Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing
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Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing
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mHealth may have lots of money, but it still has a long way to go - There is no doubt that mHealth is going to happen, but where, how and when depends on integration of pharma, insurers and physici...

mHealth may have lots of money, but it still has a long way to go - There is no doubt that mHealth is going to happen, but where, how and when depends on integration of pharma, insurers and physici... | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

Studies indicate people with chronic conditions want to use mHealth devices at home for care management, but the devices and apps they’re trying are too complex or confusing. More than 100,000 (health) applications are now available in the leading app stores, and the assortment is constantly growing,” says a BAEK study that was discussed at the congress. But only a fraction of the programs are certified as medical products.Mobile health apps for smartphones and tablet computers are especially popular with young people. And demand is rising. There’s a caveat, though. An app can never replace a doctor – at best it can only supplement one, but the problem is that too many patients may be relying on apps that have not been medically tested. The other problem is that many mobile app developers are lax when it comes to data privacy. Users should be careful not to thoughtlessly share personal information.

Chronic Conditions…

A report from digital health analyst Parks Associates indicates 27 percent of those surveyed with a chronic condition want a mobile health device that tracks their condition – yet significant numbers also report that the devices they now have are too complicated to use or don’t work properly.

A lot of patients simply do not have a good grasp on health metrics – meaning they either don’t know what their current health metrics are, or they do not know what they should be, the survey noted. Plus, even when patients do know their numbers, it is not guaranteed that they understand what those numbers mean. To make sense of health metrics and chronic disease management, patients need support from their healthcare providers.

Accuracy Issues?

An independent study of 18 popular mHealth sensors used by people with diabetes finds that two-thirds aren’t meeting standards for accuracy, potentially putting those users at risk.

The analysis of 18 FDA-approved blood glucose monitoring systems (BGMSs) by the Diabetes Technology Society found that only six meters recorded blood glucose levels within 15 percent of mg/dl of the laboratory value in at least 95 percent of the tests. In layman’s terms, this means a person with diabetes can be confident that a blood glucose reading is accurate 19 times out of 20.

Compared with the traditional method of in-office visits, does self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) via digital tools result in better health and wellness for people with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes?  In the case of a 450-person cohort studied at 15 primary care practices across the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill health system, the answer was a flat “No.”

The patients were randomized into three different groups. Two groups were given the Telcare connected blood glucose monitor, with one of those groups simply checking in with the device and the other doing the same plus receiving “enhanced patient feedback” (in the form of automated, one-way messages delivered directly on the meter). The third group did not receive a device. After the patients were randomized into groups, their primary care clinicians worked with them to manage their conditions, with those whose patients were using the Telcare devices receiving a summary of the data via their electronic health records.

Researchers were measuring outcomes based on hemoglobin A1c levels and health-related quality of life. Over a year’s time, there were no significant differences in hemoglobin A1c levels nor health-related quality of life over all three groups.

“Incorporating technology into self-management activities has been touted as potentially transformative for patients, and to date some smaller studies support this notion. However, our findings do not,” the researchers wrote in an article published by the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Pharma may have the solution

Can you imagine a mHealth app developed by pharma that had been clinically tested to show that it provided both accurate data and improved patient outcomes? It would ne recommended by physicians and insurers alike and I’m sure widely adopted.  mHealth developers need to work closely with pharma R&D people yo better understand the clinical trial process.


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8 tips for motivating virtual teams

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Social Media And Ethical Concerns For Healthcare Professionals

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While social media use in healthcare has the potential to bring value to patient-provider relationships, it is not without its ethical and professional challenges. This presentation looks at those challenges and suggests ways to deal with them.

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Art Jones's curator insight, August 29, 11:53 AM

Risk vs. Reward

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Here’s what’s exciting about FDA’s latest digital health plans and what’s to come

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The Top Medical Specialties with the Biggest Potential in the Future - The Medical Futurist

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Artificial intelligence, wearable sensors, virtual reality, medical robots are changing the way patients and doctors think and act about healthcare.
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AI beats best cardiologists at detecting most arrhythmias

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A team of researchers from Stanford University, working with cardiac monitoring company iRhythm, have created an AI algorithm that, in a small proof-of-concept trial, outperformed board-certified cardiologists at identifying various types of arrhythmias from ECGs.
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The delicate practice of social media for doctors

The delicate practice of social media for doctors | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

A study by researchers at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire, US found that 72% of fresh urology graduates had public Facebook profiles of which 40% contained “potentially objectionable” content.

This included pictures of the doctors’ drunk and medical ethics violations such as revealing their patient’s health information. The study brought to light the concern that a physician’s social media use has the potential to break patient trust.

Lead researcher Dr Kevin Koo said, "we all have a role to play in making sure the high standards of patient confidentiality and the doctor-patient relationship are upheld."

Many have examined the implications of HCPs utilising social media


The issue has been a concern for the medical profession for some time now with many GPs surgeries, hospitals, universities and medical societies creating guidelines on what they deem as inappropriate online behaviour.

For example, the American Medical Association issued guidelines in 2010encouraging doctors to "consider separating personal and professional content online" and reiterated the importance of patient privacy. Despite this, Koo is uncertain how many doctors "even know that guidelines exist."

The study found one case in which a patient’s x-ray and name were included in a social media post. Another study conducted by researchers at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden found that of 13,000 tweets by 237 doctors, 6% were a potential breach of patient confidentiality.

Interestingly, in a study by researchers at the University of California San Francisco, in which 48 medical boards were asked which of ten social media scenarios would prompt an investigation, most said misleading claims about treatment outcomes would. In a separate case in January, a Canadian nurse, who posted about her grandfather’s inadequate care in another clinic, was penalised.

Maintaining a healthy work-personal life balance


It can be difficult not to cross the line into prohibiting a doctor’s right to share their lives or their opinions however as under “potentially objectionable” content, posts expressing views on religion and politics were also included in the New Hampshire study.

“No one expects doctors to never post an opinion,” Koo said. "We realise they don't live in a vacuum.”

Dr Matthew DeCamp, from the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics in Baltimore suggests doctors "ask yourself if this is something you really want in a public space.” Some doctors have mastered this balance well and created stellar social media presences.

Most guidelines seem to contain the same key behavioral rules and recommendations. Firstly all doctors must be accountable for all content posted on any of their social medical accounts. Secondly it is advised that doctors do not accept friend or follow requests from current or previous patients and in general avoid interacting with them online.

Additionally, patient photos or patient-specific information should not be posted online under any circumstances. Doctors should also be mindful that others may look up to them for general medical advice and so if they do post any, it should be up to date and as accurate as possible.

However social media can also help the medical profession in general as a means to market services and promote good health practices and there are a number of techniques that can help create the best website for a medical centre. MIMS


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Art Jones's curator insight, July 24, 2:42 PM

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Gwyneth Paltrow  launched GOOP in 2008, today it represents the leading edge of the groundswell that is the search for optimal wellness. Does Goop offer Real Value or Just More BS?

 

The following excerpt is shared by an MD who deals with patients coming to her office for care yet, predisposed to want this test and lets check for these others things too, please.

 

People on both sides of the conversation are fired up:

"Jennifer Gunter, an OB/GYN and pain-medicine physician in Toronto, writes a frank and often funny blog that often takes on Paltrow and Goop. One post reads: “Your goopshit bothers me because it affects my patients. They read your crackpot theories and they stop eating tomatoes (side note, if tomatoes are toxic why do Italians have a longer life expectancy than Americans?) or haven’t had a slice of bread for two years, they spend money on organic tampons they don’t need, they ask for unindicated testing for adrenal fatigue (and often pay a lot via co-payments or paying out of pocket), or they obsess that they have systemic Candida (they don’t)."

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Oscar Health Partners With Cleveland Clinic On Obamacare Exchange

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Oscar Health will partner with the Cleveland Clinic to offer individual coverage in Ohio on the public exchange under the Affordable Care Act.
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The Future of Medicine is Online and Social 

The Future of Medicine is Online and Social  | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

Having your regular, yearly exam over Facebook isn’t a future too far off. An interconnected world is becoming increasingly useful to both professionals and patients. Today, social media is more than just liking pictures of your grandma’s dogs; it is helping rural patients receive diagnoses, helping them take their medication correctly, and moving outdated medical centers into the 21st century. On the other hand, digitizing patient records also carries hidden dangers.

 

There’s a future in a socially driven medical world. Where innovation take us this year depends on how fast people want to move forward, and how fast people can be trained to reduce information loss.

Diagnosis

Telemedicine has been around for a long time, it’s broken through the confines of the telephone, moved onto Wi-Fi, and allowed doctors to talk with patients, answer their questions, and even recommend their next moves. There’s even a free app where you can just ask doctors questions. Moving telemedicine forward helps patients avoid needless hospital visits, gives doctors access to rural patients who are chronically underserved, and helps reduce cost, which is very important in American medical care. This would be especially effective if telemedicine moved away from phone calls and specific apps, and onto mainstream social media since people still use apps, but not many apps, and not with any frequency.

Taking Medication Incorrectly

Incorrectly taking medication is a big problem in America. 75 percent of Americans have trouble taking their medication as directed; that’s a huge amount of people who are not taking what they need to get better in a way that will make them better. Having an outlet on social media, or on an app where patients can confirm their medical information, will help them take prescriptions correctly, especially with reminders that pop up, or if it could alert the user to warn about medications that should not be mixed. This is especially helpful for people who don’t want to wait for a pharmacist to be free in order to get drug information.

Upgrades to Systems

Upgrades to online medical sites can help clients pay their bills, get an appointment, or help staff retrieve records faster. Using social media to make upgrades to a medical site could be life-saving; not only does social media allow you to directly relate to your followers, but it can help you specialize onsite to regional needs. This is huge in a global market, where some areas may not be able to run a larger website or might need a slightly different focus in order to clearly navigate.

 

You can even individualize web pages based on different accessibility needs. For example, that colorblindness page probably shouldn’t be full of red and green, and a page for the deaf could offer audio alternatives. Getting that feedback, in real time, from your users, is one of the benefits of upgrading a medical site from real-time social media feedback. If users have different needs, live with different internet speeds, or speak different languages, social media feedback is invaluable.

Information Security

With a growing communication network also comes the need for increased information security and digital backups.

 

Even with backups, about a third of users will lose some of their data through an error with backup methods, meaning that data recovery tools and software are very important — especially when in the medical field. If your primary records are kept online, be sure to have a backup on the cloud and a reliable data recovery tool/resource available if that information goes down; medical records are private, so your recovery resource should be prepared beforehand and discrete. Nothing could be worse than getting a client’s records, losing them, and accidentally giving them medication they are allergic to.  

 

Information security vulnerabilities are a huge liability in digital records, whether you’re talking to patients on social media or just digitizing records. There’s a ton of ways to make your online records safer, not just on social media, but in general. Encrypt files when you send them, verify identity before you send records, keep your servers safe, and ensure human errors stay at a minimum (most data attrition is from human error).

 

There are a few things you can do to reduce human error in your digital world. This is key in the medical industry where human error could cause someone to accidentally leak medical records, violate HIPAA regulations, and potentially lose their job — all because a hacker now knows that Mr. Johnson is allergic to mushrooms. There’s a variety of ways to train human error out of the system and discourage it from happening. For example, this could include standard practices like keeping private cell phones out of main server rooms, because cell phones are an easy security target. They could instead be tucked away in cell phone lockers. You can also train your employees to not download sketchy links in their email, use strong passwords, and let them know where and when they can use the internet for personal time. Nurses looking at Facebook on their lunch break? Not a big deal. Doctors answering questions while logged into the hospital account on a personal device? Kind of a big security risk.

 

Social media is great. It can help our medical community move forward by addressing more patient needs, help patients take their medications, and provide live feedback on how patients and doctors are reacting to the digitization. With digital upgrades comes more security risks. Social media can help patients and doctors alike, but it is essential to not let innovation endanger patient records.


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How patients are using social media

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Communication improves BP medication adherence in low-income patients

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WeHealth by Serviert and CardioRenal launch e-tools to provide better support to heart failure patients

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Competition can’t reduce health care costs if the prices are a secret

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The Pediatric Insider © 2017 Roy Benaroch, MD Competition often works. Competing dry cleaners or donut shops must either improve the quality of their product or keep their prices low, or customers will go somewhere else for their cruller fix. In time, the better businesses – the ones that provide tastier pastries at a lower…
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It’s Only a Matter of Time: Your Hospital is a Ransomware Target

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NewYork-Presbyterian’s foray into pediatric telehealth

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Where is precision medicine headed? - Medical Economics

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Physicians have practiced precision medicine, defined as the tailoring of medical treatment by taking into account individual differences in people’s genes, environments and lifestyles, for decades. The main difference today is that technological advances have given us greater power to combine comprehensive data collected over time about an individual tohelp provide appropriate care.

 

Further reading: Here's how physicians can impact healthcare policies

 

The precision medicine initiative, now known as the All of Us Research Program, launched by the National Institutes of Health, is an ambitious effort to gather data for over a million people living in the U.S. It will likely accelerate precision medicine research with the goal of eventually benefiting everyone by providing information that healthcare providers can use in the clinic. However, there are aspects of precision medicine that have emerged, or are beginning to emerge, in different clinics across the country and are being used to benefit patients today.

Pharmacogenomics (PGx), the study of genetic variations that cause individuals to respond differently to medications, is the most widely used form of precision medicine today. Virtually all of us harbor at least one genetic change that predisposes us to metabolize a common medication differently than the average person. A PGx panel with multiple genes can provide gene-drug guidelines for dozens of medications, including common ones like Warfarin, Clopidogrel or various antidepressants.

 

Trending on our site: Waiting on Congress to fix healthcare could be hazardous to physicians

 


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6 Digital Transformations In The Medical Industry

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Art Jones's curator insight, July 27, 11:12 AM

This article shows how digital and big data are ushering in the rapid evolution of health and wellness care.

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5 Modern Rules for Effective Hospital Marketing

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Confessions of a Dr. Google addict

Confessions of a Dr. Google addict | Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing | Scoop.it

I found a lump in my neck when I was 20. It was soft and the size of a small grape. To make matters worse, it was the middle of my exam period.

Anxious and out of energy, I do the only thing I could think of to help calm myself down. I open up Google, find a medical diagnosis website and ask it just what the hell is wrong with me. Just 0.25 seconds later, I had my answer, and I feel the sharp pain of a lump in the centre of my chest. I probably had thyroid cancer. Or lymphoma. Or possibly HIV.

And just like that, I had become a patient of ‘Dr. Google.’

The internet has transformed industry. You can order your groceries, download movies and trade stocks online. Previously these industries required separate commitments. You had to go to the grocery store, head to the movie store or have a stockbroker. Most of these changes have been positive. They help us multitask and complete chores quicker. But the instant nature of Google raises an important question: should all conveniences shift towards the computer screen?

 


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24 Outstanding Statistics & Figures on How Social Media has Impacted the Health Care Industry

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