Horn APHuG
Follow
Find
166 views | +2 today
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Regional Geography
onto Horn APHuG
Scoop.it!

March Madness: Make your picks in the Vatican's Sweet Sistine brackets!

March Madness: Make your picks in the Vatican's Sweet Sistine brackets! | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
More than 100 Roman Catholic cardinals will gather in the Sistine Chapel in March. One will emerge as pope. Who will it be? The "Sweet Sistine" is our guess at the top candidates from each continent.

Via KochAPGeography, Matthew Wahl, Seth Dixon
more...
KochAPGeography's curator insight, February 27, 2013 8:50 AM

With more than 1billion followers, the geographic diversity of today's Catholic church is vast.  With the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI, questions abound as to the identity of the next pope.  The Religion News Service takes this question to the next level.  Considering the popularity of betting services around the world, the bracket concept isn't that unlikely.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 2013 7:12 AM

I won't pretend to know much about Catholic sucession, but this is pretty awesome. 

Horn APHuG
AP Human Geography
Curated by Greg Hill
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Race & Ethnicity
Scoop.it!

Oxford University's cultural elitism has been exposed by this student campaign

Oxford University's cultural elitism has been exposed by this student campaign | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“ Harriet Walker: With 'I, too, am Oxford' minority students tried to highlight the prejudices they face, but a rival campaign hijacks their argument”
Via Monique
Greg Hill's insight:
Age old issue coming to the forefront
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from The Geo Feed
Scoop.it!

What Are The Rules For Changing A Country's Borders?

What Are The Rules For Changing A Country's Borders? | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“ Drawing borders feels like an anachronism that was the domain of 19th-century diplomats, but Crimea shows that national boundaries still aren't considered fixed in many parts of the world.”
Via geo-pickmeup.com
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from The Asian Food Gazette.
Scoop.it!

Hair for food - Nepali Times

Hair for food - Nepali Times | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“Nepali Times is an English-language weekly newspaper published by Himalmedia Private Limited. It provides Nepal News, News of Nepal, News on Business, economics & more news from including depth reporting, expert commentaries and analysis on Nepal.”
Via Frank Kusters
Greg Hill's insight:
India is also a leading exporter of human hair also known as "Remy"
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from AP Human Geography Herm
Scoop.it!

Why are we building new walls to divide us?

Why are we building new walls to divide us? | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“ We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations”
Via Allison Anthony
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from AP Human Geography Herm
Scoop.it!

Tatars in Crimea: caught between the west and a hard place - video

“ A correspondent for ATR Crimean Tatar TV reports from a tense confrontation at a Ukrainian military base as pro-Russian forces attempt to take over a fuel depot in Simferopal”
Via Allison Anthony
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

West Virginia is the most miserable state in the country

West Virginia is the most miserable state in the country | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“ People hate living in West Virginia. And love living in North Dakota.”
Via Matt Richardson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from AP Human Geography at West High School
Scoop.it!

Wheat Atlas - information about wheat all around the world

Wheat Atlas - information about wheat all around the world | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“ Wheat Atlas is an online portal to relevant information on wheat production, markets and research.”
Via Jane Ellingson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from AP Human Geography Herm
Scoop.it!

China Is Launching the Most Impressive Water Pipeline Project Ever

China Is Launching the Most Impressive Water Pipeline Project Ever | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“ Former Chinese premier Wen Jiabao wasn’t being dramatic in 1999 when he called the country’s water problems a threat to the “survival of the Chinese nation.””
Via Allison Anthony
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

A House United

A House United | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
"Why analysts touting Ukraine's East-West division are just plain wrong."This neat picture [of East/West divisions] becomes muddled in the environs of Luhansk and Donetsk. For example, the official website of the Bilokurakyn district of Luhansk province (which borders Russia) is in Ukrainian, and the website's sentiments are distinctly anti-Yanukovych. The countryside and smaller towns of both provinces tend to speak Ukrainian and practice Ukrainian culture. And even in the cities themselves, the vast majority of the population -- minus the pro-Russian chauvinists -- will happily engage Ukrainian speakers in conversation. One Ukrainian history professor at Donetsk State University has been conducting all his lectures in Ukrainian for over a decade. At first some students grumbled -- and he responded by pointing out that if they lack the intellectual ability to understand Ukrainian, they shouldn't be university students. Since then, there have been no complaints and no problems.Go to Lviv in the West, and you encounter similar subtleties. The vast majority of Lviv residents are at least proficient in Russian, gladly speak the language, read Russian newspapers and books, and watch Russian television. If a radio is playing in a restaurant or café, chances are as high that it'll be tuned to a Russian station rather than a Ukrainian one. Lviv is especially popular with Russian tourists, who like it for its Middle European feel, old architecture, and Ukrainian distinctiveness. A favorite Russian watering hole is the Kryyivka (Bunker) restaurant, modeled after the underground hideouts used by anti-Soviet Ukrainian nationalists after World War II.
Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

The Severity of California's Terrible Drought, in One Image

The Severity of California's Terrible Drought, in One Image | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“After months of extremely dry weather, a Sacramento-area lake has pulled a massive disappearing act.”California just suffered its driest year in 119 years, and the horrid drought that's plaguing the state (and much of the American West) still shows no sign of relaxing its withering grip. But how bad is it, really?Well, it's so dry that "grass-fed beef" is becoming "grain-fed beef," as ranchers can't find any grass to feed their cattle. Things are so parched that the state's municipal water system has announced it can't get water to many farmers. That's a first in its 54-year history, and not a good omen for the state that produces half of America's vegetables and fruits.
Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Human Imprint

The Human Imprint | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“A Human Geography Resource; Especially for Teachers”The Human Imprint is home to everything Human Geography related for the student, educator, and the every day Joe/Jane. This site includes geographic related stories, lesson plans, and other links that bring us closer to understanding the “why of where.”
Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How much is time wrong around the world?

How much is time wrong around the world? | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“Why Spaniards have dinner so late? A map of the difference between solar time and clock time around the world.”I edited a world map from Wikipedia to show the difference between solar and standard time. It turns out, there are many places where the sun rises and sets late in the day, like in Spain, but not a lot where it is very early (highlighted in red and green in the map, respectively). Most of Russia is heavily red, but mostly in zones with very scarce population; the exception is St. Petersburg, with a discrepancy of two hours, but the effect on time is mitigated by the high latitude. The most extreme example of Spain-like time is western China: the difference reaches three hours against solar time. For example, today the sun rises there at 10:15 and sets at 19:45, and solar noon is at 15:01.
Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Food issues
Scoop.it!

The Environmental Impact Of Your Hamburger (INFOGRAPHIC)

The Environmental Impact Of Your Hamburger (INFOGRAPHIC) | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“ Think your car is the only thing that consumes fossil fuels on a daily basis? Guess again.”
Via Cathryn Wellner
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Why Koreans are killing themselves in droves

Why Koreans are killing themselves in droves | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“ A recent pair of dramatic suicides alarms the upwardly mobile nation. (South Koreans are killing themselves in droves, alarming the upwardly mobile nation.”
Via Mr. David Burton, Dustin Fowler
Greg Hill's insight:
Is this a residual affect for Newly Industrialized Countries? What about Developed countries moving into the Service age?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Cultures, Identity and Constructs
Scoop.it!

Which Place Is More Sexist, The Middle East Or Latin America?

“ NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro has lived and worked in both regions and says there's plenty of sexism to go around, though it comes in different forms.”
Via Middle East Prospects Forum
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Trinity River Basin
Scoop.it!

West’s Drought and Growth Intensify Conflict Over Water Rights

West’s Drought and Growth Intensify Conflict Over Water Rights | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“ Amid the long drought, conflicts over water are intensifying in the arid West, and the explosive growth of cities is also raising the stakes for farmers and industry.”
Via Trinity Waters
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from AP Human Geography Herm
Scoop.it!

Pro-Russian separatists: Crimea is just the beginning - video

“ On the day of the Crimean referendum, Guardian correspondent Shaun Walker and filmmaker Antony Butts travelled to Sevastopol, bastion of pro-Russian separatism”
Via Allison Anthony
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

World's Most Dangerous Job - Human Planet - BBC - YouTube

“ On the Indonesian island of Java, men mine sulphur from inside Ljen Volcano. It's crater is filled with a mix of highly toxic gases, that have claimed the li...”
Via Matt Richardson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from AP Human GeographyNRHS
Scoop.it!

Video: In China, a Staggering Migration

“ The Chinese government plans to move 250 million people from farms to cities over the next 12 to 15 years.”
Via Mrs.Dias, Karen Moles Rose
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from AP Human Geography Resources
Scoop.it!

Battling Blight: Detroit Maps Entire City To Find Bad Buildings

Battling Blight: Detroit Maps Entire City To Find Bad Buildings | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“ The city has a lot of abandoned buildings, and to decide which ones should be demolished, the federal government and some major foundations started a massive, high-tech mapping project. The new mayor says that's just what he needs to improve the neighborhoods.”
Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Crimea Plans Referendum on Joining Russia, as Obama Levies Sanctions

Crimea Plans Referendum on Joining Russia, as Obama Levies Sanctions | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
“ Crimean members of Parliament have voted to secede from Ukraine and join Russia, taking the very step Ukraine's interim government has been fearing since tensions arose in the region. ”
Via Allison Anthony, Dustin Fowler
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

Russia's Invasion of Crimea Is So Shocking Because it's a Return to a Now Rare Form of Warfare

Russia's Invasion of Crimea Is So Shocking Because it's a Return to a Now Rare Form of Warfare | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
It seems like one reason why Russia’s actions in Crimea appear so jarring and brazen is that it’s a form of warfare that was once common but rarely take place anymore. Russia may not formally annex Crimea – it seems more likely that the territory will declare independence under heavy Russian influence – but it has essentially invaded another country to lob off a piece of territory that was, despite longstanding nationalist sentiment, an undisputed part of Ukraine.
Historically speaking, conflicts in which one country sends troops into the territory to take over a disputed region are pretty common. But today, interstate war is relatively rare, and interstate wars over control of territory even rarer. For the most part, conflicts today usually take place between armed groups within states, and when one country does send troops into another – the U.S. in Iraq and Afghanistan, for instance – it’s generally under the assumption that sooner or later they will pull out, leaving borders as they are.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

If you think Kansas is the flattest U.S. state, you’re plain wrong

If you think Kansas is the flattest U.S. state, you’re plain wrong | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
It’s time for some levelheaded talk about that ostensibly endless stretch of flatness some denigrate as “flyover country” and others respectfully call 'Kansas.' The alleged monotony of the Sunflower State’s terrain is referenced about as often as “The Wizard of Oz” when Kansas pops up into conversation. “It’s truly engrained,” said Jerry Dobson, professor of geography at the University of Kansas. “Every Kansan hears again and again, when new visitors arrive, ‘I’m surprised. This place is not as flat as I expected.’By any measure, Florida takes the prize for the flattest state in the nation becuase the highest point in the state is only 345 feet above sea level. Then Illinois, North Dakota, Louisiana, Minnesota and Delaware follow. Kansas merely ranks seventh in flatness.
Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.
Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greg Hill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Crisis in the Crimea: The Showdown Between Ukraine and Russia

Crisis in the Crimea: The Showdown Between Ukraine and Russia | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.