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High School Librarian, American International School - Chennai
Curated by Jenn Alevy
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ISTE Infographic: Ready, set, blend!

ISTE Infographic: Ready, set, blend! | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
The basic cognitive skills needed by previous generations are no longer enough. Students in the conceptual age must also master the higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy and Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, including creation, metacognition and self-actualization.

“It will require an upgrade to our curriculum, new instructional methods and materials, a new profile of a global graduate and an open mind,” say Smith, Chavez and Seaman.

For ideas about how to re-create your classroom for the conceptual age, including potential classroom setups, blended learning models to mix and match, and a curriculum design process, take a look at the infographic

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, February 10, 2015 11:55 AM

Big fan of info graphics! 

Suzanne's curator insight, February 11, 2015 7:53 AM

Learning and teaching in the conceptual age.

Ricard Garcia's curator insight, February 12, 2015 2:24 AM

How to implement a new classroom and learning paradigm: A nice outline

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A Study of Best Practices for Online Courses based on Marzano

A Study of Best Practices for Online Courses based on Marzano | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 6, 2014 1:29 PM

Many schools are exploring online instruction as a component of education (including K-12). If you are interested in learning how one organization (edmentum) had the Marzano Research Laboratory review "the impact of strategies on student academic outcomes in an online learning environment." The report explores best practices in three areas:

* Marzano Dimension: Strategies Involving Routine Events - This area covers six best practices, including

  * Communicating course /assignment rules and procedures

  * Allowing students to keep track of their learning progress

* Marzano Dimension: Strategies Enacted on the Spot - This area also discusses six best practices, including:

  * Providing help to understand and practice new knowledge

  * Allowing students to ask questions during online course/assignment

* Marzano Dimension: Strategies Addressing Content - This area has only one practice: 

 * Adding external resources to assignments aligned to local objectives

There is a page devoted to each of the best practices. This information may not be new to you, but if teaching online is new to you there are great suggestions to help you design a course (or teach a course) that will lead to a more successful implementation. 

The link to this file is located at:  http://www.edmentum.com/sites/edmentum.com/files/resource/media/0317-01%20Marzano_eBook.pdf 

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Teaching Students How to Research for Understanding with Technology

Teaching Students How to Research for Understanding with Technology | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
Searching for information on the Internet can be extremely challenging for our students. This is widely due to the sheer amount of information that is currently available out there. A lot of teache...

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 1, 2014 8:58 PM

You assign students a research project. Many students go to Google, type in a question (without giving much thought), and often become overwhelmed with the amount of information available. Is this a familiar scene?

Think back and make one change, instead of using Google have them use a database? Is that a significant shift?

This post provides a series of steps, taking you through a number of ways you might proceed with a research project and adding in complexity. Scheer begins by explaining a common research project and moves on through a number of areas:

* What is understanding?

* Understanding Searching with Technology

* Stages of Research

* Putting This All Together

* Conclusion

Do you have your students do research projects? Do you find that you are not satisfied with the quality of work being done? This post provides an excellent foundation to help you revamp your process and provide your students with skills that they will use not only in the classroom but also in the future, in both their personal and professional endeavors.

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, April 7, 2014 2:20 PM

Re-framing the stages of research to help students manage the volume of information on databases and the internet.

PLAN – Identify what the problem is and the questions that you are going to ask.

STRATEGIZE – The route that you are going to take to search the web for information about your questions.

EVALUATE –  The sources of data that you are  using for credibility, accuracy and currentness.

TRIANGULATE – Compare your sources of data against one other.

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What do your stakeholders know about school library programs?


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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, February 27, 2014 6:28 PM

Even though there is substantial evidence about the significant benefits of school libraries it is often ignored and dismissed.

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Hattie's Index Of Teaching & Learning Strategies

Hattie's Index Of Teaching & Learning Strategies | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

Quoting from the post:

Statistically speaking, the strength of the relationship between two variables. John Hattie, Professor of Education and Director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne, Australia, says ‘effect sizes’ are the best way of answering the question ‘what has the greatest influence on student learning?’


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 26, 2014 7:26 PM

So the question is, what does research tell us are the best teaching and learning strategies? This list, from John Hattie's research, provides insight into this question.

After an introduction that describes how the effect size is applied and the cautions that must be observed, there is a short section that discusses how you might apply this data...and then there are six scrollable pages where the data is shared. There is also a list of of the 39 strategies that is to the point. The scrollable list provides additional insights for better understands.

What is least successful? Retention.

What is most successful? Teacher credibility in the eyes of the student.

This post is worth reading, and reading again. The strategies may not be new to you, but as you read through the research you may choose one or two to work on as this school year continues.

Ryan Sines's curator insight, September 2, 2014 1:47 PM

Can't get enough Hattie!

Ching Rem's curator insight, September 19, 2014 5:32 AM

why not?

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A Visual Guide to Generation Z

A Visual Guide to Generation Z | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

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Ennio Martignago's curator insight, November 28, 2013 3:37 AM

Generazione Z

Beatriz Montesinos's curator insight, November 28, 2013 5:42 AM

Excelente estudio sociólogico de la Generación Z (niñ@s nacidos entre 1995 y 2009) realizado por la empresa australiana McCrindle.

Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, November 28, 2013 4:24 PM

for kids

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The Power of the Educational Infographic

The Power of the Educational Infographic | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:48 PM

Have you had people ask you why you choose to use infographics in your classroom? This presentation is by Mia MacMeekin, who has created many great infographics (some of which have been posted on this Sccop.it). The best way to access this is in PDF format. This file is quite large so here is a direct link to it: http://anethicalisland.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/rscon-presentation-22.pdf

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Back to School with Google Docs: Support Research/Writing/ Collaboration

Back to School with Google Docs: Support Research/Writing/ Collaboration | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 19, 2013 6:24 AM

Are you using Google Docs? This post explores many of the options available to you in Google Docs including:

* Google Docs for Research - Look under Tools to access Research. As well as allowing you to research within Google Docs this tool streamlines " the process of creating hyperlinks and appropriately formatting citations."

* Google Docs for Collaborative Writing - Some of the features of this tool include sharing and commenting, built-in dictionary, smart spell check and grammar check, one click footnotes and citations, Easy Bib connection and revision history.

The Common Core stresses the need for students to collaborate. Google Docs may assist your students in the process. The post also contains quite a few screenshots.

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, August 19, 2013 3:10 PM

Looks like an easy and interesting way to promote good research skills in the classroom!

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Clip, Annotate, Markup and Permanently Archive Any Web Page with Scrible

Clip, Annotate, Markup and Permanently Archive Any Web Page with Scrible | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
scrible lets you highlight and annotate web pages and easily save, share and collaborate on your web research with others. Sign up for free!

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SLRE's curator insight, August 2, 2013 6:45 AM

Handig app om dingen die je op het web tegenkomt van aantekeningen te voorzien en te bewaren.

wanderingsalsero's curator insight, October 20, 2013 7:54 PM

I haven't read this article but I'm seriously interested in the question implied in the title.....i.e. how to 'mark up' information and get them on the web.  In many cases, I think that's adequate for most people's purpose.

 

I have yet to find a tool that I found really comfortable for doing that.  Maybe this is it.

יפה בן-דרור's curator insight, June 22, 2014 9:12 AM

CROCODOC

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmWcWbGnpt4

 

A.NNOTATE

 

מגוון של תכניות להערות על PDF

http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/top-web-annotation-and-markup-tools/

 

 

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Web 2.0 Annotation and Bookmarking Tools: A Quick Guide

Selected 10 annotation and bookmarking tools

 

 


Via Judy O'Connell, Joyce Valenza, Dennis T OConnor
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Chanelle Savich's curator insight, January 28, 2013 10:46 PM

Thorough guide with step by step installation instructions as well as information about what differentiates each tool from the others. 

Sandra V. Barbosa's comment, January 29, 2013 12:53 AM
Visit me also at scoop.it http://www.scoop.it/t/english-language-and-literature-for-native-portuguese-language .Thanks, Paulo Faria.
Mita Jordan's curator insight, January 29, 2013 4:33 PM

Web 2.0, Annotation and Bookmarking tools

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How Teens Do Research in the Digital World | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

How Teens Do Research in the Digital World | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
A survey of Advanced Placement and National Writing Project teachers finds that teens’ research habits are changing in the digital age...

Via Joyce Valenza, Dennis T OConnor
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A shocking statistic about the quality of education research

A shocking statistic about the quality of education research | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
A research study about research studies comes up with a cautionary finding.

 

For more than a decade, school reformers have said that education policy should be driven by “research” and “data,” but there’s a big question about how much faith anyone should have in a great deal of education research. This is so not only because the samples are too small or because some research projects are funded by specific companies looking for specific results, but because in nearly all cases, it appears that nobody can be certain their results are completely accurate.


“I would love to believe that every single person doing education research around the world has ethics that are as pure as the driven snow,” Plucker said. “[But] the law of averages tells us there’s something out there.”



Via Gust MEES
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 22, 2014 6:32 PM

The concept of replication has never made sense to me. We should be reproducing and reconstructing. Reproducing and reconstructing are not about identical. They are about checking more data against the original data collected. One can never replicate/duplicate the same situation so it is about similarities rather than exactness.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, August 23, 2014 11:42 AM

This article is about the low value placed on replication studies. It does not call into question all education research! I'd like to see how this replication issue compares to other social sciences before dismissing all ed research! 

Dylan-oliver Sinclair's curator insight, August 24, 2014 10:48 PM

What information should be taught in schools and universities? This topic is suggesting marketing companies have influence over learning and teaching.

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Common Craft Explains Primary and Secondary Sources

Common Craft Explains Primary and Secondary Sources | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"Understanding the differences between primary and secondary sources can be a challenge to some middle school and high school students. "


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 1, 2014 9:10 PM

Help your student learn the differences between primary and seconary sources by sharing this video by Common Craft. What makes primary resources important? When it is better to use secondary resources? How to they interact with each other? This two minute video will provide an overview that will help your students deepen their understanding. 

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A Message From Your Brain: I'm Not Good At Remembering What I Hear

A Message From Your Brain: I'm Not Good At Remembering What I Hear | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"A new study shows that we are far better at remembering what we see and touch than what we hear."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 12, 2014 9:16 PM

How do we learn best? This is a critical question for educators to understand and to keep up-to-date with research, and this post from the National Geographic looks at new research that shows that our auditory memory is not as robust as our visual and tactile memory.

Much more information is available in the post but the shorthand is that having students engage as many senses as possible is the best way for us to reach our learners!

David Baker's curator insight, March 13, 2014 4:33 PM

Important to remember that we structure classrooms to support learning.

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What do your stakeholders know about school library programs?


Via Karen Bonanno, Dennis T OConnor
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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, February 27, 2014 6:28 PM

Even though there is substantial evidence about the significant benefits of school libraries it is often ignored and dismissed.

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Why is My Teen So Forgetful?

Why is My Teen So Forgetful? | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
David Wilcox, of Musings on the Middle Years of Education, and I have worked together to create an infographic about the teen brain. It is based on a blog post he wrote over a year ago (Click here ...

Via Beth Dichter
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deni tafe library's curator insight, December 4, 2013 4:57 PM

Some relevance for teeenage students

Audrey's curator insight, December 5, 2013 3:24 PM

Thanks for this Beth.  I will add this to my tutorials for students.  It is very helpful, Audrey.  Also have a look at www.hotmoodle.com.

David Baker's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:01 AM

I plan to share this at the School Accountability meeting I am chairing next week.  We have a standing agenda item - the middle school student.  This is a great resource and in a great format to start conversations at school and home.

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Fine-Tune Your Google Searches To Find Exactly What You Need: The 10 Search Modifiers You Must Know By Heart

Fine-Tune Your Google Searches To Find Exactly What You Need: The 10 Search Modifiers You Must Know By Heart | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

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Conrad Albertson's comment, November 5, 2013 9:22 AM
Maureen, I agree. Google does use AND as the default. In their defense, I believe the confusion is because not all searches do. Some still use OR. Check out this article about this person disappointed when a different search did not work until they used Google http://meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/22388/why-or-operator-by-default-in-search
Elsie Whitelock's curator insight, November 17, 2013 10:34 AM

Some google search modifiers to help focus your search

Andrew Lambert's curator insight, August 12, 2014 9:13 AM

Great shortcuts

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Smithsonian Finds E-readers Makes Reading Easier for Those with Dyslexia

Smithsonian Finds E-readers Makes Reading Easier for Those with Dyslexia | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"As e-readers grow in popularity as convenient alternatives to traditional books, researchers at the Smithsonian have found that convenience may not be their only benefit. The team discovered that when e-readers are set up to display only a few words per line, some people with dyslexia can read more easily, quickly and with greater comprehension."


Via Beth Dichter
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Heather MacDonald's curator insight, September 23, 2013 11:20 AM

I love these kinds of advances.  For those of us who know of people who've struggled with language learning challenges this is a great discovery. Language leaning problems create way too many other personal and social problems for children who then grow to be adults with problems unless they are diagnosed and helped.

Way to go Smithsonian researchers!

Sharla Shults's curator insight, October 2, 2013 5:41 PM

The wonders of modern technology never cease!

LS5043-2014's curator insight, November 6, 2014 6:34 PM

Important evidence re: usefulness of e-readers to underserved library populations.

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Clip, Annotate, Markup and Permanently Archive Any Web Page with Scribble

Clip, Annotate, Markup and Permanently Archive Any Web Page with Scribble | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
scrible lets you highlight and annotate web pages and easily save, share and collaborate on your web research with others. Sign up for free!

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SLRE's curator insight, August 2, 2013 6:45 AM

Handig app om dingen die je op het web tegenkomt van aantekeningen te voorzien en te bewaren.

wanderingsalsero's curator insight, October 20, 2013 7:54 PM

I haven't read this article but I'm seriously interested in the question implied in the title.....i.e. how to 'mark up' information and get them on the web.  In many cases, I think that's adequate for most people's purpose.

 

I have yet to find a tool that I found really comfortable for doing that.  Maybe this is it.

יפה בן-דרור's curator insight, June 22, 2014 9:12 AM

CROCODOC

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmWcWbGnpt4

 

A.NNOTATE

 

מגוון של תכניות להערות על PDF

http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/top-web-annotation-and-markup-tools/

 

 

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Have Your Teachers Banned Wikipedia? They Must Not Know About This.

Have Your Teachers Banned Wikipedia? They Must Not Know About This. | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
Wikipedia's most common sources of information are news outlets, books, and academic archives. So if your teacher has banned Wikipedia, just follow Wikipedia's trail of sources to get to the good stuff. Oh, and don't tell them we sent you.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Deborah Owen's curator insight, May 7, 2013 8:12 AM

Hmmm... Worth knowing about. Still can't cite it, but a good place to start for background info.

Sarah Rach-Sovich's curator insight, May 7, 2013 9:06 AM

A great starting point - track it back to see where it might have come from.

Lorena Swetnam's curator insight, May 7, 2013 9:43 AM

Teach students and teachers how Wikipedia can be a starting point in the research process, not the final destination. 

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The CRAP test in action - Guide for Student Research (Portland State)

The CRAP test in action - Guide for Student Research (Portland State) | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

The CRAP test: Currency, Reliability, Authority, and Purpose/ Point of view is a simple and memorable way to help students evaluate sources for their research. This page from the Portland State University Library has two short videos that demonstrate the CRAP test being used to evaluate websites and articles. 

 

Here's a PDF overview of the CRAP test, with a list of questions to ask about the source to evaluate it: http://www.library.vanderbilt.edu/central/Soc/crap.pdf


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The 6 Best Online Bibliography Tools

The 6 Best Online Bibliography Tools | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
If helping your students write papers is a part of your school day, you probably already know that there are enough issues to focus on without having to spend a lot of time teaching your students how to build a bibliography and correctly cite their sources. Your time is likely better spent helping create a focused, concise piece of work that uses excellent grammar and sentence structure.

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