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High School Librarian, American International School - Chennai
Curated by Jenn Alevy
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Classic Paintings of London On Top of Google Street Views of the City

Classic Paintings of London On Top of Google Street Views of the City | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

If you walk the streets of London often enough, it’s easy to forget the massive amount of history that surrounds you. But, just looking up can send your head spinning into the past again. From the giant dome of St. Paul’s Cathedral, to the towers of Westminster Abby and the quiet banks of the Thames in Greenwich, almost every view of the old city is filled with stories from the past. Redditor shystone recently when on an internet odyssey using classic paintings from the city’s history and matching them up with modern day views from Google Street View.

Each example here is filled with fascinating details and obvious comparisons in life separated by centuries… even if the buildings remain the same.

More images and information at the link.


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Maps of unrealized city plans reveal what might have been

Maps of unrealized city plans reveal what might have been | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

Maps can direct us from here to there, show where one thing is in relation to another, or add layers information to our surroundings. Whatever its form, a map’s main purpose is to make the complex world we live in more comprehensible.

But there are also maps that describe the world as it never came to be.

Those are the maps that interest Andrew Lynch, who runs a Tumblr called Hyperreal Cartography & The Unrealized City that's full of city maps collected from libraries, municipal archives, and dark corners of the internet.

Lynch recently shared a few of his favorite “dream cities” with WIRED’s MapLab...


Via Luca Baptista, Lauren Moss
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Watch Iconic Skylines Emerge Before Your Eyes

Watch Iconic Skylines Emerge Before Your Eyes | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

Corporate real estate data offers unexpectedly riveting views into the past.


Calgary-based real estate company Cube Cities has put together a series of 3-D animations that offer a mesmerizing look at the development of the modern cityscapes of New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Calgary, and Toronto. The videos overlay developer-reported data on construction dates on 3-D mapping technology from Google Earth.

Cube Cities is a new company focused on combining commercial real estate listings with Google Earth visualizations, in an effort to provide customers with a better idea of how prospective office space fits into a city's landscape. After signing up, you can zoom around and get a sense of, say, the views overlooking the Chicago River from the 40th floor of a specific skyscraper.

Developers used the video project to play around with representation models, so each of the videos use slightly different methods to indicate new buildings. In a particularly cool effect, the San Francisco animation begins with clear outlines of the current skyline, and viewers watch as the phantom city turns solid as time moves forward.


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Francois Brosseau's curator insight, August 13, 2014 4:42 PM

Demand for office space by corporate tenants and businesses have fueled the growth of cities and their changing skylines.  We can indeed give credit to visionary developers taking on the development risk, but at the very root of development is demand which arises from the success of corporate and business tenants.

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The Urban Observatory: A New Way To Compare Cities, From The Creator Of TED

The Urban Observatory: A New Way To Compare Cities, From The Creator Of TED | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
This giant installation and a website you can play with at home lets you compare the worlds urban centers side by side.

We live in a world of easily accessible maps; however, our map knowledge is limited by the fact that no two cities collect data the same way. Maps often aren’t drawn to the same scale, and until now, there hasn’t been a way to compare data on things like income, cost of living, water distribution, and power grids.

It’s a problem that has bugged Richard Saul Wurman, the creator of the TED conference (as well as an architect and graphic designer), for decades.

Wurman recently teamed up with Jon Kamen of Radical Media and Esri president Jack Dangermond to create an ambitious solution: the Urban Observatory, an immersive exhibit featuring standardized comparative data on over 16 cities. Zoom in on one city map and other cities will simultaneously zoom in at the same scale, making it possible to compare data on traffic density, vegetation, residential land use, and so on.


Find more details and information at the article link...


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Subway Maps Of Cities Around The World Redesigned In A Circular Format

Subway Maps Of Cities Around The World Redesigned In A Circular Format | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

Mapmaker Max Roberts has created a new way to map out subway lines.  Conventional maps usually emphasize “straight lines, clean angles and geographical accuracy”. Unlike those maps, Roberts’ circular design is a blend of “aesthetics and usability”. 

Roberts discovered this “completely new way of designing maps” when he was designing a map for the London Underground that took into account the circular nature of the Orbital rail link. He realized the potential of the new design in forcing “cities into an unprecedented level of organization” and the coherence achieved. Sacrificing geographical accuracy, his schematic design shows how elements in the map relate to each other logically, while taming the web of criss-crossed lines usually found in subway maps.

View maps of the New York City Subway, the London Underground and the Paris Metro at the article link, or head over to hiswebsite to see more circular maps of other cities. 


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Niki Brown Beck's curator insight, December 5, 2014 9:44 PM

New perspective (transportation)