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The High Cost of Losing Urban Trees

The High Cost of Losing Urban Trees | Holistic Forest Management | Scoop.it
Tennessee reaps a $638 million yearly benefit from its urban trees – and an $80 billion loss if they disappeared.

Through energy savings, air and water filtering and carbon storage, the urban trees of Tennessee account for more than $638 million in benefits, according to a report [PDF] conducted by the Forest Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and released earlier this year.

The biggest savings are attributed to carbon storage, which the authors of the report value at an estimated $350 million. Collectively, the state's urban trees store about 16.9 million tons, with each ton stored worth about $20.70 to the state every year. Air and water filtration is also one of the functional benefits of urban trees, and the report estimates the value of this work at $204 million per year. The trees are credited with removing 27,100 tons of pollutants each year, including ozone, particulate matter, and sulfur dioxide. And because of the shading they provide, these urban trees are credited with saving about $66 million in energy costs annually.


Via Lauren Moss
Shaun Scallan's insight:

The urban forest is part of the forest big picture.

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Going Vertical: The History of Green Walls - Landscape Architects Network

Going Vertical: The History of Green Walls - Landscape Architects Network | Holistic Forest Management | Scoop.it
Green walls: Function or fad? As cities and buildings all around the world are being covered in green, we take a look at the phenomenon of green walls.

Via Wes Thomas
Shaun Scallan's insight:

Bring the forest to you. 

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Lee Pratt, MASS, MSA's curator insight, February 21, 5:02 AM

How green are your walls? 

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The value of urban trees

The value of urban trees | Holistic Forest Management | Scoop.it

Pittsburgh has developed software to calculate the value of street trees, and found that it gets far more benefit than it spends, according to Next City.


Via Bhopkins
Shaun Scallan's insight:

Most enlightened cities understand the total "value" of trees and it ain't just dollars.

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Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality

Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality | Holistic Forest Management | Scoop.it
Wealthy cities seem to have it all. Expansive, well-manicured parks. Fine dining. Renowned orchestras and theaters. More trees. Wait, trees?

 

I certainly wouldn't argue that trees create economic inequality, but there appears to be a strong correlation in between high income neighborhoods and large mature trees in cities throughout the world (for a scholarly reference from the Journal, Landscape and Urban Planning, see: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204607002174 ). Why is there such a connection? In terms of landscape analysis, what does this say about those who have created these environments? Why do societies value trees in cities? How does the presence of trees change the sense of place of a particular neighborhood? For more Google images that show the correlation between income and trees (and to share your own), see: http://persquaremile.com/2012/05/24/income-inequality-seen-from-space/


Via Seth Dixon, megan b clement, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Shaun Scallan's insight:

Interesting the value, in the broadest sense, that trees can bring in an urban setting

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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 7:00 AM
this short article explains the evidence supporting tree to rich cities ratio. it goes to show that if I'm going to pay big bucks for location I would want the scenery to be beautiful hands down. they mention the per capita increase to tree ratio and how its only a dollar that influences such a high quantity of trees in city. bottom line is that it makes sense for the more trees in wealthier neighborhoods of the city because when your in the heart of the city you tend to see quantity of quality of homes and being jammed packed into small square footage doesn't leave much room for nature. but go just outside the city where the real estate is high and more spacious and you will find more trees the further and further from the center.
megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 10:04 PM
Like a previous article it explains how if viewing a neighborhood with lush grass and huge yards with landscaped grounds it is associated with big money. People pay top dollar for houses that have huge back yards and privacy of trees. You would not see yards like this is the city though so these neighborhoods on the outskirts of the citylines.
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New Evidence that Urban Trees Add Value – As in Dollars

New Evidence that Urban Trees Add Value – As in Dollars | Holistic Forest Management | Scoop.it
The value of urban trees is pretty clear to anyone who has finally reached a soothing green canopy after trudging down a hot city street, and now studies are...

Via Flora Moon
Shaun Scallan's insight:

Another similar message on the value of trees in an urban setting

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Climate change set to give us a home without the gumtrees

Climate change set to give us a home without the gumtrees | Holistic Forest Management | Scoop.it
Australia's standing as the home among the gumtrees could be challenged, with increased climate stress causing extensive change to Australia's eucalypt ecosystems.
Shaun Scallan's insight:

Gathering a perspective about the threats to habitat. It seems climate change is pretty threatening. This builds on a lot of other work done in Australia already.

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Tree loss mapped in 'near real time'

Tree loss mapped in 'near real time' | Holistic Forest Management | Scoop.it

A new global monitoring system has been launched that promises "near real time" information on deforestation around the world.

Global Forest Watch (GFW) is backed by Google and over 40 business and campaigning groups.

It uses information from hundreds of millions of satellite images as well as data from people on the ground.


Via Mariaschnee
Shaun Scallan's insight:

Good data  for  good decisions. If GFW provides full, up to date and  accurate visibility we will have the good data.

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Green Cities – Calculating the value of trees « SIMON WILD

Green Cities – Calculating the value of trees « SIMON WILD | Holistic Forest Management | Scoop.it
PEOPLE | DESIGN | TECHNOLOGY (by Simon Wild)

Via Rebecca Armstrong
Shaun Scallan's insight:

Trees have more than a dollar value.

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The Value of Urban Trees in Promoting Bird Diversity | Planetizen

A world first study explicitly demonstrates that large trees in urban parks are “keystone structures” that help provide important habitat and contribute to the richness, abundance and breeding of birds, reports Megan Doherty.

Via Flora Moon
Shaun Scallan's insight:

More value in urban habitat creation.

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The High Cost of Losing Urban Trees

The High Cost of Losing Urban Trees | Holistic Forest Management | Scoop.it
Tennessee reaps a $638 million yearly benefit from its urban trees – and an $80 billion loss if they disappeared.

Through energy savings, air and water filtering and carbon storage, the urban trees of Tennessee account for more than $638 million in benefits, according to a report [PDF] conducted by the Forest Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and released earlier this year.

The biggest savings are attributed to carbon storage, which the authors of the report value at an estimated $350 million. Collectively, the state's urban trees store about 16.9 million tons, with each ton stored worth about $20.70 to the state every year. Air and water filtration is also one of the functional benefits of urban trees, and the report estimates the value of this work at $204 million per year. The trees are credited with removing 27,100 tons of pollutants each year, including ozone, particulate matter, and sulfur dioxide. And because of the shading they provide, these urban trees are credited with saving about $66 million in energy costs annually.


Via Lauren Moss
Shaun Scallan's insight:

The urban forest is part of the forest big picture.

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WBCSD Announces Inclusive Approach to Forest Certification

WBCSD Announces Inclusive Approach to Forest Certification | Holistic Forest Management | Scoop.it
RT @GreenerMonique: .@MarketWatch: @wbcsd announces commitment to #forest certification. #sustainability #green http://t.co/41m5YhuxdD
Shaun Scallan's insight:

Support for FSC, PEFC and SFI.  the objective is responsible forest management.

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