Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing
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Content Marketing Is The New Advertising

Content Marketing Is The New Advertising | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

"Understanding what content marketing is and where it's headed next"


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eMedToday's insight:

content marketing is key part of every hospital strategy or at less should be.

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Laurent Ollivier's curator insight, July 9, 2013 1:47 AM

En regroupant toute ses expertises dédiées aux contenus (rédaction, vidéo, social, curation…) dans sa Content Factory, Aressy répond au besoin des marques de créer un contenu "intéressant" avant d'être "intéressé". Aujourd'hui il faut donner pour recevoir et le contenu est un levier efficace de cette stratégie

CAEXI BEST's curator insight, July 16, 2013 7:49 PM
Content Marketing est la nouvelle publicité
warehouseIt's comment, August 14, 2013 9:53 AM
The art is sourcing good intelligent content that will attract current and prospective customers
Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing
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Confessions of a Dr. Google addict

Confessions of a Dr. Google addict | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

I found a lump in my neck when I was 20. It was soft and the size of a small grape. To make matters worse, it was the middle of my exam period.

Anxious and out of energy, I do the only thing I could think of to help calm myself down. I open up Google, find a medical diagnosis website and ask it just what the hell is wrong with me. Just 0.25 seconds later, I had my answer, and I feel the sharp pain of a lump in the centre of my chest. I probably had thyroid cancer. Or lymphoma. Or possibly HIV.

And just like that, I had become a patient of ‘Dr. Google.’

The internet has transformed industry. You can order your groceries, download movies and trade stocks online. Previously these industries required separate commitments. You had to go to the grocery store, head to the movie store or have a stockbroker. Most of these changes have been positive. They help us multitask and complete chores quicker. But the instant nature of Google raises an important question: should all conveniences shift towards the computer screen?

 


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24 Outstanding Statistics & Figures on How Social Media has Impacted the Health Care Industry

24 Outstanding Statistics & Figures on How Social Media has Impacted the Health Care Industry | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Communication has been disrupted through social media but how has the health care industry faired? Dive into an analysis of 24 statistics on the subject.

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How Cleveland Clinic connects with patients via social media

How Cleveland Clinic connects with patients via social media | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
The Cleveland Clinic also has a substantial base on social media and has been on Facebook since 2008 and now has about two million Facebook followers.

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Tailoring HCP engagement strategies to improve clinical outcomes

Tailoring HCP engagement strategies to improve clinical outcomes | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Tailored HCP engagement may improve clinical outcomes by aligning with individual’s learning needs or preferences, providing directly related information.

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Five Reasons Why Physicians Need to Use Social Media 

Physician participation in social media is a health care imperative according to Dr. Kevin Pho, a practicing internist and the founder of KevinMD.com, a leading online health portal; however, many physicians remain skeptical about the value of social media.  At an Ethics Forum hosted by the Massachusetts Medical Society on December 2, 2011, Pho suggested several reasons why physicians need to embrace new ways to communicate with their patients.

A social media epiphany

Pho began blogging in May, 2004 as a way to share links to health care resources and talk about health care reform.  In the fall of 2004, when the Merck drug Vioxx was recalled, Pho’s office was flooded with patient phone calls.  In response, Pho decided to write a blog post about the recall.  When one of his patients mentioned that the blog post had reassured and comforted him, Pho recognized the tremendous potential of social media.    He realized that patients want health information but are overwhelmed, frustrated, confused and even frightened by what they find online.  Health care professionals, Pho noted, can play an important role by becoming a reputable source of online information or by directing patients to reliable sources.  

Making the case for social media participation

Pho offered five reasons doctors should participate in social media:

  1. Provide context.  Pho pointed out that every day new health stories are published.  Social media is a powerful way for physicians to provide context and meaning to the news items that patients read and view.
  2. Dispel myths.  Online health information can be medically and factually inaccurate.  To maintain physicians’ standing as health care authorities, Pho emphasized that it is critical for doctors to use social media to counter myths perpetuated by inaccurate health information.
  3. Influence the health care debate.  Pho cited the results of a Gallup survey which concluded that patients trust physicians regarding health care policy. Participation in social media gives physicians a way to express their views and influence the formulation of policies that will shape how medicine is practiced.
  4. Choose social networks carefully. There are many different social media networks today. Facebook has been the most popular for a long time, but others are gaining traction too, such as Instagram. It’s a good idea to buy Instagram likes and invest in other social networks, since they are changing the marketing landscape for the healthcare profession.
  5. Connect with mainstream media.  Experience with social media can provide physicians with the skills they need to connect with mainstream media.  For example, Pho noted that writing his blog gave him the confidence to write op-eds for mainstream news publications. 
  6. Hear what patients have to say.  Social media gives patients a place to express their frustrations and concerns about health care.  By listening to patient feedback on his blog, Pho has changed the way he practices medicine.  He now offers same day appointments, doesn’t take his laptop into the exam room and makes sure patients receive their test results.

Rules of engagement

Prior to using social media, Pho suggested that physicians consult guidelines, such as those prepared by the American Medical Association or the Massachusetts Medical Society.    He emphasized that patient privacy always comes first.  He also offered these pointers:

  1. Tiptoe into social media.  Start small by establishing a presence in a single social media community.   Expand your presence as you get more comfortable.
  2. Stay professional.  Pho advised that rules for online and offline professional behavior are identical:  behavior on the web is no different from behavior in the exam room.
  3. Think twice before you hit enter.  Pho reminded attendees that what you post on the web is permanently indexed by search engines so post thoughtfully not impulsively. 
  4. Manage your online reputation.  According to Pho you can’t get delete a negative online review but you can downplay its significance by creating a healthy online presence.  He noted that any page you put in your own name such as websites, blogs or social profiles on Linkedin, Twitter or Facebook, will rank more highly in search results than reviews on third party rating sites.  Additionally, he suggested being proactive by asking patients to submit reviews. He noted that most reviews are positive.  He also encourages doctors to Google their name at least once a week to continually monitor and protect their reputations.

 Pho closed by noting that the true value of social media for physicians may be its ability to strengthen and preserve relationships with patients. 


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Astra Hospital's curator insight, May 4, 2:55 AM
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How to Create Healthcare Apps That People Love

How to Create Healthcare Apps That People Love | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

It’s more complicated to create an engaging app than many business managers expect, especially in healthcare, one of the most complex industries. There are often different, opposing forces at work that make the task more challenging.

Your odds of an excellent outcome increase significantly if you keep one word in mind: prioritization.

In other words, deeply understanding a user’s priorities based on a changing context makes all the difference. What’s important enough to motivate a user to launch your app and to do so regularly? Does your approach make the user’s life easier, or does your interface baffle and confuse them?


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The Real Ways that Most Patients Find Their Physicians 

The Real Ways that Most Patients Find Their Physicians  | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

Social media is a significant force in medical marketing, but it’s not always the tipping point that causes a patient to set an appointment. Social media maintains its niche for potential clients who want to research a practice and learn more about a potential physician’s specialties and patient base.

Click here for a free video checkup of your medical practice!

Therefore, the bulk of the marketing that draws patients in is carried by other methods. Some of them are more traditional. When combined, they cover many of the crucial bases in marketing.

  • Internet Search

23.8% of booked appointments in 2016 were initiated through the internet, according to a medical marketing research study published by Opticall.com. Your website can draw them in, especially if it ranks high in search engine optimization.

  • Radio

Even in this age of Spotify, radio advertisements are still a significant marketing tool. At 8.42%, radio ranks as one of the top three means of medical marketing last year. Talk radio still delivers a whopping impact on listeners. Whether you are acting as a guest speaker or paying for an ad, it is important to deliver an original message that will stand apart from the rest of the noise. Being unique and memorable is the best way to be noticed.

  • TV

Perhaps surprisingly, TV ads boasted the highest rise in the percentage of medical referral conversions. The overall ranking was 4.67%, which was up 2.5% from its 2015 average. As with radio, individuality is key. Deliver a creative message and make it stick. Video marketing is a powerful tool and could be used to its best advantage with this medium. There are endless opportunities for self-promotion through a creative TV ad.

  • Billboard

We’ve all driven by those billboards, but the power is in the repetition. When a man sees a sign that says, “Best Treatment for Migraine Headaches” every day during his commute, and then one day he has a migraine, what’s he going to do? Signage and billboards rated 2.43% on the conversion scale.

  • Referral

There is no better source for a booked appointment than a positive referral. Word of mouth still tops the charts at a whopping 55.58% and rising. Reviews work because they are the best source of credibility. A patient who has a positive experience in your office has the potential to become a walking advertisement.

With this in mind, a good rule of thumb is to stay true to core values when treating patients. Genuineness shines through. The most ethical physicians become invested in the patient’s experience. The best way to stand apart from other doctors, from a medical perspective as well as a social one, is to truly care about the patient. It is crucial to connect with the patient on a human level.


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Doctors of the Digital Age: How Medical Students Navigate Technology-like all of us, over reliance on online info

Doctors of the Digital Age: How Medical Students Navigate Technology-like all of us, over reliance on online info | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

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Pact Is First Health App To Become An Insurance Plan

Pact Is First Health App To Become An Insurance Plan | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

There are dozens of apps that let you track your activity to try and change unhealthy behavior. Soon, more will share your data with employers to help them track and change your behavior too, all in a bid to cut rising health insurance costs.

 

On Tuesday the health tracking app Pact became the first, freely available smartphone application to launch its own health plan for employers, called Pact Health. It’s an insurance service in all but name since Pact can offer extra coverage the more you exercise, but the 15-person startup is calling it a health "plan" to avoid the extra regulatory scrutiny.

 


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Art Jones's curator insight, April 7, 7:01 PM

A Health App that sells you insurance based upon the activity recorded by the App, ex. how often and at what intensity you exercise.

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IBM's Watson AI Recommends Same Treatment as Doctors in 99% of Cancer Cases

IBM's Watson AI Recommends Same Treatment as Doctors in 99% of Cancer Cases | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Watson recommended treatment plans that matched suggestions from oncologists in 99 percent of the cases it analyzed and offered options doctors missed in 30 percent of them. AI could be revolutionary for healthcare as it can process many more research papers and case files than any human doctor could manage.

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Healthcare urgently needs a Copernican Revolution

Healthcare urgently needs a Copernican Revolution | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
We live in a pre-Copernican model where all of the planets float around the healthcare system, including the patient. What we need is the patient at the center. We need to put the sun where it belongs.

Via Art Jones
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Art Jones's curator insight, April 6, 11:29 AM

The Institute of Medicine defines patient-centered care as: “Providing care that is respectful of, and responsive to, individual patient preferences, needs and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.”  Considering this definition and the current experience of most patients, it is clear we have a long way to go.

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Social Media for Medical Technology Companies

Companies can leverage social media to drive business and compete effectively in the new era of health care. But what do you need to know before jumping in or …

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Managing Cybersecurity & Risk in Rural Hospitals

Managing Cybersecurity & Risk in Rural Hospitals | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Despite all its benefits, digital health care has also introduced new threats and vulnerabilities. Hospitals can prepare for and manage such risks by integrating cybersecurity preparedness into their existing governance, risk management and business continuity framework. Health Forum convened a panel of small and rural hospital executives in Phoenix to explore what rural organizations are doing to improve cybersecurity preparedness.
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The Future of Medicine is Online and Social 

The Future of Medicine is Online and Social  | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

Having your regular, yearly exam over Facebook isn’t a future too far off. An interconnected world is becoming increasingly useful to both professionals and patients. Today, social media is more than just liking pictures of your grandma’s dogs; it is helping rural patients receive diagnoses, helping them take their medication correctly, and moving outdated medical centers into the 21st century. On the other hand, digitizing patient records also carries hidden dangers.

 

There’s a future in a socially driven medical world. Where innovation take us this year depends on how fast people want to move forward, and how fast people can be trained to reduce information loss.

Diagnosis

Telemedicine has been around for a long time, it’s broken through the confines of the telephone, moved onto Wi-Fi, and allowed doctors to talk with patients, answer their questions, and even recommend their next moves. There’s even a free app where you can just ask doctors questions. Moving telemedicine forward helps patients avoid needless hospital visits, gives doctors access to rural patients who are chronically underserved, and helps reduce cost, which is very important in American medical care. This would be especially effective if telemedicine moved away from phone calls and specific apps, and onto mainstream social media since people still use apps, but not many apps, and not with any frequency.

Taking Medication Incorrectly

Incorrectly taking medication is a big problem in America. 75 percent of Americans have trouble taking their medication as directed; that’s a huge amount of people who are not taking what they need to get better in a way that will make them better. Having an outlet on social media, or on an app where patients can confirm their medical information, will help them take prescriptions correctly, especially with reminders that pop up, or if it could alert the user to warn about medications that should not be mixed. This is especially helpful for people who don’t want to wait for a pharmacist to be free in order to get drug information.

Upgrades to Systems

Upgrades to online medical sites can help clients pay their bills, get an appointment, or help staff retrieve records faster. Using social media to make upgrades to a medical site could be life-saving; not only does social media allow you to directly relate to your followers, but it can help you specialize onsite to regional needs. This is huge in a global market, where some areas may not be able to run a larger website or might need a slightly different focus in order to clearly navigate.

 

You can even individualize web pages based on different accessibility needs. For example, that colorblindness page probably shouldn’t be full of red and green, and a page for the deaf could offer audio alternatives. Getting that feedback, in real time, from your users, is one of the benefits of upgrading a medical site from real-time social media feedback. If users have different needs, live with different internet speeds, or speak different languages, social media feedback is invaluable.

Information Security

With a growing communication network also comes the need for increased information security and digital backups.

 

Even with backups, about a third of users will lose some of their data through an error with backup methods, meaning that data recovery tools and software are very important — especially when in the medical field. If your primary records are kept online, be sure to have a backup on the cloud and a reliable data recovery tool/resource available if that information goes down; medical records are private, so your recovery resource should be prepared beforehand and discrete. Nothing could be worse than getting a client’s records, losing them, and accidentally giving them medication they are allergic to.  

 

Information security vulnerabilities are a huge liability in digital records, whether you’re talking to patients on social media or just digitizing records. There’s a ton of ways to make your online records safer, not just on social media, but in general. Encrypt files when you send them, verify identity before you send records, keep your servers safe, and ensure human errors stay at a minimum (most data attrition is from human error).

 

There are a few things you can do to reduce human error in your digital world. This is key in the medical industry where human error could cause someone to accidentally leak medical records, violate HIPAA regulations, and potentially lose their job — all because a hacker now knows that Mr. Johnson is allergic to mushrooms. There’s a variety of ways to train human error out of the system and discourage it from happening. For example, this could include standard practices like keeping private cell phones out of main server rooms, because cell phones are an easy security target. They could instead be tucked away in cell phone lockers. You can also train your employees to not download sketchy links in their email, use strong passwords, and let them know where and when they can use the internet for personal time. Nurses looking at Facebook on their lunch break? Not a big deal. Doctors answering questions while logged into the hospital account on a personal device? Kind of a big security risk.

 

Social media is great. It can help our medical community move forward by addressing more patient needs, help patients take their medications, and provide live feedback on how patients and doctors are reacting to the digitization. With digital upgrades comes more security risks. Social media can help patients and doctors alike, but it is essential to not let innovation endanger patient records.


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How patients are using social media

How patients are using social media | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
As patient communities grow stronger, understanding how patients are using social media plays an important role in education, leadership and patient support.

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What Was It My Doctor Said? The Funders Behind the Movement for Open Notes

What Was It My Doctor Said? The Funders Behind the Movement for Open Notes | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
If you want an example of how philanthropy, with relatively tiny resources,
can influence a sprawling $3 trillion healthcare system, look at the
growing push to empower patients to access key medical records. 

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Top 5 reasons why doctors lack self-confidence. And how to fix it.

Top 5 reasons why doctors lack self-confidence. And how to fix it. | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

In the podcast below I interview a dear friend and therapist, Sydney Ashland, who shares the top 10 fears that hold doctors back.

What prevents us from being the doctors we always imagined? We enter medicine as inspired, intelligent and compassionate humanitarians. Soon, we’re cynical and exhausted. How did all these totally amazing and high-functioning people get screwed up so fast? Attention, medical students and doctors: It’s not your fault. Here’s why you are suffering and what you can do about it.


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Self-taught artificial intelligence beats doctors at predicting heart attacks. #hcsmeufr

Self-taught artificial intelligence beats doctors at predicting heart attacks. #hcsmeufr | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
  • Doctors have lots of tools for predicting a patient’s health. But—as even they will tell you—they’re no match for the complexity of the human body. Heart attacks in particular are hard to anticipate. Now, scientists have shown that computers capable of teaching themselves can perform even better than standard medical guidelines, significantly increasing prediction rates. If implemented, the new method could save thousands or even millions of lives a year. 

“I can’t stress enough how important it is,” says Elsie Ross, a vascular surgeon at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who was not involved with the work, “and how much I really hope that doctors start to embrace the use of artificial intelligence to assist us in care of patients.”

 


Via LEO INNOVATION LAB FRANCE, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Giuseppe Fattori
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The top five myths of telehealth

The top five myths of telehealth | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Given telehealth is radically changing how healthcare leaders imagine care delivery, there are a lot of preconceived notions about what works, and what doesn’t.
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Half of hospitals to adopt artificial intelligence within 5 years

Half of hospitals to adopt artificial intelligence within 5 years | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
A new Healthcare IT News and HIMSS Analytics survey found population health and precision medicine among the initiatives where health IT professionals expect AI to have the greatest impact.

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Art Jones's curator insight, April 17, 12:48 PM

There was a time not too long ago when Healthcare was considered part of the late majority (diffusion of innovation curve).  Today healthcare has taken a leadership position, advancing cutting edge technologies to improve the quality of care.

 

Excerpt:

"About 35 percent of healthcare organizations plan to leverage artificial intelligence within two years — and more than half intend to do so within five."

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Digital treatments can be real medicine

Digital treatments can be real medicine | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

What if an app could replace a pill? That’s the big question behind an emerging trend known as “digital therapeutics.” The idea: software that can improve a person’s health as much as a drug can, but without the same cost and side-effects.


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How Wearables Are Revolutionizing Healthcare Services? | An Infographic

How Wearables Are Revolutionizing Healthcare Services? | An Infographic | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Wearables are widely used and many healthcare providers are in tune with the wearable health technology market. From smart watches to fitness bands to Google Glass, wearables are widely adopted by consumers.We have collected data and statistics on the trends of wearables and health technology market from various sources and prepared a infographics which depicts healthcare industry scenarios in collaboration of technology.

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Five Healthcare Trends That Are Being Shaped by Millennials

Five Healthcare Trends That Are Being Shaped by Millennials | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Millennials have influenced many industries, from entertainment to hospitality to retail. Healthcare is no exception. Here are five trends worth reporting.
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70+ Best Health Medical WordPress Themes 2017 Free & Premium - freshDesignweb

70+ Best Health Medical WordPress Themes 2017 Free & Premium - freshDesignweb | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Looking responsive free & premium health medical WordPress themes, this best collection WordPress themes are help for who want to creative website for health care base on WordPress. If you …
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5 Ways Effective Healthcare IT Can Reduce Hospital Costs - HIT Consultant

5 Ways Effective Healthcare IT Can Reduce Hospital Costs - HIT Consultant | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
The focus of federal efforts to incentivize effective healthcare IT adoption has primarily been on EHR, which are oriented around hospitals/physician office
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