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AP Human Geography
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Rescooped by Greg Hill from AP Human Geography Resources

U.S. Religion Map and Religious Populations

U.S. Religion Map and Religious Populations | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
The Pew U.S. Religious Landscape Study religion map diagrams which religions have the highest populations in each state.

Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
Hye-Hyun Kang's curator insight, January 10, 2014 12:13 AM

This shows how different religions have affected different states in the U.S. This affects certain areas in the states and their culture. 

Rishi Suresh's curator insight, January 16, 2014 12:36 PM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the distribution of religions on a national scale. It also  highlights the dominance of Christianity and Protestantism in the US.


Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to key issue 1 because it shows the prevalence of christianity, a universalizing religion, in the US.


Vinay Penmetsa: This relates with the section, showing how Christianity is an universalizing religion, and its distribution in America.


Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the distribution and density of Protestants in the U.S. This map shows that the highest density of Protestants occur oin the South-Eastern region of the U.S.


Rishi Suresh: This relates to the distribution of denominations within America. It shows how the distribution is related to the patterns left by the original settlers. 

Miles Gibson's curator insight, December 26, 2014 12:00 AM

Unit 3 culture
This diagram shows the percentage of adults by region to their corresponding religions. This demographic is part of America's major parts in its own branches. It shows highly developed religions like christianity and lower developed ones like Buddhism. This is an informative demographic.

This demographic relates to unit 3 because it shows how religions develop in different areas over time and pressures individual movements. It shows group organization throughout the u.s. and this is a cultural aspect of unit 3 that is very well touched upon. It is an overall demonstration of unit 3

Rescooped by Greg Hill from Geography Education

Pacific Islanders transform Utah’s football scene

Pacific Islanders transform Utah’s football scene | Horn APHuG | Scoop.it
New demographic study in California reveals nation’s changing face. Plus how Pacific Islanders changed high school football in Utah and why a Somali Bantu band from Vermont is in demand around the country.

Via Seth Dixon
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 6:30 PM

Pacific islanders transform the Utah football team. Yes, that's right now football has a more diverse team roster and they said they are going to keep on expanding to receive top players from these countries and states in order to build a new kind of diverse team. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 10:06 PM

Going to school in another place is a great experience. For these pacific islanders they get the chance to get an education in the U.S. while playing a game they love. Utah was the first of many states to start this trend and now other states are trying to do the same.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 26, 4:28 PM

This article shows how ethnic groups who come the US adopt the culture of the country in their own unique way.  Polynesians are known for being great at football due to their size, and some even make it into the NFL.  However, the reason many Pacific Islanders come to the US is for better opportunity and education than they would have had at home.  It is interesting to see how the face of a sport can change, and how some ethnic groups who come to the nation are drawn towards certain sports.  Whereas Dominicans love Baseball, Pacific Islanders love Football.  In fact, Troy Palamalu, who just retired from the Steelers during the offseason has Polynesian heritage and he was a great football player in his prime.  The inclusion of the haka into football games out west,  as noted by Professor Dixon, is also interesting due to the fact that parts of Polynesian culture are becoming part of American sport culture as well.