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High School Librarian, American International School - Chennai
Curated by Jenn Alevy
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If all the Ice melted: National Geographic's Interactive map on Rising Seas

If all the Ice melted: National Geographic's Interactive map on Rising Seas | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

What if all the ice melted in the world? Now whether you believe global warming happens because of human activities or naturally is another debate. The questions “How would the world look if ALL the ice melted?” How much would the sea rise by? What would be the average temperature on Earth? are of interest to everyone.

Trust National Geographic not only to capture such questions in the best manner possible but also to visualize it in such geoawesome manner! Here’s the super interesting map by National Geographic “IF ALL THE ICE MELTED“!

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, National Geographic, climate change, water, visualization.


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 5, 9:05 AM

Climate change is all about the "Pendulum Effect," where the extremes is what matters, not so much the median or average. The average may fluctuate some, but the real problem comes when the weather goes haywire. Too much water can be as destructive as too little water, and this doesn't only happen in time but in space as well, where regions get too much of one and too little of the other. We'll see strips of drought and strips of wetness, strips of cold and strips of heat, like bands across regions and across the planet. If he ice melts, the sea and fresh water strips in the ocean will keep the fresh water atop and it'll probably freeze in great bands in winter and provoke an extreme albedo effect cooling down the planet radically followed immediately by a potential mini ice age.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 5, 9:23 PM

IMpact of climate change on landforms and landscapes 

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Why Handwriting Helps You Learn | Visual.ly

Why Handwriting Helps You Learn | Visual.ly | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

" Nowadays, it's less about putting pen to paper and more about turning on your laptop. But are we losing about by letting the art of penmanship die?"


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 21, 6:24 AM

Cursive writing? Should we teach it or not? Many states are still requiring cursive writing be taught, but it is not part of the Common Core. This infographic provides information about why it is important that students learn cursive.

Bart van Maanen's curator insight, February 21, 10:17 AM

Uit onderzoek is gebleken dat leerlingen lesstof beter opnemen als ze handgeschreven notities maken. Gewoon leren schrijven en het ontwikkelen van je handschrift blijft dus van groot belang.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, February 21, 5:48 PM

Thanks Beth Dichter

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The Science behind Google Earth

The Science behind Google Earth | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"Google is using a new technology to automatically generate  3D buildings from 45-degree angle aerial photography made by overlapping passes of aircraft.  The aerial photos are combined to create 3D models."


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Annenkov's curator insight, April 16, 2014 12:46 AM

This technology of visualization I would name "3D landscape"

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 16, 2014 8:40 PM

Tecnología para generar imágenes en 3D con Google Earth

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:06 PM

Google Earth has made the Earth easier to decipher and examine in a geographical sense of location and place by being able to see multiple layers. This article goes into the 3D designs and usage of aerial photography to create 3D images.

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Why games are good for learning?

Why games are good for learning? | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

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Francesco G. Lamacchia's curator insight, November 21, 2013 11:48 AM

Giocando....s'impara! 

Julio Cirnes's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:46 PM

Please teacher, more games!

Ryan McDonough's curator insight, July 7, 2014 8:19 AM

Self explanatory visual on the benefits of gaming as a means of learning. Outlined are the rewards, mastery, engagement, intensity, exercise, readiness, and competitiveness. These types of graphics need to be displayed in the classroom. There's always parents who are unsure of how gaming qualifies as teaching. Can't they just sit their kid in front of an iPad all day at home? Well, in the appropriate setting, with the right direction and guidance, games are certainly good for learning. Some people just don't know that from experience yet.

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20 Reflective Questions To Help Students Respond To Common Core Texts

20 Reflective Questions To Help Students Respond To Common Core Texts | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"The Common Core Standards represent a shift in the traditional instruction of English-Language Arts in the average American public school K-12 classroom. While there are several differences in the new standards, one of the most interesting (in addition to the expectation of technology integration) is the trend from literary to non-fiction texts."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 1, 2013 7:05 PM

This could be used as a great anchor chart for students to see when when reading text and preparing to respond to the text. Although the title says 20 questions I count 21 questions on this visual, questions that are require critical thinking skills, questions that may be used with a variety of texts (as required by Common Core).

The questions are in three categories (information below quoted from the article):

* Within the text - summaries, sequence of events, conflict/resolution, etc

* Beyond the text - Inferencing, implicit ideas, evaluation, etc.

* About the text - Author purpose, author style, characterization, etc.

The post also relates the areas to Bloom's Taxonomy. You might also look at the question relative to Depth of Knowledge.

Charlie Dare's curator insight, August 3, 2013 4:45 AM

Critical thinking about your story line ~

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Luminous Cities: A New Mapping Project Shows How Events are Tied to Place

Luminous Cities: A New Mapping Project Shows How Events are Tied to Place | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

Take a look at a set of maps that tell encoded stories of politics, natural disasters and social movements.


There are many nice Flickr visualizations of global cities but never anything quite this comprehensive across space and time: Meet Luminous Cities, a creation of the London-based mapping and digital arts firm TraceMedia, built with support from the Centre for Spatial Analysis & Policy at the University of Leeds and the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

The project is trying to "uncover the archeology of data traces left by social media" in cities across the globe...


Via Lauren Moss
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What Is Visualization?

What Is Visualization? | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

This seems like a straightforward question, but it’s proven to be a difficult one to answer. Even visualization researchers don’t have a clear definition.

 

Is it synonymous with information graphics? Does visualization have to be computer generated? Does data have to be involved, or can it be abstract? The answers vary depending on who you ask.

 

Visualization is a medium. It’s not just an analysis tool nor just a way to prove a point more clearly through data.


Visualization is like books. There are different writing styles and categories, there are textbooks and there are novels, and they communicate ideas in different ways for varied purposes. And just like authors who use words to communicate, there are rules that you should always follow and others that are guidelines that you can bend and break...


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Fàtima Galan's curator insight, September 12, 2013 6:50 AM

"Visualization is like books. There are different writing styles and categories, there are textbooks and there are novels, and they communicate ideas in different ways for varied purposes. "

Patrice Mitrano's curator insight, January 30, 2014 5:16 AM

De très nombreux exemples d'infographies, malheureusement pas toujours aboutis. A croiser avec d'autres infographies ou représentations sur des sujets identiques ou bien à rapprocher des données sources.

Sang Lee's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:57 PM

Visualization

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200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized

200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"Where have immigrants to the U.S. come from? Natalia Bronshtein, a professor and consultant who runs the blog Insightful Interaction, created this fascinating visualization of the number of immigrants to the U.S. since 1829 by country of origin.  The graph hints at tragic events in world history. The first influx of Irish occurred during the potato famine in 1845, while the massive influx of Russians in the first decade of the 20th Century was driven by anti-Semitic violence of the Russian pogroms (riots). Meanwhile in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, army conscription and the forced assimilation of minority groups drove people to the U.S. in the early 1900s.  Since WWII, Central and South America and Asia have replaced Europe as the largest source of immigrants to the U.S. Immigration shrunk to almost nothing as restrictions tightened during WWII, and then gradually expanded to reach its largest extent ever in the first decade of the 21st Century."

 

Tags: migration, historical, USA, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
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Olivier Tabary's curator insight, March 25, 4:20 PM

Quite impressive new graphic approach to cope with immigration flows in the USA

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, April 8, 7:34 PM

These beautiful waves of color tell the amazing immigration history of the United States. The influxes of people tell some tragic stories of world history and about refugees coming into the states. I am also including the interactive version here:

http://insightfulinteraction.com/immigration200years.html

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 22, 6:37 PM

Current theme! 200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized | @scoopit via @ProfessorDixon http://sco.lt/...

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Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 10:47 AM

APHG-U3

wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stran smith's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

Rescooped by Jenn Alevy from 21st Century Information Fluency
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Visual Music Search Engine

Visual Music Search Engine | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
Search for musical artists and discover similar singers and bands you never knew existed.

 

Welcome to MusicPlasma.com the original visual music mapping tool.  Music Plasma is a visual search service that allows music lovers to discover new bands and artists that are closely related to their favorites.  Our graphic interface lets you visualize how the groups are fused together. Just enter your favorite musical artist in the search bar below. A circle will appear on the music map. Click on it and chose expand to explore.


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, February 28, 2014 7:34 PM

Would students be more interested in learning how to search if they could be delving into music?

Charlie Dare's curator insight, March 2, 2014 11:55 PM

Maybe more interested in learning how to search if they could be delving into music?

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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 2014 5:09 PM

These maps are a great way to see what North American cities used to look like in comparison to what they are now. Some great transformations are Chicago and NYC.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 9, 2:15 PM

Fantastic collection!

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Here's What Wi-Fi Would Look Like If We Could See It

Here's What Wi-Fi Would Look Like If We Could See It | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

Wi-fi. It's all around us, quietly and invisibly powering our access to the world's information. But few of us have a sense of what wi-fi actually is, let alone what it would look like if we could see it. Artist Nickolay Lamm decided to shed some light on the subject. He created visualizations that imagine the size, shape, and color of wi-fi signals were they visible to the human eye. 

"I feel that by showing what wi-fi would look like if we could see it, we'd appreciate the technology that we use everyday," Lamm told me in an email. "A lot of us use technology without appreciating the complexity behind making it work."  

To estimate what this would look like, Lamm worked with M. Browning Vogel, Ph.D., an astrobiologist and former employee at NASA Ames. Dr. Vogel described the science behind wireless technology, and Lamm used the information to create the visualizations.


Via Lauren Moss
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All You Need to Know About Infographics: Tips, Tutorials, Guides

All You Need to Know About Infographics: Tips, Tutorials, Guides | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

Let’s be honest, we don’t like to read big pieces of text. Text-heavy graphs are rather difficult for understanding, especially when dealing with numbers and statistics. That is why illustrations and flowcharts are often used for such kind of information.

An infographic, or a visual representation of study or data, like anything else, can be done right or wrong. How to create a successful infographic? A good idea and a good design.

 

Stop by the link for more on what defines an infographic, what contributes to its popularity, as well as the various types of infographics and references for tutorials and best practices.

 

Additional topics covered include:

The major parts of an infographicHow to create an infographicDeveloping ideas & organizing dataResearch & sourcesTypography, graphics & colorFacts & conclusionsDesigning & Editing
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HC's curator insight, April 30, 2014 9:26 PM

Some good tips here...