient Advocacy Groups Questioning High Drug Prices: "Why Are You Doing This to Us?"; http://sco.lt/4sOB7J
  • Holy Sh*t! Is There No End to Mylan's Shenanigans? Paying Off Patient Groups to Lobby!; http://sco.lt/6Sl0ld
  • UK Patient Groups that Backed New Cancer Drug Received £ from #Pharma Firm; http://sco.lt/84W3En
  • Majority of Patients’ Groups Siding With Pharma Against Medicare Part B Pricing Reforms Receive Industry Funding; http://sco.lt/574i6D
  • #Pharma's "Patient Centricity" Pays Off: Patient Groups Mum on Drug Costs; http://sco.lt/8ydeuv

Via Pharma Guy, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Will telemedicine take your job?

Will telemedicine take your job? | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
How many lives are worth protecting with the added expense of a physician in person?

 

Telemedicine is often in the news and until recently I had only casually glossed over the latest articles. The details I paid little attention to, but the headlines I would remember. “Great for rural areas” I would read! “Extend physician reach!” “Get specialists to greater numbers of patients with unique conditions!”

As a nearly graduated anesthesia resident in a large city with an abundance of doctors, I didn’t think telemedicine would have much impact on my future. None of the above headlines applied. However, I would be surprised one morning to wake up to an email that roughly said: “Thank you for your service to our patients in the past, but we will now be covering your position with telemedicine doctors, effective (nearly) immediately.”


Via Giuseppe Fattori
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A Good Thing Happens When Doctors Start Talking to Their Patients

A Good Thing Happens When Doctors Start Talking to Their Patients | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
A longer visit with your doctor before a procedure can improve results and save money, according to Robert S. Kaplan.

Via Art Jones
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Art Jones's curator insight, March 6, 6:32 PM

More face 2 face time between physicians and patients early and often lead to better outcomes.

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Cost of convenience: Impact of retail clinics on the health care market

Cost of convenience: Impact of retail clinics on the health care market | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Infectious Diseases in Children | In pharmacies, supermarkets and ‘big box’ stores across the country, retail health clinics have experienced exponential growth, stemming largely from patients’ involvement in their own care — and the financial burden that comes with it.No longer the ‘novelty’ health care alternative they were considered when the first retail-based clinic opened in Minnesota in
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4 Trends Shaping The Future Of Medical Events

4 Trends Shaping The Future Of Medical Events | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Read on to learn the 4 key ways to catapult medical events full of boring talks and without considering patients' or doctors' needs into the 21st century.
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Social media research in the health domain (tutorial)

Tutorial about the use of social media in the health domain. The tutorial is designed for healthcare professionals interested in eHealth. It was done for Weill…

Via Plus91, Giuseppe Fattori
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NHS to start prescribing health apps that help manage conditions

NHS to start prescribing health apps that help manage conditions | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
The future of healthcare could be in your pocket. Two new medical apps that help people monitor their health at home, reducing their need to visit a doctor, are set to be rolled out to as many as four UK National Health Service trusts over the next year.The apps, which are currently being trialled in four hospitals in Oxfordshire, UK, transmit patient data from a tablet or smartphone directly to clinicians. According to Ilan Lieberman, a member of the Royal Society of Medicine’s council on telemedicine and ehealth, such apps will have a huge impact on the management of chronic diseases.One system, called GDm-health, helps manage the treatment of gestational diabetes – a condition that affects about 1 in 10 pregnant women. The smartphone app lets women send each blood glucose reading they take at home to their diabetes clinician.
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Simple Digital Technologies Can Reduce Health Care Costs

Businesses that are serious about reducing health care costs — and improving the health and well-being of their employees — should take a serious look at digital therapeutics, which have the potential to provide effective, low-cost ways to prevent and treat chronic diseases and their consequences. Digital therapeutics are technology-based solutions that have a clinical impact on disease comparable to that of a drug. They primarily use consumer-grade technology such as mobile devices, wearable sensors, big data analytics, and behavioral science and can be delivered through web browsers, apps, or in conjunction with medical devices. They can also be deployed in real time and at scale, which is critical for intervention in chronic diseases.

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Social media and patients associations: get social!

Crash course given for Lupus Europe in the Convention held in Helsinki in September 2014 to explain why it is so important that patient associations are into s…

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How Doctors can Compete with Retail Clinics in 2017

How Doctors can Compete with Retail Clinics in 2017 | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
In today's healthcare space, many doctors are competing with retail clinics for patients. Here are 5 ways physicians can compete with retail clinics.
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Has online health information changed the physician-patient relationship?

Has online health information changed the physician-patient relationship? | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

 As patients have better access to health information through the Internet and expect to be more engaged in health decision making, traditional models of the patient-provider relationship and communication strategies must be revisited to adapt to this changing demographic.

 

Physicians often don’t have the time to explain the complex world of medicine to patients. While more people are going online for health information the Internet can be like a jungle with many false trails to supposed health information.  For the most part, it’s up to online health seekers to determine what is “real” and ‘trusted” as opposed to false and fake.  Within lies a great opportunity for pharma companies.


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Alejandro Buldón's curator insight, January 26, 4:21 AM
Journal of Internet Medical Research: "A medida que los pacientes tienen un mejor acceso a la información de salud a través de Internet y esperan estar más involucrados en la toma de decisiones de salud, modelos tradicionales de la relación entre el paciente y el proveedor y las estrategias de comunicación deben ser revisados para adaptarse a esta evolución demográfica".
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Oscar | Smart, simple health insurance.

Oscar | Smart, simple health insurance. | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Hi, we're Oscar, a better kind of health insurance company.We're using technology to make insurance simple, intuitive, and human. Get a free quote at hioscar.com.

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Art Jones's curator insight, January 14, 2:11 PM

Will this new health insurance paradigm succeed where others are failing by leveraging digital health technologies?#Telemedicine #TheFutureofHealthcare

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New Prescription: Doctor Offices That Look Like Apple Stores

New Prescription: Doctor Offices That Look Like Apple Stores | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
After a relative suffered a heart attack a few years ago, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Adrian Aoun got an unsettling look at a health-care system that he diagnosed as an inefficient and outdated mess.

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Art Jones's curator insight, January 17, 10:53 AM

Creativity and Innovation are coming to every facet of the healthcare and wellness industry. Adrian Aoun has a most interesting vision for the future of your visit to the doctor's office, read an excerpt for the article here:

 

"It's called Forward, a health-management service that charges a $149 per month — roughly $1,800 a year — to tend to all of its patients' primary-care needs. And not just with attentive doctoring, either; Forward plans to deploy body scanners, sensors, giant touch-screen monitors, infrared devices and other high-tech gizmos that could make a doctor's appointment feel more like a trip to an Apple store."