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High School Librarian, American International School - Chennai
Curated by Jenn Alevy
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Mission 3: A Cheyenne Odyssey - Interactive History Game

Mission 3: A Cheyenne Odyssey - Interactive History Game | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"Mission US is a multimedia project that immerses players in U.S. history content through free interactive games.

In Mission 3: “A Cheyenne Odyssey,” players become Little Fox, a Northern Cheyenne boy whose life is changed by the encroachment of white settlers, railroads, and U.S. military expeditions.  As buffalo diminish and the U.S. expands westward, players experience the Cheyenne's persistence through conflict and national transformation."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 3, 2014 9:49 PM

"A Cheyenne Odyssey" is the third mission from Mission U.S. This interactive game will teach students about the Cheyenne's experience. There is a teacher guide available for this game (as well as the first two: Mission 1 - For Crown or Colony? and Mission 2 - Flight to Freedom). Each guide provides an overview, background information, standards alignments, activites, primary sources and there are videos to help provide guidance for teachers.Two additional games are set to be released in 2014 and 2015. The games are geared to students in Grades 5 - 8.

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Why games are good for learning?

Why games are good for learning? | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Francesco G. Lamacchia's curator insight, November 21, 2013 11:48 AM

Giocando....s'impara! 

Julio Cirnes's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:46 PM

Please teacher, more games!

Ryan McDonough's curator insight, July 7, 2014 8:19 AM

Self explanatory visual on the benefits of gaming as a means of learning. Outlined are the rewards, mastery, engagement, intensity, exercise, readiness, and competitiveness. These types of graphics need to be displayed in the classroom. There's always parents who are unsure of how gaming qualifies as teaching. Can't they just sit their kid in front of an iPad all day at home? Well, in the appropriate setting, with the right direction and guidance, games are certainly good for learning. Some people just don't know that from experience yet.

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How To Help Your Students Embrace Failure through Game-based Learning

How To Help Your Students Embrace Failure through Game-based Learning | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"Whether our students fear the dark, monsters, heights, some other imagined horror, or something more real such as family troubles or bullying, everyone is afraid of something. For students in our schools those fears probably include something that is an inherent part of our society and our educational system – failure."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 28, 2013 9:20 PM

What would happen if you used game-based learning in your classroom and took advantage of the of the fact that students do fail when they play games, providing opportunities for them to understand how they may also fail in class and more on. Three strategies are explored in this post.

* Encourage cooperative play

* Implement structures for active engagement

* Embrace failure as a learning opportunity

In addition to providing detailed explanations of these strategies the post also provides a look at 21 smart games for game-based learning and some as well as links to locations where you may find educationally relevant games.

The Rice Process's curator insight, November 29, 2013 8:59 AM

Interesting inights.

MLC Junior School Hub's curator insight, December 2, 2014 3:28 AM

Everyone is afraid of something. However, we need to encourage our students not to fear failure, but embrace it as a natural part of the learning process.

One area where failure is naturally integrated is games-based learning where progress is built on the concept of experimentation - failure and adaptation.

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Submrge | Deeper Thinking about Games and Education

Submrge | Deeper Thinking about Games and Education | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 14, 2013 10:23 PM

Submrge is a website that has the tag line “Deeper Thinking About Games and Education.” It is divided into a number of sections including Games, Activities and Links.

What makes this site unique is the information it provides on each game. “Each game page includes important information for teachers, like benefits of play, educational issues for discussion, easily accessible game information, and activities related to the game on Submrge.” In addition to this information there is also a page for each game that includes “important information on the level and subject, but also the activity’s relationship to Bloom’s Taxonomy, Common Core Standards, 21st Century Skills, and the H.E.A.T. Framework. If you are wondering what HEAT Framework stands for think of Higher Order Thinking, Engaged Learning, Authentic Connections and Technology Use. This page also provides a list of learning styles and the games I checked included an Essential Question,

The Links section has resources in the following areas:

* More on Games as Text

* Advice on Games in the Classroom

* General Games Collections (many content-specific)

If you use games in your classroom, or are considering doing so, this website will provide additional resources that may provide you with new ideas.