Homo Agilis (Collective Intelligence, Agility and Sustainability : The Future is already here)
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Homo Agilis (Collective Intelligence, Agility and Sustainability : The Future is already here)
For and about all those people working to build together a sustainable world through collective intelligence and agility. Knowledge to share and collective behaviours to adopt to build and foster a sustainable future for all of us.
«The future is already here – it's just not evenly distributed»
William Gibson, who invented the word «Cyberspace»
Curated by Claude Emond
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Rescooped by Claude Emond from Thriving or Dying in the Project Age
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Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling

Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling | Homo Agilis (Collective Intelligence, Agility and Sustainability : The Future is already here) | Scoop.it
“What I’ve seen is a leader doesn’t start with storytelling, they start with story listening.” -John Maeda, Design Partner, KPCB During the past two years, B2C as well as B2B marketing leader…

Via Karen Dietz, Claude Emond
Claude Emond's insight:

Listening, the lost skill without which collaboration and real progress are impossible. I just realize that all the things I propose now (on engagement, change management, changeboxing, agile, etc.), all are based on listening first, something I have myself to  learn to do better. Let's listen to each other in order to lead better together for change

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Zeb WATURUOCHA, PhD's curator insight, October 31, 2014 1:00 AM

It is true that if you don't listen to me, I will not listen to you though I might pretend to be listening because you are my boss.

Raymond Godding's curator insight, October 31, 2014 4:01 PM

Leiders die beweging tot stand willen brengen, beginnen met luisteren voordat ze gaan vertellen. 

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Learning for a #Change | The 10 #Challenges of Change

Learning for a #Change | The 10 #Challenges of Change | Homo Agilis (Collective Intelligence, Agility and Sustainability : The Future is already here) | Scoop.it
Ten years ago, Peter Senge introduced the idea of the learning organization. Now he says that for big companies to change, we need to stop thinking...

Via luiy, Claude Emond
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luiy's curator insight, February 11, 2014 8:33 AM

Sidebar: The 10 Challenges of Change

 

In "The Dance of Change: The Challenges to Sustaining Momentum in Learning Organizations," Peter Senge and his colleagues identify 10 challenges of change. Grouped into three categories -- challenges of initiating change, challenges of sustaining momentum, and challenges of systemwide redesign and rethinking -- these 10 items amount to what the authors call "the conditions of the environment that regulate growth."

 

 

CHALLENGES OF INITIATING CHANGE

 

"We don't have time for this stuff!" People who are involved in a pilot group to initiate a change effort need enough control over their schedules to give their work the time that it needs.

 

"We have no help!" Members of a pilot group need enough support, coaching, and resources to be able to learn and to do their work effectively.

 

"This stuff isn't relevant." There need to be people who can make the case for change -- who can connect the development of new skills to the real work of the business.

 

"They're not walking the talk!" A critical test for any change effort: the correlation between espoused values and actual behavior.

 

 

CHALLENGES OF SUSTAINING MOMENTUM

 

"This stuff is . . ." Personal fear and anxiety -- concerns about vulnerability and inadequacy -- lead members of a pilot group to question a change effort.

 

"This stuff isn't working!" Change efforts run into measurement problems: Early results don't meet expectations, or traditional metrics don't calibrate to a pilot group's efforts.

 

"They're acting like a cult!" A pilot group falls prey to arrogance, dividing the company into "believers" and "nonbelievers."

 

 

CHALLENGES OF SYSTEMWIDE REDESIGN AND RETHINKING

 

"They . . . never let us do this stuff." The pilot group wants more autonomy; "the powers that be" don't want to lose control.

 

"We keep reinventing the wheel." Instead of building on previous successes, each group finds that it has to start from scratch.

 

"Where are we going?" The larger strategy and purpose of a change effort may be obscured by day-to-day activity. Big question: Can the organization achieve a new definition of success?

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Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results

Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results | Homo Agilis (Collective Intelligence, Agility and Sustainability : The Future is already here) | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche features Chee Chin Liew’s presentation on moving from hierarchies to teams at BASF.  It shows how IT Services used their technology platforms to enhance networking, knowledge-sharing, and collaboration.  


It features an approach to “building flows of information into pertinent, useful and just-in-time knowledge” so that...  knowledge can flow in order to foster trust and credibility.

      

______________________________

    

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.   ...It means giving up control. 

   

_______________________________
       
Creating this two-way flow of dialogue, practice, expertise, and interest, can be the foundation of a 
wirearchy.

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.


....many companies today have strong networks...coupled with strong central control. Becoming a wirearchy requires new organizational structures that incorporate communities, networks, and cooperative behaviours. It means giving up control. The job of those in leaderships roles is to help the network make better decisions. 



Related tools & posts by Deb:


See the companion post about Holacracy, here.

           

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Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 2014 1:46 PM

well worth the reading time.

InflatableCostumes's curator insight, March 7, 2014 7:26 AM

 Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 17, 2014 2:23 PM

I just featured the called out quote above about complexity (over complicated, bureaucratic), and less hierarchy, more communication via networks in my most recent post about letting go of industrial age thinking via the command and control nature of performance appraisals.  

Wirearchy and holacracy (think Zappos) are alternatives that embrace networked learning.  One is arguably a set of principles, the latter is an organization design approach that deemphasizes management.

~  Deb

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Zappos says Goodbye to Bosses & Bureaucracy - Hello to Holacracy

Zappos says Goodbye to Bosses & Bureaucracy - Hello to Holacracy | Homo Agilis (Collective Intelligence, Agility and Sustainability : The Future is already here) | Scoop.it

The famed, unique Las Vegas-based shoe retailer...will eliminate traditional managers, do away with the typical corporate hierarchy and get rid of job titles, at least internally.

__________________
 
....bureaucracy ...was getting in the way of adaptability.”

    

__________________


The unusual approach is called a “holacracy,” replacing the traditional corporate chain of command with a series of overlapping, self-governing “circles.” In theory, this gives employees more of a voice in the way the company is run.


According to Zappos executives, the move is an effort to keep the 1,500-person company from becoming too rigid, too unwieldy and too bureaucratic as it grows.


“As we scaled, we noticed that the bureaucracy we were all used to was getting in the way of adaptability,” says Zappos’s John Bunch, who is helping lead the transition to the new structure.


Holacracy ...has a couple of high-profile devotees — Twitter cofounder Evan Williams uses it at his new company, Medium, and time management guru David Allen uses it run his firm — but Zappos is by far the largest company to adopt the idea.]


Related posts & tools by Deb:


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 6, 2014 8:22 PM

I'm intrigued to see this second emergence of holacracy.  Do we have an agile organizational structure developing here?

I'm sensing the far edge of a trend here, especially after facilitating Open Space events (self-led interest topics on a theme) in the last couple of years,.  I've mostly used them in a professional learning context, although three client organizations have used this organic, adaptible format for planning & strategy.  


In my view. it seems that these leaders are shifting perspective, letting go of some of the trappings of the 90's, to embrance more adaptive structures that can help fuel innovation.  ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 6, 2014 8:44 PM

Adaptive communication.  It's time for something far beyond Fredrick Taylor's scientific management 1920's style bureacraciy.  I'm sensing this is the calm before the storm of change to move beyond traditional management structures.  There will be more holacracies and their kin to come.  ~  D