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High School Librarian, American International School - Chennai
Curated by Jenn Alevy
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Rescooped by Jenn Alevy from Geography Education
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200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized

200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"Where have immigrants to the U.S. come from? Natalia Bronshtein, a professor and consultant who runs the blog Insightful Interaction, created this fascinating visualization of the number of immigrants to the U.S. since 1829 by country of origin.  The graph hints at tragic events in world history. The first influx of Irish occurred during the potato famine in 1845, while the massive influx of Russians in the first decade of the 20th Century was driven by anti-Semitic violence of the Russian pogroms (riots). Meanwhile in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, army conscription and the forced assimilation of minority groups drove people to the U.S. in the early 1900s.  Since WWII, Central and South America and Asia have replaced Europe as the largest source of immigrants to the U.S. Immigration shrunk to almost nothing as restrictions tightened during WWII, and then gradually expanded to reach its largest extent ever in the first decade of the 21st Century."

 

Tags: migration, historical, USA, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
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Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, March 24, 6:52 PM

200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized

Brian Stinson's curator insight, March 25, 1:24 PM

We've talked a lot about natural increase rate and how population fluctuates but we haven't discussed immigration to the U.S. Check out this interesting graph that shows where immigrants have come from for the past 200 years.

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, March 25, 4:20 PM

Quite impressive new graphic approach to cope with immigration flows in the USA

Rescooped by Jenn Alevy from Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path
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Are Freshman Ready for College Research?

Are Freshman Ready for College Research? | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
A recent report from Project Information Literacy identifies the challenges that college freshmen face as they tackle their first major research projects.

 

We identified a disparity between the Google-centric search skills that many first-term freshmen brought with them from high school and the competencies they needed to meet the far higher research expectations in college. Moreover, we found freshmen we studied had gaping holes in their understanding of how libraries--and the vast array of digital resources academic libraries provided--could best meet their needs, especially when it came to sifting out the trusted information they wanted."

That's the conclusion from the most recent report from Project Information Literacy, [ http://projectinfolit.org/pdfs/PIL_2013_FreshmenStudy_FullReport.pdf ] headed by Alison Head of the Berkman Center and the University of Washington.


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Rescooped by Jenn Alevy from Geography Education
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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


Via Seth Dixon
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Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 4:04 PM

Different cultural religions and senses of place in America.