Homo Agilis (Coll...
Follow
Find tag "learning"
12.2K views | +9 today
Homo Agilis (Collective Intelligence, Agility and Sustainability : The Future is already here)
For and about all those people working to build together a sustainable world through collective intelligence and agility. Knowledge to share and collective behaviours to adopt to build and foster a sustainable future for all of us.
«The future is already here – it's just not evenly distributed»
William Gibson, who invented the word «Cyberspace»
Curated by Claude Emond
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Claude Emond from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

The Globalization Capability Gap: Execution, Not Strategy, Separates Leaders from Laggards

The Globalization Capability Gap: Execution, Not Strategy, Separates Leaders from Laggards | Homo Agilis (Collective Intelligence, Agility and Sustainability : The Future is already here) | Scoop.it

Over the past few decades, the rise of emerging markets—initially as sources of cheap labor and then as rapidly growing consumer markets and centers of capital investment and innovation—has caused most companies of size and stature to enlarge their global ambitions. But despite this concerted push to globalize, few companies are ready to build and run truly global organizations and operations.

  • Only about 10 percent of companies believe they have the full complement of capabilities required to win overseas. Most companies are barely mastering the basics.
  • A smart strategy is necessary but insufficient. The winners in globalization also execute better than their competitors.
  • Companies struggle with three specific areas overseas: strengthening their go-to-market, logistics, and other value-chain activities; aligning their organization to support the global agenda through, for example, the spread of best practices; and mastering mergers and acquisitions.
  • Line managers who run businesses or regions are much more pessimistic about their companies’ global readiness than headquarters staff.
  • Midsize companies are at the greatest risk in going global. They are less nimble than smaller companies and do not have the scale or systems of larger ones.

Those are the primary messages of the Global Readiness Survey, which was conducted jointly by BCG and IMD business school. (For details on our methodology, see the sidebar “What We Asked, Whom We Surveyed, How We Scored.”) In this report, we explore our findings and take a detailed look at what separates the leaders from the laggards in globalization.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Claude Emond's insight:

Filling the gap in a VUCA world requires decisive flexible actions. You do not transform through strategy, you transform through collective actions

more...
Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 16, 6:52 PM

Despite high aspirations, few companies are ready to build and run truly global organizations and operations.

aambal's curator insight, July 18, 1:58 AM

http://aambal.in/
Advertising Design Studio, Advertising Agencies in Chennai,Web
Aambal Design Studio Chennai Creative Ad Agency Branding Solutions, Advertising Agencies in Chennai, Impressive Advertisement Designs, Website Designs, SEO,SMO

Tatiana Lyons's curator insight, July 21, 10:31 AM
"A smart strategy is necessary but insufficient. The winners in globalization also execute better than their competitors."
Rescooped by Claude Emond from Thriving in the Project Age
Scoop.it!

Learning for a #Change | The 10 #Challenges of Change

Learning for a #Change | The 10 #Challenges of Change | Homo Agilis (Collective Intelligence, Agility and Sustainability : The Future is already here) | Scoop.it
Ten years ago, Peter Senge introduced the idea of the learning organization. Now he says that for big companies to change, we need to stop thinking...

Via luiy, Claude Emond
more...
luiy's curator insight, February 11, 2014 8:33 AM

Sidebar: The 10 Challenges of Change

 

In "The Dance of Change: The Challenges to Sustaining Momentum in Learning Organizations," Peter Senge and his colleagues identify 10 challenges of change. Grouped into three categories -- challenges of initiating change, challenges of sustaining momentum, and challenges of systemwide redesign and rethinking -- these 10 items amount to what the authors call "the conditions of the environment that regulate growth."

 

 

CHALLENGES OF INITIATING CHANGE

 

"We don't have time for this stuff!" People who are involved in a pilot group to initiate a change effort need enough control over their schedules to give their work the time that it needs.

 

"We have no help!" Members of a pilot group need enough support, coaching, and resources to be able to learn and to do their work effectively.

 

"This stuff isn't relevant." There need to be people who can make the case for change -- who can connect the development of new skills to the real work of the business.

 

"They're not walking the talk!" A critical test for any change effort: the correlation between espoused values and actual behavior.

 

 

CHALLENGES OF SUSTAINING MOMENTUM

 

"This stuff is . . ." Personal fear and anxiety -- concerns about vulnerability and inadequacy -- lead members of a pilot group to question a change effort.

 

"This stuff isn't working!" Change efforts run into measurement problems: Early results don't meet expectations, or traditional metrics don't calibrate to a pilot group's efforts.

 

"They're acting like a cult!" A pilot group falls prey to arrogance, dividing the company into "believers" and "nonbelievers."

 

 

CHALLENGES OF SYSTEMWIDE REDESIGN AND RETHINKING

 

"They . . . never let us do this stuff." The pilot group wants more autonomy; "the powers that be" don't want to lose control.

 

"We keep reinventing the wheel." Instead of building on previous successes, each group finds that it has to start from scratch.

 

"Where are we going?" The larger strategy and purpose of a change effort may be obscured by day-to-day activity. Big question: Can the organization achieve a new definition of success?