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High School Librarian, American International School - Chennai
Curated by Jenn Alevy
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Rescooped by Jenn Alevy from 21st Century Information Fluency
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Citing Sources - QUEST - the District 155 Research Model - LibGuides at Community High School District 155

Citing Sources - QUEST - the District 155 Research Model - LibGuides at Community High School District 155 | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
LibGuides. QUEST - the District 155 Research Model. Citing Sources.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, February 26, 7:30 PM

I enjoyed the lead off video of various speakers (students and teachers?) explaining plagiarism in their own words. 


As always, citation is the solution.

Rescooped by Jenn Alevy from Eclectic Technology
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Four Helpful Web Search Strategy Tutorials

Four Helpful Web Search Strategy Tutorials | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"Vaughn Memorial Library at Acadia University hosts four free animated tutorials designed to teach lessons on web research strategies. The four tutorials are Credible Sources Count, Research It Right, Searching With Success, and You Quote It, You Note It."


Via Beth Dichter
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Dean Mantz's curator insight, September 22, 2013 8:29 PM

This is a helpful share from Richard Byrne's site Free Tech 4 Teachers.  I encourage all educators to add this resource site to aid in the development/strenthening of student searching skills. 

Sue Alexander's curator insight, September 23, 2013 9:28 AM

just can't have too many tools in our 1:1 toolbox. These are aimed at intermediate and middle grades. Thanks Beth for another helpful Scoop!

Lynne Kemmer's comment, September 25, 2013 2:55 PM
Excellent!!
Rescooped by Jenn Alevy from 21st Century Information Fluency
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Plagiarism and the link: How the web makes attribution easier -- and more complicated

Plagiarism and the link: How the web makes attribution easier -- and more complicated | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
The controversy over writer Nate Thayer’s failure to credit his sources, which some alleged amounted to plagiarism, is just part of an ongoing debate over how we use — and give credit for — information in a digital age.


The problem is that while adding hyperlinks is a great way of avoiding a charge of plagiarism — something that might have helped Fox News opinion writer Juan Williams and other alleged plagiarists — there is no accepted protocol for how or where to add those links, or how much content someone can cut and paste into their story or blog post without crossing the line from borrowing into plagiarism or copyright infringement.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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reuvenwerber's curator insight, April 11, 2013 1:29 AM

Is a link enough for attribution?

Paige Jaeger 's comment, April 11, 2013 8:31 AM
As a hyperlink embedder, this is a timely post for introspection! Everyone should stop, read, and contemplate whether they are remaining true to the source. I'd like to think I have been, but it's time to reflect and inspect!
Sandra Carswell's curator insight, April 11, 2013 11:58 PM

This is also an important topic for librarians to address. We teach our students to cite sources and give attribution to the creators of materials they use in their projects. Is a link enough? And yes, just how much can you quote without losing your own voice? 

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Plagiarism vs. Collaboration on Education’s Digital Frontier

Plagiarism vs. Collaboration on Education’s Digital Frontier | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
Instead of focusing our concerns on technology as an aid to plagiarizers, we should focus on its ability to foster creativity and collaboration, says Jen Carey.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 1, 3:10 PM

As teachers we know how easy it is for students to plagiarize today. We are asked to have students work collaboratively and use tools where students may see others thoughts. How to we deal with these issues, the need for collaboration and using tools which promote this and the issue of students plagiarizing? And when it comes to assessment how do we ask students to collaborate yet also demand that they not plagiarize?

This post explores these issues and discusses how to "transform cheating into collaboration"?  There is also a question that each of us might ask ourselves (and I suspect many of us have): If you can Google an answer is it a good question for an assessment?

 

Rescooped by Jenn Alevy from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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From Texting to Plagiarism, How to Stop High-Tech Cheating -- THE Journal

From Texting to Plagiarism, How to Stop High-Tech Cheating -- THE Journal | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
With the proliferation of mobile devices and instant access to the internet, cheating has become easier than ever. What can educators do to stop it?

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Phillip Heath's comment, August 24, 2013 8:16 AM
ethical conduct in a virtual work one of the important attributes of 21st century
mixmaxmin's curator insight, December 20, 2013 3:46 PM

Probably the better question to ask is why do people cheat?