Home Recording Studios
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Careers in Music - Home Recording vs Studio | Careers in Music

The benefits of a recording studio vs recording at home. Advantages of using the studio engineer.
Zack Seavey's insight:

Having a recording studio in your house is nice, but is it up to standards? This article goes over the good and bad about an in home studio. The pro- It is right there and you can use it at anytime. The Cons- You have to sound proof everything. Then making sure the mic is in the right place and not having the best equipment at your finger tips. 

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Fletcher Moses's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:59 PM

 This article explains that A project studio requires an very advanced professional engineer that can use special tricks to contain sound. Also A engineer that knows about the room acoustics. A project studio if more difficult to control then a professional one

Jake Cohen's curator insight, October 8, 2014 1:57 PM

This article was more directed at the consumer rather than the professional.  I thought it was interesting because it was one of the only articles I have read that cited spending money as a positive thing about a professional studio vs. a home studio. The authors stated that spending money to be in a pro studio could motivate you to use time in a more effective way because time is money. 

Lucius Todd's curator insight, October 11, 2015 5:36 PM

I think this article gives great detail on professional studio, but lacks the home recording aspects and advantages. This will be a great article for those who are against home recording.

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Recording: Home VS. Studio | Delicious Audio

Recording: Home VS. Studio | Delicious Audio | Home Recording Studios | Scoop.it
Zack Seavey's insight:

I have to agree with this article some what. I would love to have a home studio only if I had the money to spend on a really nice one. If I don't then there are problems like feeling inspired at 3 or 4 am and my neighbors are sleeping. Then the noise from out side will cause a problem as well. Pros- You can record. Cons- you get the cops called on you and can't pay the fine if you get one cause you spent it on a cheap home studio.

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JAYLEW's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:49 PM

The article goes in depth on the way recording had progressed from the days of Motown to today. From using professional grade equipment inside a home,church or hotel to using a professional studio with its equipment all the points made were relative to how recording differed from each. It went into the cost of equipment and time using it to using basic equipment and perspectives on your own process. Going over how different settings and locations can help out a recording like catching outward sounds from your place while recording at home or near a place with sounds coming from life like a plan flying by when your where talking about it. In all this is a great source of information on the difference between the two studios.

Fletcher Moses's curator insight, September 11, 2014 11:09 PM

This description gets into a very broad details about the differences between a project studio and a professional studio. The author includes the sound proofing differences, good acoustics and critical listening. Any thing from the room to the recording can be a big difference in a song

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Home recording studios challenge the majors | Tune In Music City | The Tennessean

Home recording studios challenge the majors | Tune In Music City | The Tennessean | Home Recording Studios | Scoop.it

Via Soulman's Daughter, Shad Wave
Zack Seavey's insight:

I have to say this article really goes into how much the big studios are taking a hit. Now they are going to rent out some of their equipment just to keep money coming in. 

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Soulman's Daughter's curator insight, August 14, 2013 5:41 PM

This article comes from a reputable source whose focus is within the music business. The author is easily verified on the website, and carries many followers on this blog. Its information provides two sides to the coin, ensuring its neutrality and objectivity in its standpoint. The article was written by an author involved in the music business, making this source reliable in regards to its accuracy of information.

Shad Wave's curator insight, August 16, 2013 8:12 PM

My insight was just years ago there was not that many places that big artist go to recorde but now because of home studios there plenty places you could go now and there starting to really advertise it. and its hurting the big studios.

Yadaliz Rivera's curator insight, January 19, 2014 11:37 PM

In the recording industry, on a daily bases you see more artists and producers looking towards home studios instead of going to professional ones for many reasons. Accesibility is a big role player as is how easily a song or an album can now be recorded instead of the longer process that recording in a professional studio would take.

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Audio Production Studios in the US Industry Market Research Report from IBISWorld has Been Updated

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) August 19, 2013 The advent of the internet sparked a massive structural change in how media is consumed, distributed and recorded, drastically affecting the Audio Production Studios industry.
Zack Seavey's insight:

I find this article credible because it worked with a few businesses to get the numbers on how much sales have declined. I agree with the fact that record sales have gone down, but the sale of music equipment has gone up. Then the years of experience of a mix and master engineer you have at a label cant be matched at home. Pros- invest in home recording equipment and get the experience. Cons- Don't go toward records for putting music out. Well don't put out a bunch of records.

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JAYLEW's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:57 PM

The bases of this article was to give insight on how the internet changed the way people and companies do music today. It went into details on why and how the internet changed the way music is done and the impact it has  for music and the way its being made and processed today. This is a great read to gain knowledge on what the intent has done for music.

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Could home recording doom professional music studios?

Could home recording doom professional music studios? | Home Recording Studios | Scoop.it
Inexpensive home recording equipment helps artists rise from outside the mainstream labels.

Via Soulman's Daughter, Shad Wave
Zack Seavey's insight:

This article goes over how the new technology for recording is killing the studio industry. I say it is, but someone in the studio came up with this idea and went with it. Also it makes it easier budget wise for the engineer to do work and charge their own rate.

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Emilia Medhanie's curator insight, August 16, 2014 8:58 PM

Artist are saving money by recording at home. See how this is affecting Professional studios.

Jake Cohen's curator insight, October 8, 2014 12:53 PM

I found this article to be very informative. While neither the publication (Christian Science Monitor) nor the author specializes in the world of music and recording, both are part of very reliable news source. Also, the author includes quotes from people who are professionals and specialize in recording industry to provide the necessary expertise to make this article reliable. I felt like this article was also fairly unbiased in that, the author seemed to be almost moderation a debate on the issue of Home Recording Studios vs Profession Studios. He had quotes from both sides of the issue and used the information effectively to discuss the topic.

 

Sean Rodriguez's curator insight, December 4, 2015 11:35 AM

I believe this article brings some good information out about how many people are shifting from recording in traditional recording studios to now trying their hand in their own home with a computer. It brings up relevant material and some facts about spending on equipment.

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The New York Times > Arts > Music > Home Sweet Studio

The New York Times > Arts > Music > Home Sweet Studio | Home Recording Studios | Scoop.it
Making an album used to mean booking time in an expensive professional studio; now, it can be a matter of rolling out of bed and pressing a button.

Via Soulman's Daughter, Shad Wave
Zack Seavey's insight:

This article makes a good point that studios can cost up to a few hundred and hour, but then if you buy pro tools and the plug in interface its about $450. Over all its the lower cost that are beating the bigger companies. It paints a picture with actual artists doing it today and saving money.

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Soulman's Daughter's curator insight, August 14, 2013 7:11 PM

This source is from the New York Times, a reputable and well-known news magazine, that entails a range of topics. In this article, an insight into the development and boom of the home recording studio, takes an informative and enlightening approach in engaging the reader. This article was written in 2005, however the information is still objective in natuer and relates to the topic involved. The writer was easy to verify, with a quick link to their name, showing their previous works and their credentials. The writer is centered in music for New York Times, and can be relied on for their consistency and reputation that they have gained. 

Shad Wave's curator insight, August 16, 2013 8:22 PM

This article tells how more and more top 40 songs are starting to come home studios and not big studios.

Sean Rodriguez's curator insight, December 4, 2015 11:42 AM

This source is from the New York Times. It delves into how convenient home recording can be compared to recording in a studio. It also explores the mindset comparisons of the two. I believe this article shares just how much this can benefit the artist and can be a good thing.