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A World Without Work

A World Without Work | Conversations | Scoop.it
For centuries, experts have predicted that machines would make workers obsolete. That moment may finally be arriving. Could that be a good thing?
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This is why Finland has the best schools

This is why Finland has the best schools | Conversations | Scoop.it
The Harvard education professor Howard Gardner once advised Americans, "Learn from Finland, which has the most effective schools and which does just abou
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Study: Poverty Influences Children’s Early Brain Development

Study: Poverty Influences Children’s Early Brain Development | Conversations | Scoop.it
A new study links poverty with slower early brain development. According to the study, children of low-income families have slower rates of growth in a number of areas, including two key parts of the brain.

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Davina De Laure's curator insight, January 26, 2014 8:29 AM

this is my insight

i was shock to find out how poverty influences children's early brian development. This is because environmental factors that contribute to slower brain development often come with poverty, such as poor nutrition, a lack of sleep, an unsafe environment, and a lack of books and educational toys.i think that the goverment should do something about this issuse so that every child would have a equally head start in life. seeing child suffering due to lack of resorces makes me think that i should be lucky to have a place to study and have a family that is well to do and also have books to study and we can also make a differance for this children by donating books that we have used instead of throwing it donating money clothes etc

Ann Tan's comment, February 3, 2014 12:18 AM
After reading this article, I think that the main factor which is hindering the children living in poverty is the environment they lived in.Children living in poverty lacked resources such as writing materials and books. Children do not have the basic materials a normal child needs. Children living in poverty have lack of nutrition, a shortage of sleep, an unsafe environment and a lack of books which results in a slower brain developmentParents could not afford to send their kids to school. Also, parents living in poverty are not highly educated too, hence, parents would be the greatest influence to children at the young age. I think that the government should set up free school for children living in poverty or poverty would be passed down from generations to generations with no education as it is very important. After reading this article, I think we should all be grateful and cherish what we have and how fortunate we are to have education.
Brandy Scaggs's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:56 AM

Linking poverty with slow early grown brain development.

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No nonsense nonfiction: Tips for incorporating nonfiction into the ELA curriculum

No nonsense nonfiction: Tips for incorporating nonfiction into the ELA curriculum | Conversations | Scoop.it
Many school districts are going through a painstaking process of writing new curricula to meet the Common Core State Standards. One of the biggest changes

Via Mel Riddile
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J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, December 31, 2013 11:14 AM

@PaulineZd  has good, practical insight that K-6 and secondary Enlish teachers need to increase their use of non-fiction texts.

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, January 6, 2014 6:36 PM

Short and practical ideas. But, remember that when the Common Core cites informational text as important, that means much more than reading narrative nonfiction. I find the use of the term "nonfiction novels" more than problematic. Call a book by its genre: generating an oxymoron is officious.

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"Readability measures do a great job of predicting reading comprehension, but they provide lousy writing guidance."

"Readability measures do a great job of predicting reading comprehension, but they provide lousy writing guidance." | Conversations | Scoop.it

By Tim Shanahan

 

Everyone knows Grapes of Wrath is harder to read than predicted. But for every book with a hinky readability score many others are placed just right. These formulas certainly are not perfect, but they are easy to use and they make more accurate guesses than we can without them. 
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Developing Cognitive Competence: Learning the Skills of Argument

Developing Cognitive Competence: Learning the Skills of Argument | Conversations | Scoop.it
Developing Cognitive Competence: Learning the Skills of Argument
Huffington Post
...

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A Dialogue With Patrick Honner on Rigor

A Dialogue With Patrick Honner on Rigor | Conversations | Scoop.it
A Conversation About Rigor  — Part 1 This is the first post in a dialogue between Patrick Honner and me concerning rigor, testing, and the new Common Core Math Standards.  Each installment in this ...
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Socratic Seminars in the Middle

Socratic Seminars in the Middle | Conversations | Scoop.it
Learn how Socratic Seminars can help students develop effective habits of discussion, explain their ideas, and support them with evidence. (Our author @SarahTantillo discusses how to stage a Socratic Seminar - from #theliterarycookbook!

Via Charles Fischer
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Charles Fischer's curator insight, July 31, 2013 5:35 AM

There are many different ways to run Socratic Seminars...this is one way using the concentric circles model with an outer observer circle and an inner talking circle. However, it's important to understand that there are other similar ways to create quality dialogue in the classroom. Students need time to practice their skills, especially talking and forming their ideas, so choose the system that gives them the most time to practice.

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Leadership in the Age of Complexity, from Hero to Host | Margaret
 Wheatley with 
Debbie
 Frieze


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Classrooms That Work: They Can All Read and Write (3rd Edition) book download

Richard L. Allington


Download here http://baommse.info/1/books/Classrooms-That-Work--They-Can-All-Read-and-Write--3r...

Classrooms That Work: They Can All Read and Write (3rd Edition) book download<br/><br/>Richard L. Allington<br/><br/><br/>Download here http://baommse.info/1/books/Classrooms-That-Work--They-Can-All-Read-and-Write--3r... | Conversations | Scoop.it
Classrooms That Work: They Can All Read and Write (3rd Edition) book download

Richard L. Allington

Downloa http://t.co/XfUQ62cVmr
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Diane Ravitch’s Blog: Now the Gates Foundation Is Destroying Higher Education

Diane Ravitch’s Blog: Now the Gates Foundation Is Destroying Higher Education | Conversations | Scoop.it
With $36 billion, the Gates Foundation has too much money, too much power, and not enough common sense nor willingness to listen to those who warn that they are doing harm to basic social institutions (Diane Ravitch Now the Gates Foundation Is Destroying...
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How Annotation Reshapes Student Reading

How Annotation Reshapes Student Reading | Conversations | Scoop.it
How Annotation Reshapes Student Reading

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lbligen's curator insight, August 4, 2013 1:45 PM

Every teacher should enhance their student's reading comprehension by using  annotations as a record of their thinking. If you’re thinking, make a record of it by writing down.

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Reading Today April/May 2013

Reading Today April/May 2013 | Conversations | Scoop.it
Reading Today April/May 2013 (Another great article from Richard Allington. http://t.co/mZjGriltq7)
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Do schools kill creativity?

Do schools kill creativity? | Conversations | Scoop.it
Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.
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"The ultimate goal of the classroom is the link between improved thinking skills and problem solving"

"The ultimate goal of the classroom is the link between improved thinking skills and problem solving" | Conversations | Scoop.it

The Common Core States Standards (CCSS) are a positive step. They place a major emphasis on real world applications in education. These connections must be constantly reinforced in the classroom. That cannot, however, always be accomplished with games or videos. Instead, it requires teachers that understand that the ultimate goal of the classroom is the link between improved thinking skills and problem solving regardless of the particular curriculum.

 
Via Mel Riddile
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Karine Thonnard's curator insight, January 8, 2014 8:26 AM

add your insight...

 
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Diane Ravitch and the Angry Rebellion against Common Core

Diane Ravitch and the Angry Rebellion against Common Core | Conversations | Scoop.it
Wielding her influential blog as a weapon, this 75-year-old activist has created a powerful network united by revulsion against top-down, elite policymaking.

Via RJ Lavallee
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RJ Lavallee's curator insight, December 17, 2013 10:36 AM

Dig Diane. Don't dig the divisiveness she's exacerbating today.

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final exams vs. projects – nope, false dichotomy: a practical start to the blog year

final exams vs. projects – nope, false dichotomy: a practical start to the blog year | Conversations | Scoop.it
Let’s begin the new year with a nuts and bolts educational issue. (My New Year’s Resolution is to say less about hot-button political issues and make fewer needless enemies…). In this post I consider the place of final exams.
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Shanahan on Literacy: To Multi-Text Or Not to Multi-Text in Close Reading

Shanahan on Literacy: To Multi-Text Or Not to Multi-Text in Close Reading | Conversations | Scoop.it
Shanahan on Literacy: To Multi-Text Or Not to Multi-Text in Close Reading - http://t.co/4ARJVsGAXU #CCSS #ccchat #engchat #elemchat

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ETS Report Warns of Child Poverty and its Consequences

ETS Report Warns of Child Poverty and its Consequences | Conversations | Scoop.it
ETS Report Warns of Child Poverty and its Consequences
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10,000

10,000 | Conversations | Scoop.it
I awoke this morning to find that I have 10,005 followers on Twitter. In the grand scheme of things that fact isn’t worth a wet paper towel but I confess it gave me a little thrill. Ten thousand – a big number.
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Promoting Social Mobility | Boston Review

Promoting Social Mobility | Boston Review | Conversations | Scoop.it
Promoting Social Mobility | Boston Review http://t.co/ManaFfq54y // Mira @paulosfera :)
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CCSS: Write More - Grade Less - by Mike Schmoker

School and District Improvement, Assessment, Curriculum and Staff Development Consultation (Worried about grading all the writing called for in CCSS?


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