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High School Librarian, American International School - Chennai
Curated by Jenn Alevy
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How The Activity Learning Theory Works

How The Activity Learning Theory Works | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
How The Activity Learning Theory Works 

Vygotsky’s earlier concept of mediation, which encompassed learning alongside others (Zone of Proximal Development) and through interaction with artifacts, was the basis for Engeström’s version of Activity Theory (known as Scandinavian Activity Theory). Engeström’s approach was to explain human thought processes not simply on the basis of the individual, but in the wider context of the individual’s interactions within the social world through artifacts, and specifically in situations where activities were being produced.

In Activity Theory people (actors) use external tools (e.g. hammer, computer, car) and internal tools (e.g. plans, cognitive maps) to achieve their goals. In the social world there are many artifacts, which are seen not only as objects, but also as things that are embedded within culture, with the result that every object has cultural and/or social significance.

Tools (which can limit or enable) can also be brought to bear on the mediation of social interaction, and they influence both the behavior of the actors (those who use the tools) and also the social structure within which the actors exist (the environment, tools, artifacts). For further reading, here is Engeström’s own overview of 3 Generations of Activity Theory development. The first figure shows Second Generation AT as it is usually presented in the literature.

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Giacomo Bono's curator insight, April 1, 2015 12:46 PM

Social interactions with close others, technology, and our motivation to master environments all work together to change us. An important process not represented in this otherwise cool model is close relationships with older peers and adults (i.e., community) who know kids and the learning task at hand well enough to use the ZPD to support their learning.

HC's curator insight, April 1, 2015 7:08 PM

An interesting article on the Activity Theory where "people (actors) use external tools (e.g. hammer, computer, car) and internal tools (e.g. plans, cognitive maps) to achieve their goals." This article explores how this theory can be applied in education, "...teachers should be aware that everything in the classroom has a cultural and social meaning. " 

Kim Flintoff's curator insight, April 1, 2015 7:15 PM

A useful framework that can move well into higher education to inform learning design.

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Pedagogy comes first | Co-inventing the Curriculum | LEARNing To LEARN

Pedagogy comes first | Co-inventing the Curriculum | LEARNing To LEARN | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

Student empowerment is the strongest connective theme through the 55 posts and interviews I’ve conducted for this blog.  The educators I’ve interviewed all have one characteristic in common: they all enable students to take more control over and responsibility for their own learning.

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Learn more:

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

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https://gustmees.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/practice-21st-century-assessment-flowchart-page2-pdf.pdf

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/practice-learning-to-learn-example-2/

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

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RESENTICE's curator insight, March 6, 2015 8:09 AM

Le numérique au service de la pédagogie... 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 19, 2015 9:59 PM

Curriculum-as-lived and currere are not new ideas. They have been forming for the last 40 years plus. We did not need digital technologies to come with this idea. It should have been firmly entrenched and it is not. 

 

@ivon_ehd1

Audrey's curator insight, April 3, 2015 2:51 PM

Absolutely agree, students who take responsibility for their learning do so much better when taking exams.  In addition, when  a student can teach you and put forward their own evaluative commentary, they are ready for university.

Audrey for http://www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

www.hotmoodle.com

 

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Not Just Group Work -- Productive Group Work!

Not Just Group Work -- Productive Group Work! | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
To ensure productive group work, teachers must communicate expectations, strategically build groups, structure activities, scaffold work with a supportive classroom culture, and stress individual accountability.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 30, 2014 10:40 AM

Without forgetting the relational nature of learning and teaching. Is it accountability or responsibility? Or is it a combining both? Judith Butler speaks about giving an account of one's self which is the way we respond and are responsible for learning.

 

 

@ivon_ehd1

ma. isabel olguín vega's curator insight, September 30, 2014 6:37 PM

grupo de trabajo productivo en el aula  @barbirimoo

Quran Coaching's curator insight, October 1, 2014 3:21 AM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

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How to Infuse Digital Literacy Throughout the Curriculum

How to Infuse Digital Literacy Throughout the Curriculum | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"So how are we doing on the push to teach “digital literacy” across the K12 school spectrum? From my perspective as a school-based technology coach and history teacher, I’d say not as well as we might wish – in part because our traditional approach to curriculum and instruction wants to sort everything into its place."

 


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 27, 2014 9:14 PM

How often have you heard the term digital native or digital immigrant? Are our students digital natives because they were born after digital items were widely available? Does this factor mean that they understand how to use these tools effectively and that they are digitally literate? For me the answer to that is that they do not fully understand how to use digital tools effectively and they are not digitally literate. This is something we need to teach them.

This post does an excellent job looking at this issue. Specifically it looks at these areas:

* Students must learn how to evaluate online content - Think of this as a research skill.

* Students must be able to engage with others online and communicate - Think of this as a communication tool.

* Students need to learn how to create and projects can be digital.

These three areas come together and create the skill sets needed to digitally literate. More information is available about this in the post.

And if you happen to live in the New England area you might consider checking out the Massachusetts New Literacies Institute that will be taking place in at the Kittredge Center in Holyoke, MA from July 8 - 10. Information for this may be found at http://mnli.org/. This institute looks at three cornerstones: Online Content Reading, Online Collaborative Inquiry and Online Content Construction "preparing future-ready teachers."

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, October 25, 2014 10:42 AM

A very interesting article that examines whether digital literacy is a surface approach, or something understood clearly by students. I think we could do it a little better, and this involves some extra awareness of these teaching moments when they arrive! For instance, I use the first presentation-style assignment for my Year 7s to teach about plagiarism and referencing online sources. 

Julie Hogarth's curator insight, November 4, 2014 9:09 PM

Digital Literacy should be integrated into every day curriculum to be effectively instilled into student thinking and behavior.

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Plagiarism vs. Collaboration on Education’s Digital Frontier

Plagiarism vs. Collaboration on Education’s Digital Frontier | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
Instead of focusing our concerns on technology as an aid to plagiarizers, we should focus on its ability to foster creativity and collaboration, says Jen Carey.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 1, 2014 3:10 PM

As teachers we know how easy it is for students to plagiarize today. We are asked to have students work collaboratively and use tools where students may see others thoughts. How to we deal with these issues, the need for collaboration and using tools which promote this and the issue of students plagiarizing? And when it comes to assessment how do we ask students to collaborate yet also demand that they not plagiarize?

This post explores these issues and discusses how to "transform cheating into collaboration"?  There is also a question that each of us might ask ourselves (and I suspect many of us have): If you can Google an answer is it a good question for an assessment?

 

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Why It's Time To Start Teaching Students How To Think - Edudemic

Why It's Time To Start Teaching Students How To Think - Edudemic | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
As an elementary teacher, I can’t help but notice that children today want quick answers and do not take the time to think things through.

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Carolyn Williams's curator insight, August 26, 2013 4:57 AM

Making it Fun!

Kymberley Pelky's curator insight, August 26, 2013 3:12 PM

In an age where children expect everything to be instant, their responses become the same without taking time to process the information first.

Becky Mowat's comment, August 26, 2013 9:48 PM
Analysis and synthesis take time...and are critical to problem solving, as we all know. How to teach these higher level thinking processes is key to helping students become successful independent learners.
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Challenges of future teaching and learning | EDUcation CHANGE

Challenges of future teaching and learning | EDUcation CHANGE | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

Learn more:

 

http://www.ima-zlw-ifu.rwth-aachen.de/fileadmin/user_upload/INSTITUTSCLUSTER/Publikation_Medien/Vortraege/download//DHV_Tag_25Maerz2014.pdf


Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=EDUcation+4.0

 

 


 


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Guidelines for Designing Professional Development

Guidelines for Designing Professional Development | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
I'm in the midst of planning massive set of upcoming workshops, institutes and trainings.

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 
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Collaborate & Curate

This is "Collaborate & Curate" by langwitches on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Collaboration

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Curation

 


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objectplace's curator insight, May 13, 2014 10:41 AM

what goes where curation

Steven Kouts's curator insight, May 13, 2014 9:16 PM

love the idea

Ludmila Smirnova's curator insight, May 14, 2014 3:32 PM

This is what education is all about in this time and age!

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Collaboration Matters

Collaboration Matters | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

Blogger's note: This post focuses on the importance of integrating collaboration into classroom practice. In my next post, I'll talk about strategies for successful facilitation of collaborative work...

 

Learning is a social process, and the learning process is deepened when ideas are challenged and learners are pushed to produce work that surpasses their expectations of what they can do.

 

That said, working in groups is a continually challenging process. It is important that students aren't forced to work together on projects where collaboration isn't necessary or beneficial to the final product.

 

 


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 22, 2014 11:49 PM

I like the image with two students have a conversation without a screen. It can be done with digital technology, but the tried and true is good for students. It humanizes the other in what is often a virtual world.

Epict Italia's curator insight, January 23, 2014 5:00 AM

Idee da prendere:

1) le categorie proposte per il peer review (utilizziamole!!) - https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B3Mx1_-3IZ7tRXkzMm8zM2dvZE0/edit?pli=1 

2) le categorie usate per valutare il lavoro di podcasting dei ragazzi: dice l'autore "bisognava valutare una pluralità di abilità/competenze" . proprio quello che dobbiamo fare anche nella nostra scuola italiana./https://docs.google.com/document/d/1hnzI9r6NNwhLDv-LHV0yb72CK5C6d3-xt_k_5zfpuDI/edit?pli=1

Allan Shaw's curator insight, January 23, 2014 4:37 PM

"John Dewey believed that education must be " . . . a process of living and not a preparation for future living." This powerful idea is a helpful reminder of the rich, insightful growth and knowledge that can come from deep, collaborative learning experiences."

Therefore, it could be said true learning is about acting out the theory, of rhetoric and reality remaining close, of adults modelling for young people appropriate learning attitudes and behaviours, as those young people, if forced to choose, will copy what you do rather than do what you say!

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27 Ways to Build a Team

27 Ways to Build a Team | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"There are several benefits in having your students work as a team. Social Learning theory explores these benefits. But, how do you do it? Here are 27 ways to build a team."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 29, 2013 9:20 PM

Learning to work collaboratively is a skill we often talk about, but how do we build teams in our classrooms? If you are asking yourself this question check out this infographic and learn 27 ways to build a team.

Ashleigh Dawley's curator insight, September 30, 2013 4:18 PM

Thought this was a great way to get thinkig about teams and different ways to form them. Uses funn interactive and proactive ways to build a team.

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Back to School with Google Docs: Support Research/Writing/ Collaboration

Back to School with Google Docs: Support Research/Writing/ Collaboration | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 19, 2013 6:24 AM

Are you using Google Docs? This post explores many of the options available to you in Google Docs including:

* Google Docs for Research - Look under Tools to access Research. As well as allowing you to research within Google Docs this tool streamlines " the process of creating hyperlinks and appropriately formatting citations."

* Google Docs for Collaborative Writing - Some of the features of this tool include sharing and commenting, built-in dictionary, smart spell check and grammar check, one click footnotes and citations, Easy Bib connection and revision history.

The Common Core stresses the need for students to collaborate. Google Docs may assist your students in the process. The post also contains quite a few screenshots.

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, August 19, 2013 3:10 PM

Looks like an easy and interesting way to promote good research skills in the classroom!