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My Baby Just Cares For Me (1930)

Ted Weems & His Orchestra
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It's not death I fear, but dying in the torture chamber

It's not death I fear, but dying in the torture chamber | Homecare | Scoop.it
Polly Toynbee: The right to die in peace will be hard fought because of unfounded fears of a 'slippery slope', but we need to change the law
Jan Bergmans's insight:

For the generation that won on abortion, contraception and gay liberation, the principle was always the right to do what you like with your own body – and that includes a right to die in peace. All these freedoms were won in the face of ferocious opposition from the same hell-in-a-handcart brigade. I had thought all minds were made up, ideological battle lines uncrossable, so Lord Carey, former evangelical archbishop, is a most unlikely and thus especially welcome convert to the assisted dying cause. Archbishop Tutu's eloquent abhorrence at Nelson Mandela's last days offers a perfect example of why dignity in death is an essential part of a good life.

The arrival of these Christian leaders, both well experienced in death-bed scenes, breaks the notion that life is sacred and only God can dispose of us in his own good time. But that still guides the current archbishop of Canterbury, as well as the Catholics and other faiths that pack the Lords in greater numbers than among the public. How odd that many Catholics pray to St Joseph for a good death, and yet deny it to themselves. Scrape below the surface and you will see during Friday's debate that almost all speaking against this freedom are religious, but they will shroud faith reasons behind other arguments.

Those, like me, who have watched a parent die too slowly and painfully, yearning for a quicker end, would want to escape that fate ourselves, making our choice, in our own good time. Switzerland's Dignitas clinic is a grim way to go, yet one Briton each fortnight takes that lonely route for fear of an agonising death here. The myth of the good death on morphine needs to be exposed: there is no dreamy drifting away. Hallucinations can be terrifying and months of extreme and humiliating constipation bring a death not focused on eternities, but on the bowels. Nor do opioids necessarily relieve, let alone remove severe pain. None of us knows until the time comes what pain we can withstand, what value we will place on our last days of life or if we want to end it sooner. But 80% of people wisely say they want that choice, according to polls over many years.

Of all the bad arguments, the most common is the infamous "slippery slope", warning this will lead to extermination of all imperfect or inconvenient human beings. Let the dying depart a few months before the end and gas chambers for the feeble minded will follow. Greedy relatives will press the potion on their parents, eager for the inheritance or just to be rid of the muddles and puddles of the decrepit. The "slippery slope" imbues all moral panic arguments – do this, and other direst consequences follow, as night does day. Slippery slopes have the left accusing any act on the right as the path to fascism or the right claiming anything social democratic leads down the road to Stalinism. We all stand on slippery slopes, if the alternative is to stand at an extreme at either end. But law exists as perpetual arbitrator of slippery slopes – thus far and no further – in every aspect of life, defining, refining, grading degrees of acceptability in a world of shifting greys.

This bill slips down no slopes, as Lord Falconer's safeguards are solid. Two doctors, acting independently, must confirm a patient is likely to die within six months, is of sound mind, has decided without pressure, is told of palliative options and is able to take the medication themselves, after a cooling-off period of reflection. A sunset clause means the law is repealed in 10 years, requiring parliament to vote it in again. How often will it be used? After 17 years of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act 80 people out of 30,000 deaths used it last year. Peace of mind is knowing you can.

If ever parliament wanted to extend the right to die to those such as quadriplegic Tony Nicklinson, then that debate will be had. I would favour it, others wouldn't, but it's a new discussion on another law, not a slippery slide. Eventually, my guess is that law would be passed too, because again it has overwhelming public support. But that's no reason to refuse the Falconer bill.

Another bad argument is that the frail will be intimidated into hastening the end of their lives so as not to be a burden on their children. Well, why not? I would not choose to put unbearable caring duties on my four children. I hope not to leave them with a miserable memory of a wretched prolonged and agonising end. That's not a bad reason.

Finally, opponents say the right to die is a dangerous substitute for good care, but that's disingenuous. I've worked in an old people's home and visited dementia wards where no one wants to be. Blame the lack of money or care, do better – but in truth, what saddens most is the wretched condition of the people themselves, often openly asking for death.

A high proportion of NHS costs are spent on the last six months of life – and badly spent. Aversion to facing the inevitability of death is expensive and rarely conducive to ensuring people die well. I think I am not overly afraid of dying, but I won't know until I get there. What I do know is that I greatly fear departing through the torture chamber.

Today yet more distinguished doctors write to members of the House of Lords in support of the bill: polls find more doctors want the right to die for themselves than don't. On this bill more peers have requested to speak than on any bill ever. If opponents think they have the numbers, they'll push for a vote on a wrecking amendment, a delay with an imaginary royal commission. If not, it will pass the Lords by December, when it is for the government to find time in the Commons – of which snowballs have a better chance in hell. MPs are afraid of the religious in their constituencies before the election – even though no seat was ever won or lost on these moral issues. Falconer's hope is that parties will at least put a promise of a Commons vote in their manifestos, but parliament has always trailed far behind the public on moral matters. This craven cowardice is one reason politicians are so despised.

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Nutridrink (per 4) - Sorgente

Nutridrink (per 4) - Sorgente | Homecare | Scoop.it
Aanvullende en volledige drinkvoeding met toegevoegde vitamines en mineralen.
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HoudbaarheidOngeopend: Bij kamertemperatuur houdbaar tot op de verpakking aangegeven datum.Geopend: Afgesloten in de koelkast maximaal 24 uur houdbaar.

Datum : 07-06-2014 ( maand oud )

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Accurate Healthcare | Medical Billing, Equipment and Supply Services

Accurate Healthcare | Medical Billing, Equipment and Supply Services | Homecare | Scoop.it
Accurate Healthcare, Inc. has over 30 years of healthcare industry related experience among management and staff. In addition to Part B billing services,
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Over Kracht en Kwetsbaarheid....: Allemaal onmacht

Over Kracht en Kwetsbaarheid....: Allemaal onmacht | Homecare | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Dodelijke blikken
Thuis kijk ik in zijn portemonnaie. Nog even hoop ik dat daar die nieuwe pas in zit. Maar dat is niet zo. Wél die van die andere rekening. Maar... die pas wordt nooit gebruikt. Ik weet de pincode niet en vraag me af of Wim hem wel weet. Ik rijd terug naar de bank, waar Wim me hoopvol aankijkt.
"Weet jij de pincode van deze pas?", vraag ik hem. En wat ik al vreesde, hij weet het ook niet. Ondertussen worden zijn blikken naar mij weer dodelijk. En de mevrouw van de bureaucratische veiligheidshandelingen mag er ook van mee genieten.
Ik ga gewoon verder met de mevrouw: "Hoe lossen we dit op?". Ze kan voor de ene rekening een melding doen dat de pas nooit is ontvangen en een nieuwe pas aanvragen, en voor de andere een nieuwe pincode. Allebei duurt het vier dagen. Wim laat zijn ongenoegen hoorbaar blijken. Ik negeer het. "Oke, laten we dat doen", zeg ik. "Dat aanvragen van die pincode moet telefonisch, ik zal nu meteen voor u bellen", zegt de mevrouw. Ze belt. Blijkbaar vraagt degene aan de andere kant van de lijn waarom de eigenaar van de pas dan niet zelf belt. "Ja, dat kan niet", zegt de mevrouw. Daar neemt die ander blijkbaar geen genoegen mee. "Meneer staat hier met zijn vrouw voor me bij het loket, en ik bel voor hem...... nee, meneer kan zelf niet bellen.... nee, dat is technisch onmogelijk zeg maar."  Ze loopt rood aan in haar hals en lijkt boos op degene aan de andere kant van de lijn. "Nee.... technisch onmogelijk..". Ze voelt zich duidelijk ongemakkelijk en wil blijkbaar waar wij bij zijn niet benoemen dat Wim door de telefoon zeer moeilijk te verstaan is. Ik moet er wel om lachen en besluit haar een handje te helpen. "Zeg maar dat meneer een spraakprobleem heeft". Ze zuchtte van opluchting. "Ik bel omdat meneer een spraakprobleem heeft" zei ze toen. En ja, toen was het geregeld.
Nu gewoon even vier dagen wachten en dan gaan we nog een keer. Om de pincode op te halen en om het telefoonnummer door te geven voor het ontvangen van de TAN codes. Dat kan dan ook met de nieuwe pas, die dan weer wel gewoon per post toegestuurd wordt. Allemaal voor onze eigen veiligheid.....

Onmacht
Als we buiten zijn zegt Wim tegen me: "Jij hebt vast vorig jaar die nieuwe pas doorgeknipt in plaats van de oude". Ja, dat zou goed kunnen. Zo'n kluns ben ik soms. Hij lacht naar me: "Wat een stel zijn wij toch he?" Ik lach terug en vergeet ogenblikkelijk mijn frustratie over zijn dodende blikken en verwijtende opmerkingen. Het is allemaal onmacht.

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Aging and Identity Part III: We're Not Dead Yet - Stan Goldberg, Ph.D.

Aging and Identity Part III: We're Not Dead Yet - Stan Goldberg, Ph.D. | Homecare | Scoop.it
We may be changing, but we’re not dead yet. I think people who are younger than us—like our adult children—are often confused about how to react to our diminishing abilities.
Jan Bergmans's insight:
To read the entire article click here. If you know someone who might find my material useful, please ask them to visit stangoldbergwriter.com and become a subscriber. There is a free ebook on change waiting for them. Thanks for your help.
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Aging and Identity Part II-When the Ground Shakes - Stan Goldberg, Ph.D.

Aging and Identity Part II-When the Ground Shakes - Stan Goldberg, Ph.D. | Homecare | Scoop.it
In 2009 I wrote, When the Ground Shakes, an article in which I described finding my mother coming out of a forested area holding a bunch of sticks and twigs. In response to my question of what she was doing, she replied, “straightening out the forest.” Now, twenty years after I was mystified by her …
Jan Bergmans's insight:

In 2009 I wrote, When the Ground Shakes, an article in which I described finding my mother coming out of a forested area holding a bunch of sticks and twigs. In response to my question of what she was doing, she replied, “straightening out the forest.” Now, twenty years after I was mystified by her behavior, I find myself doing the same thing.Click here to read the entire article.

If you know someone who might find my material useful, please ask them to visit stangoldbergwriter.com and become a subscriber. There is a free ebook on change waiting for them. Thanks for your help.

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Can dreams solve other people's problems ? - Unexplained Mysteries

Can dreams solve other people's problems ? - Unexplained Mysteries | Homecare | Scoop.it
A new study has suggested that it may be possible to learn about someone else's problems while asleep.
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The claim is based on research by distinguished cognitive scientist and experimentalist Carlyle Smith who aimed to find out whether it was possible to dream about someone else's problems by studying a photograph of that person before going to sleep.

In a series of experiments Smith picked a number of test subjects and had volunteers recall details of their dreams upon waking up. Some were shown a photograph of a particular test subject before sleeping while others weren't shown any photographs at all.

By analyzing the results based on a number of generalized elements associated with the problems of the target, Smith demonstrated that the participants who had been shown a photograph beforehand seemed to dream more frequently about problems the target subject had been experiencing.

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~ Fibromyalgia Butterfly ~

~ Fibromyalgia Butterfly ~ | Homecare | Scoop.it

Via Mary E. Berens-Oney
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Mary E. Berens-Oney's curator insight, April 13, 5:58 AM

The Butterfly is a sign of Hope ..... 

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Aging and Identity: Part 1-The Perfect Storm - Stan Goldberg, Ph.D.

Aging and Identity: Part 1-The Perfect Storm - Stan Goldberg, Ph.D. | Homecare | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Rarely do I find the insults deliberate. Most stem from not understanding how the physical and psychological aspects of aging can produce epic personality changes.

This is the first of a three-part series exploring identity, changes, and aging. In this article, I’ll explain five components of identity and how aging affects each. In the second article, I’ll share helpful strategies for those who can still remember twenty-five-cent McDonalds hamburgers. I learned these from hospice patients I served and caregivers I counseled over the past ten years. The final article will contain suggestions for people who can’t quite understand why their parents and other older people have become so unreasonable.

The Aging World

For most people, aging is synonymous with a shrinking world. We retire, shrinking our social contacts and often goal-related activities. We become ill or disabled and either lose the ability to engage in activities important to us, or bumble through them. We lose our partners and face the world alone. And of course, we realize the time left for us is less than the time we have lived.

All of us—regardless of age—are what we do, believe, think, experienced and how close we place ourselves to death.  When significant changes occur in any of these areas, our identities are shaken, often resulting in becoming a person we don’t like and someone misunderstood by others. With older folks, the changes tend to occur in more areas and often are dramatic.

Identity and Aging

As we age, our identity changes, despite the view of some who believe there is an unchangeable “core”; one that remains steady regardless of what happens to us and what we do. In an abstract sense, this belief may be true. But try convincing someone who has undergone dramatic changes of the concept’s practicality. Folks such as:

An active person who can’t participate in any of his favorite sports because of a less than successful hip replacement

A devoutly religious woman who learns her son was molested by their priest

A Fortune-500 executive who’s early-onset Alzheimer’s makes it difficult to count change for a dollar.

A Black man who was discriminated against his entire life listening to explanations of why voter rights laws are no longer necessary

An aging Jazz pianist who knows he doesn’t have enough time to become as innovative as Keith Jarrett.

What We Do

In 2012, I wrote, I’m Different: Illness-Based Identity, in which I described how identities are partially based on the activities we do. Sometimes the disruptions in our lives are dramatic, as when a heart attack results in lowered physical activity. But often it’s as subtle as when a person’s ability to knit dwindles after years of chronic and acute arthritis.

The Problem. Statistically, older people tend to become more ill, more fragile, and face more life-changing disabling conditions than younger people. The heart attack may not result in identity changes for someone who was sedentary, and the arthritis may be inconsequential for the person who occationally  knits. But identity changes become dramatic for a life-long runner who had a heart attack and person who spends hours each day knitting.

Beliefs

We glide through our lives guided by “shouldisms” we believe are true, moral, ethical, or are in our self-interest. Regardless if these values are religious or non-sectarian, there is an assumption that not only are they important for the person who adheres to them, but should apply to everyone.

In a constantly changing world, these beliefs are not immune to assaults. When guidelines for how we conduct ourselves are under attack, we can choose to accommodate the changes, or fight to retain them. Regardless of the choice, the struggle affects our identity.

The Problem. To accept the changes means what we believed our entire lives may be false. To defend them adds a defensive layer to our persona that can be just as disruptive as accepting the changes, as evidenced by the conflicts generated by same-sex marriage laws, legalization of marijuana, or the election of a President whose ethnicity is denigrated, just to mention a few.

 

Thinking

Our thinking is based on how we manage what we know. Without getting too technical, three major components of thinking are, short term memory, long term memory, and executive functioning.

Short term memory involves the ability to retrieve information about something that just happened—I want to make an omelet, and I need to retrieve the eggs I just bought and placed in the refrigerator.

Long term memory is short-term memory that moved to long-term memory after I slept—To make the omelet I’ll need to find the chili powder I placed on one of the pantry shelves last week.

Executive functioning is my ability to manipulate what is stored in short and long term memory—how to assemble all of the ingredients for an omelet, combining them to make a mixture I will place in a pan, and heating them for a set amount of time.

The Problem. Although each is independent, problems in short and long term memory are mistakenly thought to signal declining intelligence; a deterioration of executive functioning.

Experiences

How we perceive the world determines how we interact with others. And our perceptions may be distorted by our history. For example, a holocaust survivor’s negative view of anything German in 2014, might have been indelibly etched in her mind in 1941.

The Problem. The more the experiences, the greater the possibility what we witness today is interpreted through what we experienced in our past. The longer we live, the greater the possibility our understanding of the present world will be shaped by our past.

Relationship to Death

While the world of a younger person is expanding, the world of elders is shrinking. Our abilities decline, friendships are lost through death, and there is the realization the time we have left is limited. The degree we accept the inevitability of death is the eight-hundred pound gorilla in the room, directing our everyday decisions as if it were “The Great Oz,” behind the curtain in The Wizard of Oz.

The Problem. As our world contracts and changes, there is a need to grasp at what’s stable. For example, it can be the need for having dinner at the same time each day, or resistance to new forms of communication, such as texting on a smart-phone.

CONCLUSIONS

Aging is an inevitable and often frightening occurrence for those who experience it, and confusing for younger people who interact with those of us who live it. Many of the glib suggestions for how one can gracefully and joyfully become old, find little value for those of us who are dealing with it and those who are trying to be sensitive to our needs. But approaching aging from the perspective of a changing identity, results in a less glamorous by more realistic understanding of this normal and inevitable phenomenon. In Part II, next month, I’ll explore how those of us who are aging can do it more successfully and less painfully.

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Blood test could predict risk of Alzheimer's disease, dementia in elderly - Fox News

Blood test could predict risk of Alzheimer's disease, dementia in elderly - Fox News | Homecare | Scoop.it
Daily Mail Blood test could predict risk of Alzheimer's disease, dementia in elderly Fox News Scientists have developed a blood test that they say could lead to an early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia in elderly people...
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Arts mag patiënt overdragen bij hongerdood - Nieuws.nl

Arts mag patiënt overdragen bij hongerdood - Nieuws.nl | Homecare | Scoop.it
Artsen mogen patiënten die hun leven willen eindigen door te stoppen met eten en drinken, overdragen aan een collega. Wanneer een arts principiële of emotionele problemen heeft met deze manier van...
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bvdb's comment, January 11, 1:33 AM
Dat is niet meer dan normaal. ... Dat is toch ook zeo in het geval van euthanasie.
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Welcome | Live Music Now

Welcome | Live Music Now | Homecare | Scoop.it
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Live Music Now (LMN) is the leading
musician development and outreach
organisation in the UK.

Live Music Now's distinctive approach has been developed over 35 years, realising the vision of our founders, Yehudi Menuhin and Ian Stoutzker. We support inspirational young professional musicians to use their talents for the benefit of those who are otherwise excluded from the joy of experiencing live music.
Read more about what we do >>

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Openness predicts cognitive function in bipolar disorder

Openness predicts cognitive function in bipolar disorder | Homecare | Scoop.it
The degree of Openness to Experiences reported by patients with bipolar disorder could be used to identify potential candidates requiring more comprehensive cognitive assessments, US researchers report.
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They found that Openness to Experiences, particularly Openness to Ideas, correlated significantly with measures of cognitive function in their study of 283 patients with bipolar disorder and 110 mentally healthy controls.

Therefore “low Openness to Ideas scores (e.g., below the 9th percentile) may serve as an additional indication to refer [bipolar disorder] patients for whom cognitive functioning is a clinical concern to a specialty cognitive evaluation”, write Deborah Stringer and colleagues, from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

In addition to Openness, the researchers assessed Neuroticism, Extraversion, Conscientiousness and Agreeableness using the 240-item self-reported NEO Personality Inventory – Revised. They also measured cognitive variables such as attention, executive functioning, memory and fine motor skills.

Contrary to expectations, Neuroticism and Extraversion were not significant predictors of cognition in either the patients or controls, even though scores for both of these personality traits were significantly lower in the patients than in the controls.

In fact, Openness was the only personality trait that correlated significantly with any cognitive factor in both patients and controls.

Among the patients, Openness to Ideas correlated with seven of the eight measures of cognitive function – visual and verbal memory, emotion processing, verbal fluency/processing speed, conceptual reasoning/set shifting, processing speed/interference resolution and inhibitory control. There was no correlation with fine motor score.

Related StoriesPredictive factors ‘raise suspicion’ for emergence of bipolar disorderSmartphone app shows promise for detecting early signs of mood changes in people with bipolar disorderMeta-analysis links signalling pathways to bipolar disorder

Openness to Values correlated significantly with five of the eight cognitive factor scores (all but visual memory, conceptual reasoning/set shifting and inhibitory control) while Openness to Fantasy, Feelings and Action each correlated with two to three cognitive factor scores. The final Openness facet, Openness to Aesthetics was not associated with any measure of cognitive function.

In the control group there was moderate, but still significant, correlation between emotion processing and Openness to both Ideas and Values and between fine motor score and Openness to Values.

In multivariate models, Openness to Ideas explained between 2.3% and 6.5% of variance in cognitive scores.

Writing in the Journal of Affective Disorders, Stringer and co-authors suggest that “[i]nterventions designed to encourage novel experiences and an intellectual approach to existing interests are rational treatments for bipolar individuals with modest disruptions in cognitive functioning.”

However they caution that although Openness “is a useful predictor of cognitive functioning, its use does not extend across all the cognitive constructs […] measured, nor does the amount of variance it explains provide enough incremental predictive power to completely solve the problem of whom to refer for complete cognitive assessment.”

Licensed from medwireNews with permission from Springer Healthcare Ltd. ©Springer Healthcare Ltd. All rights reserved. Neither of these parties endorse or recommend any commercial products, services, or equipment.

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LeBlanc: When dementia patients refuse to take medication - Hernando Today

LeBlanc: When dementia patients refuse to take medication - Hernando Today | Homecare | Scoop.it
LeBlanc: When dementia patients refuse to take medication
Hernando Today
If you get frustrated with or angry at them, they're going to feed off of that and you'll never get them to take their medication.
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Primperan Reglan

Primperan Reglan | Homecare | Scoop.it
Definition of Primperan Reglan in the Medical Dictionary by The Free Dictionary
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metoclopramide hydrochloride

[met′əklō′prəmīd]a GI motility agent.indications It is prescribed to stimulate motility of and increase the tone of gastric contractions of the upper GI tract and to prevent emesis.contraindications A history of seizures; concomitant use of drugs that cause extrapyramidal reactions; pheochromocytoma; GI hemorrhage, obstruction, or perforation; or known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use.adverse effects Among the more serious adverse effects are extrapyramidal reactions, usually in children, and GI disturbances. Drowsiness and allergic reactions and rash also may occur.

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Home

Home | Homecare | Scoop.it
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slecht ter been bent | geen vervoer hebt | niet weg kan thuis vanwege de kinderen | druk, druk, druk bent

het te koud is buiten | liever in uw eigen vertrouwde omgeving bent | comfortabel op de bank of in een luie stoel ploft

met een kopje koffie of glaasje wijn erbij | ondertussen de krant of uw favoriete boek wil lezen

nog wat wil werken met uw laptop op schoot | een spelletje wil doen op de i-pad | uw favoriete TV-programma

niet wil missen | gezellig wil bellen met vriend of vriendin | nog moet studeren

zelf niet bij uw voeten kunt vanwege rugklachten of zwangerschap

of natuurlijk om gewoon lekker te genieten van de behandeling

 

Bel voor meer informatie of een afspraak 06 48 79 01 34 of stuur een e-mail naar voetenwerkbreda@me.com

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10 Ways to Love the People in Your Life

10 Ways to Love the People in Your Life | Homecare | Scoop.it
There are a lot of myths about what it really means to love people. These simple guidelines may help you love without losing or compromising yourself.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

. Tell them about their brilliance. They likely can’t see it and they don’t know its immensity, but you can see it, and you can illuminate it for them.

2. Be authentic, and give others the gift of the real you and a real relationship. Ask your real questions. Share your real beliefs. Go for your real dreams. Tell your truth.

3. Don’t confuse “authenticity” with sharing every complaint, resentment, or petty reaction in the name of “being yourself.” Meditate, write, or do yoga to work through anxiety, resentment, and stress on your own so you don’t hand off those negative moods to everyone around you. Sure, share sadness, honest dilemmas, and fears, but be mindful: don’t pollute.

4. Listen, listen, listen. Don’t listen to determine if you agree or disagree. Listen to get to know what is true for the person in front of you. Get to know an inner landscape that is different from your own, and enjoy the journey. Remember that if, in any conversation, nothing piqued your curiosity and nothing surprised you, you weren’t really listening.

5. Don’t waste your time or energy thinking about how they need to be different.  Really. Chuck that whole thing. Their habits are their habits. Their personalities are their personalities. Let them be, and work on what you want to change about you—not what you think would be good to change about them.

6. Remember that you don’t have to understand their choices to respect or accept them.

7. Don’t conflate accepting with being a doormat or betraying yourself. Let them be who they are, entirely. Then, you decide what you need, in light of who they are. Do you need to make a direct request that they change their behavior in some way? Do you need to take care of yourself better? Do you need to set a boundary or to change the relationship? Take care of yourself well, without holding anyone else in contempt.

8. Give of yourself, but never sacrifice or compromise yourself. Stop if resentment is building and retool. Don’t do the martyr thing. It helps no one and nothing.

9. Remember that everyone you encounter was created by divine intelligence and has an important role to play in the universe. Treat them as such.

10. If you want to keep growing emotionally and spiritually for the rest of your life, accept this as your mantra and try to live as if it were true: Everything that I experience from another human being is either love, or a call for love.

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Over Kracht en Kwetsbaarheid....: Mantelzorger; Neem de tijd!

Over Kracht en Kwetsbaarheid....: Mantelzorger; Neem de tijd! | Homecare | Scoop.it
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Mantelzorger; Neem de tijd! 

Sinds een maand roei ik weer. Het was vijftien jaar geleden dat ik voor het laatst in zo'n slanke roeiboot op het water zat en ik was benieuwd of ik het nog zou kunnen. Al jaren kriebelt het als ik roeiers op het water zie. "Ik wil dat ook weer gaan doen", zeg ik dan tegen Wim. "Waarom ga je dan niet?", is steeds zijn reactie. Jarenlang had ik allerlei (mantelzorg)excuses om maar niet te gaan. Ik vond het vervelend voor Wim, vond dat ik thuis moest zijn enzovoort. Maar dit voorjaar was de tijd er rijp voor en ik ging. En... ik heb me in vijftien jaar niet zo vitaal gevoeld. Hoe het zover kwam?

Crisis

In zo'n slanke roeiboot...

Vijftien jaar geleden was ik 40 jaar. Alles zat tegen. Scheiding, ontslag, verhuizen maar toch net niet, vader overleden na kort ziekbed.... Ik zat in een echte midlifecrisis en had nergens puf voor. Samen met mijn twee kinderen zien te overleven, dat was het. Langzaamaan hervond ik mezelf. Ik kwam per ongeluk in Kenia terecht, waar mijn kijk op het leven 180 graden draaide. 'Druk, druk, druk", om te scoren in mijn werkomgeving, zou je mij daarna nooit meer horen zeggen. Ik volgde een opleiding tot hypnotherapeut, waarvan ik achteraf zeg dat het vooral twee jaren waren waarin ikzelf in therapie was. Ik leerde er te vertrouwen op mijn intuïtie. Na zeven jaar alleen, en mezelf enigszins te hebben hervonden, was er weer ruimte voor een man in mijn leven.

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Nuclear Fusion Research Gets Supercomputer Boost

Nuclear Fusion Research Gets Supercomputer Boost | Homecare | Scoop.it
International researchers, who want to harness nuclear fusion to develop sustainable, clean energy, now have a much more powerful supercomputer to facilitate their work.  The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) is increasing the power of the Helios supercomputer in Rokkasho, Japan, from 1.5 Petaflops to nearly 2 Petaflops by adding new Intel…
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Aging and Identity Part II-When the Ground Shakes - Stan Goldberg, Ph.D.

Aging and Identity Part II-When the Ground Shakes - Stan Goldberg, Ph.D. | Homecare | Scoop.it
In 2009 I wrote, When the Ground Shakes, an article in which I described finding my mother coming out of a forested area holding a bunch of sticks and twigs. In response to my question of what she was doing, she replied, “straightening out the forest.” Now, twenty years after I was mystified by her …
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Van Kooten en de Bie reisden de pan uit

Van Kooten en de Bie reisden de pan uit | Homecare | Scoop.it
Compilatie van scènes die geheel is toegesneden op het thema van de boekenweek: Reizen.
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Tips for expats working in health care - KevinMD.com

Tips for expats working in health care - KevinMD.com | Homecare | Scoop.it
How does a working mom and physician keep practicing medicine when her husband's career brings her halfway around the globe? For me, it was an adventure. While it can be challenging, I encourage other physicians to ...
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Profit motive leads to new issues as long-term care goes private - Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Profit motive leads to new issues as long-term care goes private - Honolulu Star-Advertiser | Homecare | Scoop.it
Profit motive leads to new issues as long-term care goes private Honolulu Star-Advertiser Even as public attention is focused on the Affordable Care Act, another health care overhaul is underway in many states: an ambitious effort to restrain the...
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Thank God It's Thursday | Home Care Workers

Thank God It's Thursday | Home Care Workers | Homecare | Scoop.it
http://youtu.be/3XFfUt7HQWM What I feel, I can't say But my love is there for you anytime of day But if it's not love that you need Then I'll try my best to make everything succeed Tell me, what is...
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Gene offers an athlete's heart without the exercise | Machines Like Us

Gene offers an athlete's heart without the exercise | Machines Like Us | Homecare | Scoop.it

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have found that a single gene poses a double threat to disease: Not only does it inhibit the growth and spread of breast tumors, but it also makes hearts healthier.


Via LeapMind
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