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Rescooped by Funzionario 2.0 from Black swans, risks and crisis
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The High Cost and Risk of your Projects' Unknown Unknowns

First the BAD news

All of the major project disasters of the past 30 years were overseen or ‘governed’ by otherwise competent executives who did not know what to do or how to act as their project failed.


Via Claude Emond, Philippe Vallat
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Philippe Vallat's curator insight, May 21, 2014 9:31 AM
  • Project governance is about improving the business.
  • Project governance is about managing the business to realize the business outcomes, benefits and value.
  • The primary measures of success are the full delivery of the clearly specified and measurable desired business outcomes, benefits and value.
  • The key governance role is to protect and deliver the full business value of the project. To ensure that whatever the project is doing, it is not damaging or destroying the business value.
  • The business value is only realized when the solution is fully operational.


Didier Lebouc's comment, May 22, 2014 2:25 PM
I agree on the fact that uknown unknowns are the greatest risks in a project.
Didier Lebouc's comment, May 22, 2014 2:26 PM
I totally disagree on the explanations driven by a clear separation between project (and its "governance") and business. This approach is too mechanical and not sufficiently holistic.
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Don't Be An Expert (But if Unavoidable, Be a Fox, and Use Models)

Don't Be An Expert (But if Unavoidable, Be a Fox, and Use Models) | hokusai | Scoop.it
“The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.” ~ Archilochus In 2005, Philip Tetlock published a widely acclaimed book, “Expert Political Judgment: How Good Is It? How Can We Kn...

Via Philippe Vallat
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Philippe Vallat's curator insight, February 16, 2014 3:12 PM

Ironically, the more famous the expert, the less accurate his or her predictions tended to be. The less successful forecasters tended to have one big, beautiful idea that they loved to stretch, sometimes to the breaking point. They tended to be articulate and very persuasive as to why their idea explained everything… they are more entertaining… The media loves them… Experts in demand were more overconfident than their colleagues who eked out existences far from the limelight…”