Homo Numericus Bis
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Homo Numericus Bis
humanités numériques
Curated by Mlik Sahib
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Facebook In Talks To Acquire Drone Maker Titan Aerospace | TechCrunch

Facebook In Talks To Acquire Drone Maker Titan Aerospace | TechCrunch | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it
Facebook, one of the primary backers of the Internet.org initiative, which aims to bring affordable Internet access to the 5 billion people in the world who..

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En quoi l’internet est-il un progrès ? « InternetActu.net

En quoi l’internet est-il un progrès ? « InternetActu.net | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it

InternetActu.net est un site d'actualité consacré aux enjeux de l'internet, aux usages innovants qu'il permet et aux recherches qui en découlent.

 

"Elargir l’accès à l’internet, le rendre abordable pour tous est assurément une initiative louable. C’est en tout cas celle que vient de lancer Internet.org, une coalition d’acteurs de l’internet où l’on trouve Facebook, Samsung, Ericsson, Nokia, Opera, Qualcomm et Mediatek. Le but initial de cette association a été clairement annoncé par Mark Zuckerberg lui-même via communiqué de presse (.pdf) (clamant : “la connectivité est-elle un droit de l’homme ?”) et article dans le New York Times : “réduire le coût de la fourniture de services internet mobile à 1% de leur niveau actuel dans les 5 à 10 ans à venir en améliorant l’efficacité du réseau et les logiciels de téléphonie mobile”. L’objectif est clair : offrir un accès internet aux deux tiers de l’humanité qui ne sont pas encore connectés au réseau. Connecter la planète, rien de moins [...]"

 

Lire la suite : http://www.internetactu.net/2013/09/10/en-quoi-linternet-est-il-un-progres/


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Paul Butler – Visualizing Facebook Friends: #EyeCandy in #R I #dataviz

Paul Butler – Visualizing Facebook Friends: #EyeCandy in #R I #dataviz | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it

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luiy's curator insight, January 4, 12:25 PM

I’ve received a lot comments about the image, many asking for more details on how I created it. When I tell people I used R, the reaction I get is roughly what I would expect if I told them I made it with Microsoft Paintand a bottle of Jägermeister. Some people even questioned whether it was actually done in R. The truth is, aside from the addition of the logo and date text, the image was produced entirely with about 150 lines of R code with no external dependencies. In the process I learned a few things about creating nice-looking graphs in R.

 

Transparency and Faking It

My first attempt at plotting the data involved plotting very transparent lines. Unfortunately there was just too much data to get a meaningful plot — even at very low opacity, there were enough lines to make the entire image just a bright blob. When I increased the transparency more, the opacity was rounded down to zero by my graphics device and the result was that nothing was drawn.

The solution was to manipulate the drawing order of the lines. I used a simple loop over my data to draw the lines, so it was easy to control which lines are drawn first using order(). I created an ordering based on the length of the lines, so that longer lines were drawn “behind” the shorter, more local lines. Then I used colorRampPalette() to generate a color palette from black to blue to white, and colored the lines according to order they were drawn.

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Mark Zuckerberg on Facebook Home, Money, and the Future of Communication | Wired.com

Mark Zuckerberg on Facebook Home, Money, and the Future of Communication | Wired.com | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it
Photograph by Platon FACEBOOK Mark Zuckerberg on Facebook Home, Money, and the Future of Communication As caretaker of a service with a bill

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Pierre Levy's curator insight, April 5, 2013 10:53 AM

But sharing can be exhausting. You hear about people taking “Facebook vacations.” It’s an interesting phenomenon. We have two ways to turn off Facebook: deactivate and delete. The group who chooses to turn Facebook off permanently is relatively small, but there’s a larger set of people who will deactivate their account for a day or two because they want to focus and study for a test—it’s the equivalent of locking yourself in the library. It’s actually a very popular feature.

luiy's curator insight, April 5, 2013 12:59 PM
But sharing can be exhausting. You hear about people taking “Facebook vacations.” It’s an interesting phenomenon. We have two ways to turn off Facebook: deactivate and delete. The group who chooses to turn Facebook off permanently is relatively small, but there’s a larger set of people who will deactivate their account for a day or two because they want to focus and study for a test—it’s the equivalent of locking yourself in the library. It’s actually a very popular feature. Did you ever take a Facebook vacation? I don’t think I ever have. I certainly turn off my phone from time to time. Changes made to Facebook used to reliably draw outrage, especially over privacy concerns. But when you announced Graph Search, which allows users to find more personal information shared by their friends, there wasn’t much of an outcry. What have you learned? One of the things we did a lot better this time is we talked to a lot of folks to understand the concerns of organizations and others. Typically we have an iterative approach, but here we felt, in terms of privacy, everything had to be there at the beginning. The project was actually ready to go in December, but we took an extra month to build more privacy tools. You say Facebook follows “the Hacker Way.” How is it core to what happens here? It really is our philosophy for how we build stuff. There are a bunch of companies that try to make every release perfect, and Apple is the best at that. That’s wonderful, but there’s another way of doing things that’s potentially even better over the long term—allow yourself room to experiment and don’t try to make each individual release as polished as possible. You’re not yet 30 and you’ve begun to make some significant charitable contributions. What’s your thinking on this? Bill Gates offered me some advice: Don’t just give your money away—it’s something that requires practice to get good at. So why wait? Clearly I have a day job that takes up 99 percent of my time, so I can’t be running a foundation. But I can take a venture capital approach, where you invest in people. I made the investment in Newark schools because I really believed in the governor and mayor over there, and they’ve delivered.
Lorena Betta's curator insight, April 7, 2013 9:04 AM

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