Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing
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Smartphones, mobile health apps fuel massive growth in mHealth market

Smartphones, mobile health apps fuel  massive growth in mHealth market | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
The combination of smartphones and mobile health applications and devices are fueling a rapid increase in mHealth services, according to Juniper Research.
eMedToday's insight:

Hospital and Pharma need to embarce smart phone and mhealth.

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eMedToday's curator insight, July 22, 2013 8:15 PM

Big saving

 

According to Juniper, mHealth includes basic health services, remote treatment and diagnosis, and remote patient monitoring, such as cardiac outpatient monitoring and chronic disease management. 

 

Remote patient monitoring of all kinds could save the health care industry $36 billion over the next five years, primarily in North America.



Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing
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Doctors can now prescribe Jabra fitness headphones to treat obesity, cancer and diabetes

Doctors can now prescribe Jabra fitness headphones to treat obesity, cancer and diabetes | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Jabra has teamed up with the TrainerMD health program to help doctors monitor patients' health stats in real time using the company's new Sport Pulse Special Edition fitness earbuds.

The next time you walk into a doctor's office, you might leave with a prescription for a pair of Jabra fitness-tracking headphones.

It's part of a global partnership the audio company announced this week with TrainerMD, the first HIPAA complaint software platform that helps doctors monitor patients' fitness and nutrition in real time.

The 360˚ Health Program makes it easier for physicians, trainers and nurses to collaborate on the needs of patients suffering from obesity, cancer, and diabetes.

Participating patients are prescribed a pair of Jabra Sport Pulse wireless earbuds to incorporate into their exercise routine along with a set of fitness goals tailored to their personal regimen.

The Sport Pulse's integrated heart-rate monitor gets a reading through the ear and also calculates the patient's Vo2 Max level, calories and pace during workouts. The data will then get sent to the accompanying medical team via real-time notifications so everyone gets an ongoing status update to manage the health of the patient.

"This is game changer for patients and health care providers across the country," said Scott Lutch, MD, FACC, CMO, CSCS, NSCA, chief medical officer at TrainerMD. "Not only can patients now educate themselves, but they're also empowered to take control of their health -- and physicians, trainers and nurses are partners in all of that. With the added support of the Jabra Sport Pulse wireless earbuds, meeting individual health objectives is now as easy as listening to music or making a phone call."

 


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Use of Social Media in Healthcare

This is a lecture delivered to first year medical students (and their research mentors) to encourage use of social media in medical education. To enhance communication between medical students and their mentors, we shall use platforms such as facebook, twitter and slideshare.

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Mayo Clinic Expands Emergency Telemedicine Practice

Mayo Clinic Expands Emergency Telemedicine Practice | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
ROCHESTER,  Minn. — Mayo Clinic continues to expand its national leadership in the telemedicine arena through its newly announced s…
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The next wave of transformative digital health

The next wave of transformative digital health | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Digital healthcare investing has gone through several waves: 2013 was the year of consumer wearables, 2014 of healthcare big data, 2015 of virtual care delivery and 2016, so far, has been about payer disruption. 2017 will be a return to the core practice of medicine: technology that enables providers and biopharma to extend their reach and take greater risk for outcomes.
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Healthy innovation: Why health care companies are starting to look like tech companies

Healthy innovation: Why health care companies are starting to look like tech companies | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

Four significant factors are forcing health care companies to move faster and push technological innovation more quickly.


Via Adrian Adewunmi Ph.D, Philippe Marchal
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Hospitals Are Partnering With Uber to Get Patients to Checkups

Hospitals Are Partnering With Uber to Get Patients to Checkups | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Hospitals Are Partnering With Uber to Get Patients to Checkups

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B2B Healthcare Marketing by the Numbers

B2B Healthcare Marketing by the Numbers | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Effective B2B healthcare marketing needs to approach its target audience and industry differently, and we’ve got the statistics to prove it.

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Step by Step - How to Improve Patient Access at Your Health System

Step by Step - How to Improve Patient Access at Your Health System | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
What is Patient Access?
In the most basic sense, patient access refers to the ability, now more than ever, for patients and their families to take charge of their own health care.
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Opportunity Insights: Marketing to Hispanic Demographics for Healthcare Services

Opportunity Insights: Marketing to Hispanic Demographics for Healthcare Services | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Reaching and attracting new patients in the Hispanic audience is a healthcare marketing opportunity that can’t be ignored.
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How we’re mending our healthcare system using data

How we’re mending our healthcare system using data | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Lisa Kaufmann, Global Head of Mirum Health, explains how digital information is the medical industry’s new wonder drug.
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The A to Z Guide to Telemedicine and Telehealth Terminology

The A to Z Guide to Telemedicine and Telehealth Terminology | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Telemedicine and Telehealth is an exciting new area of medicine that is opening up new opportunities for better care for patients, and more effective treatment delivery for physicians.
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The doctor is online, anytime — it's the freewheeling world of eHealth

The doctor is online, anytime — it's the freewheeling world of eHealth | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Telehealth is growing in B.C. with new businesses putting patients in video contact with doctors
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Healthcare marketers: Don't forget about the baby boomers

Healthcare marketers: Don't forget about the baby boomers | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

An 86-year-old grandmother in Liverpool recently performed a Google search that blew up the online universe. She entered: “Please translate these roman numerals mcmxcviii thank you.” Her post provided a timely reminder that while the aging population may speak a different language than the younger folks — and have different values and needs — its members are quite connected to the digital world.

Baby boomers, approximately born between 1946 and 1964, make up the majority of this aging group. They number more than 76 million in the U.S., and by 2029 they will account for a 73% increase in the population aged 65 and up. They now spend more money on technology than any other age group — and, what's more, two-thirds of them are now active on social media. According to recent research by content marketing agency Fractl, boomers are 19% likelier to share Facebook content than any other generation. Consider the myth about digitally challenged boomers to be well and truly debunked.

See also: Leadership Exchange: Engaging the Millennial Doctor

It follows, therefore, that this is a ripe demographic for digital health services and devices. In fact, it's now a matter of urgency: Boomers are less healthy and more costly, from a systemic perspective, than previous generations. According to the American Hospital Association, 37 million boomers will be managing multiple chronic conditions by 2030. One in four will have diabetes, almost half will suffer from arthritis, and more than a third will be classified as obese.

“The boomer group is a sick population,” says Zoe Dunn, principal, Hale Advisors. “They are heavily taxing our healthcare system.”

THE EMERGING CONSENSUS

Medicare spending topped $632 billion in 2015. The Congressional Budget Office projects an average annual increase of 1.4% per beneficiary between now and 2024. The most prevalent boomer ailments are interrelated, and lifestyle choices affect many of them.


The emerging consensus is that technology innovation offers the best hope of changing behaviors — that by approaching boomers with a variety of tech-related services and tools, healthcare and pharma can play a vital role in improving outcomes and reducing costs. The good news is that boomers, on the whole, willingly embrace digital healthcare. Decision Resources Group found in its 2015 ePharma Consumer study that 51% of U.S. adults, aged 55 and above, had researched Rx info online in the previous 12 months (versus 62% for all adults). Furthermore, 21% of the older demographic had done so using a mobile device.

See also: Why UCB isn't afraid of social media

Maryann Kuzel, SVP, head of healthcare strategy at Rapp, notes that a defining boomer characteristic is their high physician-trust level — so much so that she characterizes them as survivors of the physician-centric era. “They are somewhat more traditional in their healthcare beliefs and behaviors,” she explains. “They check in with their doctor more than other sources to seek help with both illness and wellness.”

However, such interactions are becoming increasingly digital. A recent Harris Poll commissioned by Salesforce showed that boomers are communicating with their primary care physicians via portals to look at health data (29%), view test results (24%), fill or refill prescriptions (12%), and check insurance coverage (10%). What's more, 57% of boomers said they would be open to virtual treatment options; 51% said they would choose a PCP who offers a patient app over one who does not; 37% said they would choose a PCP who offers virtual treatment over one who does not; and 29% said they would choose a PCP who uses data from patients' wearable devices over one who does not.

Managed care, too, is an important part of the digital health ecosystem, and insurers would be wise to focus more on aging populations. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Rhode Island recently reached out to its newly eligible Medicare population for the first time via digital and social channels — with spectacular results, according to DMN. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Rhode Island saw a 38% increase in online Medicare revenue, as well as a 50% application conversion rate (up from 27%). Furthermore, it reports that 50% of its Medicare traffic now comes via mobile.

WEARABLES YES, APPS MAYBE

We now know that boomers are searching for health info online, consuming and sharing content, using smartphones, and looking forward to a future of tele­medicine. What about wearables and apps?

Dunn reports on her mother-in-law's unwavering dedication to reaching her daily step total. In terms of the wider boomer picture, the Harris Salesforce study reports that 20% of boomers currently own a wearable health-tracking device (13% fitness-related, 3% consumer-related, and 4% clinical-related). Of those owners, 74% say they would want their doctor to have access to data from their devices. Perhaps surprisingly, they are more likely to wear their devices daily (66%) than any other generation (55% for all users, and just 43% for millennials).

See also: Non-profit behind Free Killer Tan wants parents to practice sun safety

Also likely to be of interest to healthcare stakeholders: Forty-five percent of boomers said they would wear a tracking device given to them by their HCP in exchange for access to data, while 47% said they would wear one given to them by their insurance company in exchange for potentially better rates based on health data.

Boomers fare less well on app adoption: Nineteen percent said they use one app to track health, nutrition, or fitness data, while just 9% report using two or more apps. Of the latter group, 93% would like their apps to integrate and share data.

The well-documented burdens of the app world also apply to the boomer market. The majority of downloaded apps are rarely or never used — there are around 165,000 health and fitness apps. Another roadblock includes the lack of integration or inter­operability between chronic disease apps, particularly for users managing coexisting conditions. There may also be a disconnect between young app developers and older boomer users, especially around special requirements regarding hearing, eyesight, and dexterity.


“GET OLD” WITH PFIZER

In short, med-tech companies need to work more closely with boomers to develop innovative products of true value to both users and the healthcare system. One pharma company on such a path is Pfizer. Back in 2012 Pfizer launched its Get Old program to “challenge misperceptions of aging” and “drive conversations that inspire people of all ages to take action on their own health and explore new opportunities.” Get Old now boasts a 400,000-strong community via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and its website.

“We've got a very active Facebook community and we recently launched on Instagram,” notes Sally Jacob, senior director, communications, Pfizer. “We've found that people love sharing motivational stories and images that turn conventional ideas about aging upside down.”

Pfizer recently launched a unique partnership with crowd-funding platform Indiegogo. Project Get Old challenged its own community members (along with Indiegogo's army of entrepreneurs) to come up with “the next big idea in healthy aging.”

The best idea will receive $50,000 in funding and an opportunity to meet with a team of Pfizer experts to help make that idea a reality. “It's a creative way to extend our mission from concept and conversation into something that could become a concrete program or product,” Jacob says.

At this point Pfizer is probably the exception rather than the rule. Matthew Arnold, principal analyst, DRG, believes pharma should place a greater digital focus on boomers. “If you're marketing a prescription drug to an older audience and you're not really investing in digital, you're missing an opportunity to engage half of your target demographic,” he says.


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Instagram and Clinical Infectious Diseases

Instagram and Clinical Infectious Diseases | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

TO THE EDITOR—We read the article by Goff et al [1] with great interest regarding the relevance of social media (SM) platform Twitter to infectious diseases clinicians. We concur with the authors regarding the relevance of SM tools to infectious diseases practice and wish to call attention to the photograph-based SM platform, Instagram, as an emerging site of interest.

Instagram is a free SM platform launched in October of 2010 that has been a part of Facebook, Inc., since April 2012 [2]. The platform reports a community of 300 million users as of December 2014. Each day users from around the world (>70% are outside the US) register >2.5 billion “likes” and share >70 million photos. Data from an American survey in September 2014 indicate 26% of online adults use Instagram, and half of Internet users age 18 to 29 years of age use Instagram [3]. Beyond the large number of engaged adults (particularly young adults), it is notable that about half of all Instagram users access the site at least once daily.


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FDA declines to scrutinize claims by “low risk” mhealth apps, devices. What’s the takeaway?

FDA declines to scrutinize claims by “low risk” mhealth apps, devices. What’s the takeaway? | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

FDA said it will ease up vetting general health and wellness apps, but it will scrutinize clinical applications and devices. Does this mean the FTC will step up?

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued final guidance on “low-risk” digital health apps and devices for general health management 18 months after it  came out with draft guidance.

The document offers information on the kinds of apps and devices for which it will and won’t take action. Apps promoting or maintaining a healthy weight or to assist with weight loss goals and healthy eating are OK.  The guidance says that companies can make claims that their apps and devices can help with healthy lifestyle choices to reduce the risk of chronic conditions such as Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease or improve their management. But those lifestyle choices have to be advocated by the likes of the American Heart Association or American Association of Clinical Endocrinologist or peer-reviewed medical journals.

So what are some examples of what’s not OK? Claims that a product will treat or diagnose obesity, an eating disorder, such as bullimia or anorexia, or an anxiety disorder. Digital health entrepreneurs are also encouraged to ask themselves the following questions:

Is the product invasive?
Is the product implanted?
Does the product involve an intervention or technology that may pose a risk to
the safety of users and other persons if specific regulatory controls are not applied, such as risks from lasers or radiation exposure?

If the answer is yes to any of the above, they need to assume their products are considered clinical applications, will be scrutinized and should act accordingly.

My takeaway from the guidance is twofold. It’s a question of resources. Although there are thousands of general wellness apps, more and more medical device and pharma companies are developing digital health devices and apps of their own.  Second, the Federal Trade Commission has shown it is willing to take action against companies that it deems to be making false health claims about their apps and devices.

 


Via rob halkes, Pharma Guy, Giuseppe Fattori
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rob halkes's curator insight, August 1, 4:50 AM

Health apps should do what they promise! At the moment they need to take a diagnostic feature and use personal physics to arrive at advice or conclusions about the health status of the person who uses the app, they are considered not to be 'just' an "app" but a medical device. At that condition they need to adhere to and be certified by several criteria attached to 'medical devices". Developers should know about this, which the more professional ones will. Rightly so!

PatientView has developed a website MyHealthApps that presents an inventory of the better Health Apps.

Pharma Guy's curator insight, August 1, 8:38 AM

Also read “FDA Won't Regulate ‘Low-Risk’ mHealth Apps as Medical Devices. But Battle Looms Over Defining ‘Low Risk’"; http://sco.lt/5kkDyr

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The Bright Future of Pharmacies - The Medical Futurist

The Bright Future of Pharmacies - The Medical Futurist | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
The rapid development of medical technology affects every aspect of healthcare – and pharmacies cannot escape its transformative power either.
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5 Design Principles for eHealth – User Experience Design

5 Design Principles for eHealth – User Experience Design | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Why doctors hate their software and how you can fix it

 

“I’ll tell you how to make documentation easier. Throw all the computers out the window.”

That tip came from an ED doctor during some recent research. I laughed it off at first, but he wasn’t joking. He went on to describe the battle that is recording patient notes. What used to take him a minute on paper is now several painful minutes of selecting check boxes and menu items on his whiz-bang electronic health record.

Doctors in the US now spend an extra 4 hours a week adding patients notes to their electronic health records (EHRs). These systems claim to save time and help people provide better care, but do they?

The problem we see is that e-health products are usually developed as technology projects rather than tools to support healthcare workers. They’re born out of questions like “how can we connect all these systems?” or “how can we keep everyone’s health information secure?” Technology is important, but if a doctor can’t get a clear picture of their patient’s health, none of this stuff matters.

I’ve spent the last few years trying to understand what healthcare professionals need from their software. We created these design principles after seeing the same user experience problems trip people up again and again.

If you’re creating an eHealth product, consider how you’re addressing the following problems.


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Healthcare 2025 - Forbes

Healthcare 2025 - Forbes | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
The future of medicine starts here.

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Julie O'Donnell's curator insight, August 17, 12:36 PM
Interesting series on Healthcare 2025 from Forbes. Touches on trends such as the rise of the healthcare billionaire - 365% growth in that category since 2007. There is also a 450% increase in investment in digital health companies in Q1 2016 as compared to Q1 2011. Amazing stuff. 
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The Digital Health Tech Vision 2016

The Digital Health Technology Vision 2016 reveals five trends that prove winning in the digital age hinges on people. Keeping up with changing technology is vital, but it’s just as important to evolve the consumer experience, methods of care delivery and career development opportunities for the healthcare workforce.

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Nilambari Mane's curator insight, August 22, 3:25 AM
Top 5 trends in Digital Health 
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Code of Conduct on privacy for mHealth apps has been finalised

Code of Conduct on privacy for mHealth apps has been finalised | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
The Code of Conduct on privacy for mobile health apps has now been formally submitted for comments to the Art 29 Data Protection Working Party. Once approved by this independent EU advisory group, the Code will be applied in practice: App developers will be able to voluntarily commit to follow its rules, which are based on EU data protection legislation.
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Aligned TeleHealth Raises $12M to Fuel Telepsychiatry Consultations

Aligned TeleHealth Raises $12M to Fuel Telepsychiatry Consultations | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
Aligned TeleHealth, Inc., a Calabasas, CA-based healthcare provider full, end-to-end telemedicine solutions has raised $12M in Series A funding.
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6 Best Practice Traits You Want in a Healthcare Advertising Agency

6 Best Practice Traits You Want in a Healthcare Advertising Agency | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
If you have an existing relationship with a healthcare advertising agency, or shaping a better partnership for success, here are the important guideposts.
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5 Tips To Increase Sales for Digital Health Products — Tradecraft

5 Tips To Increase Sales for Digital Health Products — Tradecraft | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
It’s an exciting time for tech startups operating in the healthcare space.
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Why the world’s most tech-obsessed nation is resisting virtual doctor’s visits

Why the world’s most tech-obsessed nation is resisting virtual doctor’s visits | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
At a glance, South Korea looks ripe for widespread adoption of telemedicine, which enables doctors to treat patients remotely by means of videoconferencing and other forms of telecommunication.
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Telemedicine: A Fundamental Addition to Contemporary Medical Curricula – by Christopher Lemon

Telemedicine: A Fundamental Addition to Contemporary Medical Curricula – by Christopher Lemon | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it
“Despite the exciting potential of telemedicine, I have often encountered caution and concern when discussing the subject with colleagues and clinical
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