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Lawsuit argues pizza driver, his employer were negligent in doctor’s death | Wichita Eagle

Lawsuit argues pizza driver, his employer were negligent in doctor’s death | Wichita Eagle | Hospitality Law | Scoop.it
The wife and daughter of a well-known Wichita pediatrician struck and killed by a hit-and-run driver while out for a late-night jog two years ago has sued the driver – who was reportedly delivering pizza at the time of the incident – and t...

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Laura Barrio's comment, April 25, 2014 1:00 AM
The pizza driver was absolutely negligent, and should be held responsible for Mr. Whiteside's death. There is no excuse for why he ran the man over, and why he would flee the scene instead of helping him. Whether Pizza Hut is negligent is debatable because even if they "properly trained and supervised" their drivers about texting while driving, there is no guarantee or way of guaranteeing that each individual driver will not text and drive, just as any other driver on the road.
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Former Chipotle Worker Claims She Was Fired For Taking Time To Heal After Abusive Situation

Former Chipotle Worker Claims She Was Fired For Taking Time To Heal After Abusive Situation | Hospitality Law | Scoop.it
A former New York City Chipotle worker is suing the Mexican eatery, claiming she was fired from her job because she took time off to recover from an abusive situation involving her boyfriend. She s...

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Laura Barrio's comment, April 25, 2014 12:18 AM
Since the article is only able to show the employee's side of the situation because Chipotle refuses to make a comment, my first impression is that although she was injured, she might have taken too much time off that did not coincide with the company's standards for injured time off. Since she was no injured at work, it is tricky to know how much time is appropriate to be given off, even with a doctor's note. She could have taken advantage of time off (which could have been paid or not), and when she returned, it was grounds for termination under corporate standards. The manager saying that she had "too many outside issues" is not grounds for dismissal, so he might have given her more insight on why she was fired, but since Chipotle is not commenting, it is hard to determine if it was unjust or not.
Elena J. Quintero's comment, April 26, 2014 11:15 PM
Simply put this is discrimination. Her personal life outside of the office should not be considered in the office. Chipotle is evening stating that it has nothing to do with her performance. I think that the employee should sue Chipotle.
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This New York restaurant takes Facebook stalking to a new level

This New York restaurant takes Facebook stalking to a new level | Hospitality Law | Scoop.it
You can't hide from New York's Eleven Madison Park. As New York's Alan Sytsma explains at Grub Street, mâitre d' Justin Roller googles everyone who has a reservation at the restaurant on any given night. He searches for personal information — birth date, anniversary, profession — so he can give proper salutations when the party arrives. Once he discovers something concrete, he jumps on it. "If I find out a guest is from Montana, and I know we have a server from there, we'll put them together," Roller explains. Systma adds:
Same goes for guests who own jazz clubs, who can be paired with a sommelier that happens to be into jazz. In other words, before customers even step through the door, the restaurant's staff has a pretty good idea of the things it can do to specifically blow their minds. [Grub Street]
That attention to detail makes Eleven Madison Park an intense place to work; the training manual for front-of-the-house staff is 97 pages long, and it even specifies the type of socks that can be worn by staffers. Every part of the process is designed to keep the best staff around, so the restaurant can run smoothly and the guests can appreciate the personalized service.
While some might think having a complete stranger know everything about you down to your Social Security number (just kidding... I think) is kind of nutty, general manager Kirk Kelewae argues that it's part of the restaurant's charm. "We want to evoke a sense of being welcomed home," he says. Read more about Eleven Madison Park's blend of old-school service and internet sleuthing at Grub Street.

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Laura Barrio's comment, April 25, 2014 12:46 AM
I believe that customer/ guest interaction can play a larger role in a guest's experience in dining than food at times, and so I understand what the GM of Eleven Madison Park is trying to do. I work for a prestigeous hotel that collects as much guest information as possible, especially in the restaurant. Knowing basic information about a guest and accommodating or complimenting them is nothing bad, especially since it is only information that is already publicly displayed on their facebook pages. I think the GM is doing a good thing for their restaurant, but maybe he shouldn't be so open about his methods so that guest's don't feel so intruded.