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Scooped by Jean Newman
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H1N1 fears spur extra flu vaccine demand

H1N1 fears spur extra flu vaccine demand | Home Life | Scoop.it
More than 90 per cent of flu cases this year in Canada have been of the H1N1 strain (H1N1 fears spur extra flu #vaccine demand #vaxfax http://t.co/1arFlkXPrj)...
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Electric Beard Shavers

Electric Beard Shavers | Home Life | Scoop.it
These are the best beard trimmers available on the market. We take a look at each product and tell you which works well.
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Rescooped by Jean Newman from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
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25 Natural Remedies for Dry Skin

25 Natural Remedies for Dry Skin | Home Life | Scoop.it
Natural dry skin care tips will enable you to acquire that glowing and youthful complexion you crave for, with simple and inexpensive home remedies.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Rescooped by Jean Newman from The Asian Food Gazette.
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What's so healthy about Japanese food? | Just Hungry

What's so healthy about Japanese food? | Just Hungry | Home Life | Scoop.it
Just Hungry is a food site dedicated to Japanese home cooking recipes for people living outside of Japan and healthy and delicious eating.

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Interest in medical uses for Android platform surpasses iPhone

Interest in medical uses for Android platform surpasses iPhone | Home Life | Scoop.it

Searches for android medical recently surpassed searches for iPhone medical according to Google Trends analysis.

 

The Apple iPhone started as the first dominant smartphone, but Android operating system smartphones are now growing in number and claiming an increasingly large share of the market.


This Google Trends analysis below shows the relatively recent emergence of Android medical as an equal if not leading medical device in Google search. The take home message for app developers is to not ignore the Android operating system when planning and producing medical apps. Search interest in iPhone and iPad medical still remains high. Google Trends is a promising tool for continued monitoring of trends and geographic regional patterns in medical app device interest.


The screen shot for the first comparison is shown below with iPhone medical plotted in blue and Android medical plotted in red. Several noteworthy findings can be seen in this comparison. First, iPhone medical clearly emerges as the earliest device with a nearly two year period before Android medical. Second, the iPhone medical keyword search peaked in early 2012. It is trending downward since that time. Third, Google Trends shows Android medical search terms recently equaling and then surpassing iPhone medical searches.

 

In the second screen shot, the Google Trends forecast function shows expected trends in searches for the next few months. The forecast lines for the next six months show a trend for increasing Android medical searches with a stagnant trend for iPhone medical searches.

 

In the third screen shot, Windows medical search finally appears on the radar in 2013, over four years after iPhone medical. The number of searches is relatively small in comparison to both iPhone and Android medical searches.

 

Like the iPhone, the iPad emerged as the early leader in tablets. In the final screen shot, iPad medical searches in 2010 shows a significant upward trend through 2011-2012. There appears, however, to be a decrease in iPad medical searches over the last year.

 

Interestingly, the regional distribution of trends by devices shows a predominance of iPhone medical search interest in the United States, Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom. In contrast, the highest regional trend for Android medical search comes from Pakistan, the Philippines and India.


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Rescooped by Jean Newman from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
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The 10 Dirtiest Spots in Your Kitchen

The 10 Dirtiest Spots in Your Kitchen | Home Life | Scoop.it
Use this cleaning checklist to kill all the germs in your cooking zone

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Rescooped by Jean Newman from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
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How to Be Handsome: 11 Really Terrible 19th-Century Beauty Tips

How to Be Handsome: 11 Really Terrible 19th-Century Beauty Tips | Home Life | Scoop.it
A lot of things have changed since the 19th century. When Barkham Burroughs wrote his Encyclopaedia of Astounding Facts and Useful Information in 1889, he devoted a full chapter to the "secrets of beauty," and for good reason.

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Rescooped by Jean Newman from IT Books Free Share
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The Healthy Programmer: Get Fit, Feel Better, and Keep Coding - Free eBook Share

The Healthy Programmer: Get Fit, Feel Better, and Keep Coding - Free eBook Share | Home Life | Scoop.it
eBook Free Download: The Healthy Programmer: Get Fit, Feel Better, and Keep Coding | PDF, EPUB | ISBN: 1937785319 | 2013-07-03 | English | PutLocker

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Fox eBook's curator insight, August 22, 2013 9:03 PM

To keep doing what you love, you need to maintain your own systems, not just the ones you write codefor. Regular exercise and proper nutrition help you learn, remember, concentrate, and be creative–skills critical to doing your job well. Learn how to change your work habits, master exercises that make working at a computer more comfortable, and develop a plan to keep fit, healthy, and sharp for years to come.

Small changes to your habits can improve your health–without getting in the way of your work. The Healthy Programmer gives you a daily plan of action that’s incremental and iterative just like the software development processes you’re used to. Every tip, trick, and best practice is backed up by the advice of doctors, scientists, therapists, nutritionists, and numerous fitness experts.

We’ll review the latest scientific research to understand how being healthy is good for your body and mind. You’ll start by adding a small amount of simple activity to your day–no trips to the gym needed. You’ll learn how to mitigate back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, headaches, and many other common sources of pain.

You’ll also learn how to refactor your diet to properly fuel your body without gaining weight or feeling hungry. Then, you’ll turn the exercises and activities into a pragmatic workout methodology that doesn’t interfere with the demands of your job and may actually improve your cognitive skills.

You’ll also learn the secrets of prominent figures in the software community who turned their health around by making diet and exercise changes. Throughout, you’ll track your progress with a “companion iPhoneapp”:https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/the-healthy-programmer/id576258650.

Finally, you’ll learn how to make your healthy lifestyle pragmatic, attainable, and fun. If you’re going to live well, you should enjoy it.

Disclaimer

This book is intended only as an informative guide for those wishing to know more about health issues. In no way is this book intended to replace, countermand, or conflict with the advice given to you by your own healthcare provider including Physician, Nurse Practitioner, Physician Assistant, Registered Dietician, and other licensed professionals.

Keep in mind that results vary from person to person. This book is not intended as a substitute for medicalor nutritional advice from a healthcare provider or dietician. Some people have a medical history and/or condition and/or nutritional requirements that warrant individualized recommendations and, in some cases, medications and healthcare surveillance.

Do not start, stop, or change medication and dietary recommendations without professional medical and/or Registered Dietician advice. A healthcare provider should be consulted if you are on medication or if there are any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention. Do not change your diet if you are ill, or on medication except under the supervision of a healthcare provider. Neither this, nor any other book or discussion forum is intended to take the place of personalized medical care of treatment provided by your healthcare provider.

This book was current as of January, 2013 and as new information becomes available through research, experience, or changes to product contents, some of the data in this book may become invalid. You should seek the most up to date information on your medical care and treatment from your health care professional. The ultimate decision concerning care should be made between you and your healthcare provider.

Information in this book is general and is offered with no guarantees on the part of the author, editor or The Pragmatic Programmers, LLC. The author, editors and publisher disclaim all liability in connection with the use of this book.

Printed in full color.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Making Changes
Chapter 2. Bootstrapping Your Health
Chapter 3. A Farewell to Chairs?
Chapter 4. Agile Dieting
Chapter 5. Preventing Headaches and Eye Strain
Chapter 6. Preventing Back Pain
Chapter 7. Preventing Wrist Pain
Chapter 8. Making Exercise Pragmatic
Chapter 9. Thinking Outside the Cube
Chapter 10. Refactoring Your Fitness
Chapter 11. Teaming Up
Chapter 12. Onward, Healthy Programmer

Appendix A1. Goals
Appendix A2. Examples
Appendix A3. Further Reading
Appendix A4. Bibliography

 

Free Download Here: http://www.foxebook.net/the-healthy-programmer-get-fit-feel-better-and-keep-coding/

Rescooped by Jean Newman from healthcare technology
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A portable device for common kidney tests

A portable device for common kidney tests | Home Life | Scoop.it

A lightweight and field-portable device invented at UCLA that conducts kidney tests and transmits data through a smartphone attachment may significantly reduce the need for frequent office visits by people with diabetes and others with chronic kidney ailments.

The smartphone-based device was developed in the research lab of Aydogan Ozcan, a professor of electrical engineering and bioengineering at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, and associate director of the California NanoSystems Institute. Weighing about one-third of a pound, the gadget can determine levels of albumin in the patient's urine and transmit the results within seconds. Albumin is a protein in blood that is a sign of danger when found in urine.


Ozcan's lab also developed the opto-mechanical phone attachment, disposable test tubes, Android app and software to transmit the data. The research was published this month by the peer-reviewed journal Lab on a Chip ("Albumin testing in urine using a smart-phone").


"Albumin testing is frequently done to assess kidney damage, especially for diabetes patients," Ozcan said. "This device provides an extremely convenient platform for chronic patients at home or in remote locations where cell phones work."


Patients at risk for diabetes, kidney disease and other ailments must regularly provide fluid samples — sometimes more than one a day — to monitor their health, which requires visits to labs or health centers.


The new device projects beams of visible light through two small fluorescent tubes attached to the device, one containing a control liquid and the other a urine sample mixed with fluorescent dyes. The smartphone camera captures the fluorescent light after it passes through an additional lens.


An Android application then processes the raw images in less than one second and the device transmits the test results to a database or health care provider. The test, which measures albumin concentration in urine, is accurate to within less than 10 micrograms per milliliter, according to the research, well within accepted clinical standards used in diagnosing conditions such as microalbuminuria, the excretion of albumin in urine.


The time it takes to conduct a test, including preparation of a sample using a small syringe to inject the urine into a fluorescent tube, is about five minutes. Ozcan estimates that the device — for which his lab also has developed an iPhone app — could be produced commercially for $50 to $100 per unit.

 


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