Holidays, Festivals and Celebrations
98 views | +0 today
Follow
Holidays, Festivals and Celebrations
Stage 1: Days, holidays and events celebrated by students, their school, families in their community and other communities
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ilana Krigstein
Scoop.it!

Birthdays Around the World.pdf

Ilana Krigstein's insight:

This pdf is an online version of “Birthdays Around the World”, a book by Marilyn Greco. It explains what a birthday is and describes different children’s birthday experiences from all over the world. The United States, Russia Mexico, Japan and The Phillippines feature in the book, with each countries customs and traditions being discussed. This is what makes it an excellent resource for global education. 

This book resonates amongst children as it relates to a well-known and highly recognized celebration, birthdays. Students are able to relate to the familiarity of the celebration and are engaged by new facts and pictures. Winch (2010) states the “pleasure of the picture book and of children's literature in general is in the act of revisiting the familiar but discovering something new in the process” (p.601). This resource allows children to experience this pleasure of familiarity whilst learning new things in the process. Not only is this resource engaging and informative, it also improves children’s literacy skills. When teachers read aloud and discuss books with students, this encourages students to do more independent reading (Krashen, 2004). Hearing stories also has a direct impact on vocabulary development.

Teaching Idea:

One way of using this resource in the classroom is to project it onto a whiteboard/smartboard for all students to see. Before reading the book, there can be a class discussion about birthdays, what they are and how we celebrate them. Students should have an understanding that different countries and cultures celebrate birthdays differently. Read the book aloud to the students, pausing to let students read different sentences and discuss the pictures. Once the book has been read through, have a discussion with class. What are the similarities and differences between their birthdays and those discussed in the book. Next, split the students into five groups, one for each country in the book. Provide each group with birthday information regarding their given country. Students are to write down the key customs and traditions used in their country. Once students have sufficient information regarding their country hold your own “Birthday” celebration incorporating the different customs and traditions.  Small stalls can be set up for each country and have students bring in any items relating to their country’s celebration. This will allows students to work in teams, have a sense of responsibility and experience each country’s traditions.

 

Assessment:

Students reading  levels may be assessed as the book is read, and their understanding of the content can be determined through the class discussion. Students understanding and comprehension may be further assessed during group work, expressed through the writing of key traditions.

 

Literacy Link:

By having students read sentences throughout the book and by having a class discussion, students are reaching the English outcome RS1.6- Draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies when reading and comprehending texts. Also, by being given information and working in groups to write down important points, students are addressing the outcome TS1.1- Communicates with an increasing range of people for a variety of purposes on both familiar and introduced topics in spontaneous and structured classroom activities.

 

Numeracy Link:

A follow up teaching idea can be used to link the topic to numeracy. This can be achieved through graphing. As a class, tally which month each child has their birthday. This information can then be used to create a column graph, showing which month has the most birthdays. This can be used to address the outcome DS1.1- Gathers and organises data, displays data using column and picture graphs, and interprets the results

 

References:

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy : reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

 

Krashen, S. (2004). The power of reading: Insights from the research. Retrieved from http://teachers.saschina.org/jnordmeyer/files/2011/06/The-Power-of-Reading.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ilana Krigstein
Scoop.it!

Celebrate Winter Holidays | Scholastic.com

Celebrate Winter Holidays | Scholastic.com | Holidays, Festivals and Celebrations | Scoop.it
Discover how kids across the globe celebrate Hanukkah, Christmas, and Kwanzaa. Learn about the traditions and history of each of the holidays. Includes links to audio, clip art, recipes, and teacher's guide.
Ilana Krigstein's insight:

On this website, students are able to explore scrapbooks to learn the history and traditions behind three popular holidays: Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa. Each interactive scrapbook contains:

- A short background article about the holiday with audio

- An in-depth slideshow exploring one important tradition with audio

- An array of clickable objects to learn about popular holiday songs, foods, symbols, and rituals

- Postcards with quotes from kids around the world about their own holiday traditions with audio

- Free printable activities and recipes.

 

 

By using an interactive website such as this, educators are able to maintain dynamic interaction with the entire class, provide computer-based learning without isolating students and encourage a higher level of student interaction in both teacher-directed and group-based exchanges” (SMART Technologies Inc., 2006)

 

Teaching Idea:

Before beginning to use the site, it is important to introduce the topic. This can be done through a class discussion about holidays. Questions can include: What are some of the holidays we celebrate? Why do we celebrate these holidays? Does everyone celebrate the same holidays? Once the class has had a discussion and understands that different cultures and religions celebrate different holidays, the scrapbooks should be used.

 

When using the scrapbooks it is important to gage the ability of the students. Some classes may be capable of using the site individually, whilst others might find the technology difficult. It is therefore important to teach to a class’s individual needs.

Whether using the site with a whole class, groups or individually, a way to consolidate the students learning is through questions. Each student is given a worksheet with five questions on each holiday and they are to record their answers as the scrapbooks are looked through. This can be used as an assessment to determine their level of understanding and their comprehension skills. As a way to finish off the activity, have students create their own holiday scrapbook, using the template provided by the website. This allows students to express and share their own holiday stories. Once the scrapbooks have been finished and decorated, place them around the classroom and invite parents to come and view the scrapbooks. 

 

Assessment:

By having a class discussion, the teacher is able to assess the students’ current knowledge and understanding of the topic. Their knowledge is also assessed through the worksheet provided.

 

Literacy Link:

In firstly reading the scrapbook and then answering questions students are addressing the English outcomes RS1.6- Draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies when reading and comprehending texts and WS1.9- Plans, reviews and produces a small range of simple literary and factual texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers.  By students using technology, they are also addressing the science and technology outcome UT S1.9- Selects and uses a range of equipment, computer-based technology, materials and other resources to undertake an investigation or design task.

 

Reference:

Interactive whiteboards and learning. (2006). Improving student learning outcomes and streamlining lesson planning. Canada: SMART Technologies Inc.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ilana Krigstein
Scoop.it!

Difference Differently

Difference Differently | Holidays, Festivals and Celebrations | Scoop.it
Ilana Krigstein's insight:

This site, created by together for humanity, contains activities that allow students to explore the different communites they are part of and the special events they celebrate. The module has four key activites: my communities, special days, calendar of events and three weddings.

 

The focus of this scoop is Special days, which has two components. The first part involves students exploring events that are special to different Australian children.  There are five stories in total, each containing a small amount of information. These stories can be displayed on the interactive whiteboard while the teacher chooses children to read. This not only practices the students reading skills but also keeps them engaged. After each story the class should discuss the special day mentioned. Is it familiar to them? Do they celebrate it? What’s one interesting fact they learnt? Once all five special days have been read, have students write about an event that is special to them. Remind them to include when the event is, whom it involves, what you do and what makes it special to them. Students are also to draw a picture that represents their special event. After all students have finished, place them in groups, and have the students share their information, identifying whether all students celebrate the same days and/or events in the same way. This concludes with a class discussion of their findings.

 

Teaching Idea:

The focus of this activity is Special days, which has two components. The first part involves students exploring events that are special to different Australian children.  There are five stories in total, each containing a small amount of information. These stories can be displayed on the interactive whiteboard while the teacher chooses children to read. This not only practices the students reading skills but also keeps them engaged. After each story the class should discuss the special day mentioned. Is it familiar to them? Do they celebrate it? What’s one interesting fact they learnt? Once all five special days have been read, have students write about an event that is special to them. Remind them to include when the event is, whom it involves, what you do and what makes it special to them. Students are also to draw a picture that represents their special event. After all students have finished, place them in groups, and have the students share their information, identifying whether all students celebrate the same days and/or events and what are the similarities and differences. This concludes with a class discussion of their findings.

 

Assessment:

The students reading skills can be assessed through the class reading off the whiteboard. Their HSIE understanding and knowledge can be assessed through the class discussion and through the sentences they write about their special day.

 

Literacy Link:

A variety of literacy skills are linked in this activity, including reading and writing. These link to the English outcomes RS1.6- Draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies when reading and comprehending texts and WS1.10-Produces texts using the basic grammatical features and punctuation conventions of the text type.

 

References:

Callow, J., & Hertzberg, M. (2006). Helping children learn to read. In R. Ewing (Ed.), Beyond the reading wars:a balanced approach to helping children learn to read (pp. 44-53). Sydney: Newtown, N.S.W. : Primary English Teaching Association.

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy : reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ilana Krigstein
Scoop.it!

BrainPOP Jr. | Winter Holidays

BrainPOP Jr. | Winter Holidays | Holidays, Festivals and Celebrations | Scoop.it
Provides educational movies for K-3 students. Homework Help, leveled quizzes, games and activities for kids. Exceptional resource for teachers and homeschools.
Ilana Krigstein's insight:

The brainpop site provides an engaging and educational 5 minute animated video about winter holidays. The video discusses the holidays of Christmas, Hannukah, Kwanza and The New Year.   Before showing the video it is important for the students to understand that whilst the video describes them as winter holidays, here in Australia they take place during summer. This will help avoid any confusion.

 

When discussing the holidays, the video explains when they are celebrated, who celebrates them, why they are celebrated and some customs associated with each holiday. The video uses appealing visuals and simplistic language, whilst still incorporating important facts and information. Not only is the video informative and captivating, it is also benefical for the students learning and motivation.  By using a video, students interest, attention and motivation can be captured and maintained by the visual appeal of the program. Salintri, Smith and Clovis (2002) state sustained motivation is key to improving learning outcomes, and Smith (2000) reports that students experience an increased understanding of subject matter when it was shown visually, instead of simply being told.

 

Teaching Idea:

After viewing the video for the first time, have students fill out a retrieval chart for each holiday mentioned. The chart can include headings such as celebration, who, when, why, and special customs. As the video contains a significant amount of information, it will be useful to pause the video after each holiday and allow students to fill in what they can and discuss the answers as a class. Once the charts are complete have students in groups discuss the similarities and differences between two holidays. Ask the groups to share their responses.

Other teaching ideas are available from the brainpop website, such as games, activities, quizzes and more. These are an excellent way to consolidate the students knowledge and can be used as an a

 

Assessment:

The retrieval chart can be used as a form of assessment. This demonstrates the student’s knowledge and understanding of the information in the video. The teacher can also work around the classroom, asking the students questions, thereby demonstrating evidence of their learning.

 

Literacy Link:

By having students fill in a retrieval chart they are addressing the English outcome WS1.10- Produces texts using the basic grammatical features and punctuation conventions of the text type. 

 

References:

Salintri, G., Smith, K. & Clovis, C. (2002). The Aural Enabler: Creating a Way for Special Needs Kids to Participate in the Classroom Lesson.

 

Smith, A. (2000). Interactive Whiteboard Evaluation. Retrieved from http://www.mirandanet.ac.uk/publications/smartboard.htm

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ilana Krigstein
Scoop.it!

Celebrating NAIDOC Week | NAIDOC

Celebrating NAIDOC Week | NAIDOC | Holidays, Festivals and Celebrations | Scoop.it
Ilana Krigstein's insight:

This resource is the official website of NAIDOC. NAIDOC originally stood for “National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee”, but now stands for a week of celebrations. NAIDOC week is held around Australia every year and celebrates the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

 

Celebrating this week in the classroom allows students to acknowledge and learn about Indigenous culture and practice, and creates a sense of identity for those Indigenous students in the class itself. It is important for students to learn about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, cultures and perspectives, so they know about their country’s heritage and original inhabitants. A report released by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) found that for non-Indigenous students, learning about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and peoples leads to mutual respect, a greater understanding of cultural difference and richer knowledge of Australia’s history. For Indigenous students, evidence shows that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students’ attendance and outcomes improve when Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultures are taught. As the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation stated: “Regular schools with [an] inclusive orientation are the most effective means of combating discrimination, creating welcoming communities, building an inclusive society and achieving education for all” (2004, p. 5).

 

Teaching Ideas:

There are numerous ways NAIDOC week can be celebrated at school and in the classroom, these include :

- Each morning a flag raising ceremony being held

- Indigenous posters being displayed around the school and in classrooms

- During quiet work time Indigenous music being played in the background

- Literacy groups focusing on Indigenous books that incorporate celebrations

- During creative arts students create their own Aboriginal art, which can be displayed around the room

- Maths lessons involving graphs based on Indigenous data 

- Invite a local elder to speak at the school. Have the speaker focus on Indigenous celebrations, including life, death, corroborees and birthdays.

 

By incorporating some or all of these ideas students will learn about Indigenous culture and celebrations, whilst still respecting Australia’s history and heritage. 

 

Assessment:

The students understanding of the HSIE outcome can be assessed through class discussions and artwork. Class discussions allow students to show their understanding and knowledge, whilst improving their speaking skills. Artwork can be used to express their understanding of Indigenous culture and celebrations. 

 

References:

http://www.reconciliation.org.au/home/latest/aboriginal-perspectives-in-schools-q-a

 

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation. (2001). Including the excluded: Meeting diversity in education: Example from Romania. Paris. 

 

more...
No comment yet.