Homo Numericus Bis
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Homo Numericus Bis
humanités numériques
Curated by Mlik Sahib
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What Will Happen to ‘#BigData’ In Education? | #learning #analytics

What Will Happen to ‘#BigData’ In Education? | #learning #analytics | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it
Privacy concerns have put the breaks on many efforts to use "big data" in education. Why are people so skittish of education data when other kinds of digital information are readily accessible?

Via Claude Emond, Pierre Levy, luiy
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luiy's curator insight, April 15, 2014 7:50 PM

InBloom’s trajectory has shined a spotlight on the public’s sensitivity around what happens to student data. When it first began as a mammoth ed-tech project in 2011 by the Council of Chief State School Officers, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation called the Shared Learning Infrastructure, the purpose was to provide open-source software to safely organize, pool, and store student data from multiple states and multiple sources in the cloud. That included everything from demographics to attendance to discipline to grades to the detailed, moment-by-moment, data produced by learning analytics programs like Dreambox and Khan Academy. An API — application programming interface — would allow software developers to connect to that data, creating applications that could, at least in theory, be used by any school in the infrastructure.

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#Algorithms are watching I #privacy

#Algorithms are watching I #privacy | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it
In his prescient novel '1984,' English author George Orwell predicted a future that bears an uncanny resemblance to current reality—except for a simple twist.

Via luiy
Mlik Sahib's insight:

Eli Pariser, co-founder of the Internet news site Upworthy, coined the term "filter bubble" to describe how invisible algorithmic editing selectively guesses the information that users would like to see based on their past click behavior, search history and location. The results, however, can be quite one-sided. "There's a sense of being placed in this echo chamber - a term people use a lot," Zhao said. "Whatever you already believe, whatever you already like tends to get reflected back at you. If you're a hardcore liberal Democrat, for instance, Google shows you news from blue-leaning states. If you're a conservative Republican, then you get everything that's slanted that way."

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luiy's curator insight, December 9, 2013 4:56 PM

As algorithms become more sophisticated, their influence over our lives increases exponentially. "Much of what we see today is customized for us because of all the data tracking done by Google and Facebook," Zhao said. "They customize everything for you because of what you've already done." He and other researchers are trying to understand just how much this impacts us and to what extent data tracking influences what we see on a daily basis.

 

Eli Pariser, co-founder of the Internet news site Upworthy, coined the term "filter bubble" to describe how invisible algorithmic editing selectively guesses the information that users would like to see based on their past click behavior, search history and location. The results, however, can be quite one-sided. "There's a sense of being placed in this echo chamber - a term people use a lot," Zhao said. "Whatever you already believe, whatever you already like tends to get reflected back at you. If you're a hardcore liberal Democrat, for instance, Google shows you news from blue-leaning states. If you're a conservative Republican, then you get everything that's slanted that way."



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-12-algorithms.html#jCp

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The diaspora* Project | #socialmedia #opendata #privacy

The diaspora* Project | #socialmedia #opendata #privacy | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it

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luiy's curator insight, November 3, 2013 7:54 AM

Decentralization

Instead of everyone’s data being contained on huge central servers owned by a large organization, local servers (“pods”) can be set up anywhere in the world. You choose which pod to register with - perhaps your local pod - and seamlessly connect with the diaspora* community worldwide.

 

Freedom

You can be whoever you want to be in diaspora*. Unlike some networks, you don’t have to use your real identity. You can interact with whomever you choose in whatever way you want. The only limit is your imagination. diaspora* is also Free Software, giving you liberty to use it as you wish.

 

Privacy

In diaspora* you own your data. You do not sign over any rights to a corporation or other interest who could use it. With diaspora*, your friends, your habits, and your content is your business ... not ours! In addition, you choose who sees what you share, using Aspects.

 

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What is Personal Data and How Much Personal Data Exists? | MIT Technology Review

What is Personal Data and How Much Personal Data Exists? | MIT Technology Review | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it
As digital data expands, anonymity may become a mathematical impossibility.

Via Pierre Levy
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Governments, The Web and Surveillance

Governments, The Web and Surveillance | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it
When the web became commonplace, the decision-makers ignored it, considering it irrelevant. As a result, freedom flourished online. People weren't just consuming content; they were creating it.

But, eventually, politicians and leaders realised how important the internet is. And they realised how useful the internet can be for other purposes — especially for surveillance of citizens. The two chief inventions of our generation — the internet and the mobile phone — changed the world. However, they both turned out to be perfect tools for the surveillance state. And in such a state, everybody is assumed guilty.

US intelligence agencies have a full legal right to monitor foreigners — and most of us are foreigners to the Americans. So when we use US-based services, we are under surveillance — and most of the services we use are US-based.

Advancements in computing power and data storage have made wholesale surveillance possible. But they've also made leaking possible, which will keep organisations worrying about getting caught over any wrongdoing. The future of the web is hanging in the balance between parties that want to keep us under surveillance and parties that want to reveal the nature of such surveillance. Both parties have the data revolution on their side.

While governments are watching over us, they know we're watching over them.

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 13, 2014 6:53 PM


Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=ANT

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Privacy

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=NSA

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet?tag=Infographic

 

Looks like George ORWELL was right...

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Brother_(Nineteen_Eighty-Four)

 

Forget PRISM, the recent NSA leaks are plain: Digital privacy doesn’t exist...


Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, March 13, 2014 8:12 PM

More complete information on the post we made here on http://www.scoop.it/t/internet-presence about agencies like the NSA spying through your webcam.


Also, check Gust Mees's insight in the comments with more articles and information. Thanks Gust.

Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, March 13, 2014 8:24 PM

More complete information on the post we made here on http://www.scoop.it/t/internet-presence about agencies like the NSA spying through your webcam.


Also, check Gust Mees's insight in the comments with more articles and information. Thanks Gust.

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Inventor of world wide web criticises NSA over privacy breaches

Inventor of world wide web criticises NSA over privacy breaches | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it
Sir Tim Berners-Lee says NSA has weakened online security

 

 

 

 

 

===> It's naïve to imagine that if you introduce a weakness into a system you will be the only one to use it." <===

 

As well as the dangers of exposing private data to hacker gangs and hostile states, cracking encryptions was also unethical, he said.


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 7, 2013 7:15 PM

 

===> It's naïve to imagine that if you introduce a weakness into a system you will be the only one to use it." <===

 

As well as the dangers of exposing private data to hacker gangs and hostile states, cracking encryptions was also unethical, he said.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=PRISM

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Cyberespionage...

 

 

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Cyber Arms Race: Mikko Hypponen at TEDxBrussels

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TED...

Via Gust MEES
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