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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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Rescooped by Michael Miller from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Map - The 47% of the US where nobody lives

Map - The 47% of the US where nobody lives | HMHS History | Scoop.it

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

 

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading


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27 Magical Photos That Prove Why Getting The Airplane Window Seat Is Absolutely Necessary.

27 Magical Photos That Prove Why Getting The Airplane Window Seat Is Absolutely Necessary. | HMHS History | Scoop.it
I'm NEVER falling asleep on an airplane again!
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History vs. Vladimir Lenin

"View full lesson on TED-ED": 

 

Vladimir Lenin overthrew Russian Czar Nicholas II and founded the Soviet Union, forever changing the course of Russian politics. But was he a hero who toppled an oppressive tyranny or a villain who replaced it with another? Alex Gendler puts this controversial figure on trial, exploring both sides of a nearly century-long debate.


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Armando's curator insight, April 11, 7:31 PM

History vs. Vladimir Lenin

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The Silk Road and Ancient Trade: Crash Course World History #9

The Mongols Shirt is available for pre-order now! http://dft.ba/mongols The Silk Road and Ancient Trade: In which John Green teaches you about the so-called ...
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5 of the World's Most Worrisome Disputed Territories

5 of the World's Most Worrisome Disputed Territories | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Territorial disputes are nothing new, but political analysts warn of a rise in tensions because of Russia's bold move into Crimea.
    
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Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them

Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Wow. I guess it's true when they say not everything is as it appears...

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 21, 11:34 AM

I think it's awesome to see the past mixed with the present, and realizing how our imagination adds to the "mystery" of places.  However, seeing things in context truly changes perception - how could this be brought to your students?  Fascinating.  

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 28, 11:43 AM

LA PERCEPCIÓN A TRAVÉS DE LA DISTANCIA

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 5:33 PM

By looking at these images it is apparent that heir is a clear distincition between how one may view the monument from upclose andd then when you take asep back you can really appreciate it by seeing others appreciate it as well. As an observer you can also identify the different persepectives by looking at it in a different light by either taking a step back or viewing it from a different vanage point. Knowing the history of the monument also helps with a background story in order for better appreciation of the monument and the History that goes along with it.

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Indoor national performance bodes well for Haddonfield girls - Philly.com

Indoor national performance bodes well for Haddonfield girls - Philly.com | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Indoor national performance bodes well for Haddonfield girls
Philly.com
The last event of the winter heralded what could be a remarkable spring for the Haddonfield girls' track team.

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Time Lapse: Exploring the Cosmic Dawn

Time Lapse: Exploring the Cosmic Dawn | HMHS History | Scoop.it
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Shipwrecks Lost to Time That Archaeologists Would Love to Get Their Hands On

Shipwrecks Lost to Time That Archaeologists Would Love to Get Their Hands On | HMHS History | Scoop.it
These wrecks carried everything from Bronze Age explorers to a lost Egyptian sarcophagus.
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Angels Landing

"Since 2004, six people have died falling from the cliffs on this route." is what the sign says. Only one step from a 1400 foot fall.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 24, 9:10 AM

Angel's Landing in Utah's Zion National Park (map) is one of my favorite hikes with an amazing view.The geomorphology of 'red rock' country is stunning and it's sheer cliffs are bound to captivate the imagination.  If you want something like this but with a more European flavor, watch National Geographic's Andrew Evans climb Preikestolen in Norway.   


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.

Utah Geographical Alliance's curator insight, March 25, 7:22 PM

Thank you @APHumanGeog beautiful video of #Utah to remind us it is spring! Get your students outside and enjoy our beautiful home, teaching students outside can be very rewarding in teaching them about the world we live in.  

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Watch as 1000 years of European borders change

Watch as 1000 years of European borders change | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Michael Miller's insight:

Really neat idea but is a bit inaccurate in spots....still shows the complex geographical, cultural and territorial changes that are a fact of life in Europe...

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World War II: Crash Course World History #38 - YouTube

Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! Visit http://dft.ba/-CCWHDVD to buy a set for your home or classroom. You can directly support Crash Cour...
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Facts for Features: Irish-American Heritage Month (March) and St. Patrick's Day

Facts for Features: Irish-American Heritage Month (March) and St. Patrick's Day | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Originally a religious holiday to honor St. Patrick, who introduced Christianity to Ireland in the fifth century, St. Patrick's Day has evolved into a celebration for all things Irish. The world's first St. Patrick's Day parade occurred on March 17, 1762, in New York City, featuring Irish soldiers serving in the English military. This parade became an annual event, with President Truman attending in 1948. Congress proclaimed March as Irish-American Heritage Month in 1995, and the President issues a proclamation commemorating the occasion each year."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 17, 10:30 AM

We celebrate St Patrick's Day to commemorate him for driving out the snakes from Ireland in the 5th century (or to just have an excuse to party, kiss and pinch people).  What does the biogeography of Ireland have to tell us about this legend?  Some believe that the non-believers (figurative 'snakes') were what he drove out of the Emerald Isle, a land with a rich culture.     

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The Presidents History Channel) 1825 1849 John Q Adams to Polk - YouTube

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A Brief History of U.S. Diplomacy

A Brief History of U.S. Diplomacy | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The pages that follow trace the history of U.S. diplomacy from the first defensive steps of a fledgling nation to the global reach of a superpower. Benjamin Franklin is regarded as America’s first diplomat, and the four men pictured above were its first 'ministers of foreign affairs.'"


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Tsunami alert after 8.2 Chile quake

Tsunami alert after 8.2 Chile quake | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Waves of up to 2.1m (6ft) have hit some areas in Chile, and there have been power cuts, fires and landslides. Tens of thousands of people were evacuated in affected areas, where a state of emergency has been declared. Chilean TV broadcast pictures of traffic jams as people tried to leave. Officials said the dead included people who were crushed by collapsing walls or died of heart attacks. Iquique Governor Gonzalo Prieto told local media that in addition to those killed, several people had been seriously injured. While the government said it had no reports of significant damage to coastal areas, a number of adobe homes were reported destroyed in Arica.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 9:34 AM

See some of footage of the when the quake actually hit here.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 10, 1:32 PM

What happens in one place can affect another. The earthquake in this location could have sent a tsunami rippling towards another country in another part of the world. Not only are there environmental concerns but the results of ineffective infrastructure can be seen in traffic jams, adobe homes crumbling, or in walls collapsing on people.  As the article points out, there were also landslides which if they were in an area that was heavily logged, may have been avoided with more trees. With people leaving the center of the affected area - surrounding cities and towns may get overwhelmed by refugees, which will put strain on their resources.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 17, 2:14 PM

Another example of how the most beautiful places to live can also be some of the most dangerous. Fortunately this happens often enough here that there is a warning system already established which saves lives.

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Communists, Nationalists, and China's Revolutions: Crash Course World History #37

Don't forget! Crash Course posters and t-shirts at http://www.dftba.com/crashcourse In which John Green teaches you about China's Revolutions. While the rest...
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Overview of Chinese History from 1911 - 1949 - YouTube

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Tony Hall's curator insight, March 6, 6:38 AM

Wow. This is amazing. The cynical side of me wonders what the costs have been for the people of the area. Not to mention the environmental costs.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

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Video: Changing Earth

Video: Changing Earth | HMHS History | Scoop.it
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300 Years of Embattled Crimea History in 6 Maps

300 Years of Embattled Crimea History in 6 Maps | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Crimea has been invaded many times before, as these historical maps show.
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We Are Happy From...

We Are Happy From... | HMHS History | Scoop.it
As a token of gratitude to Pharrell Williams , Clément Durou & Pierre Dupaquier for their worldwide contagious happiness...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 9:22 PM

Be happy...and spread the joy.

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The Best Map Ever Made of America's Racial Segregation

The Best Map Ever Made of America's Racial Segregation | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all.

 

White: blue dots; African American: green dots; Asian: red; Latino: orange; all others: brown

Last year, a pair of researchers from Duke University published a report with a bold title: “The End of the Segregated Century.” U.S. cities, the authors concluded, were less segregated in 2012 than they had been at any point since 1910. But less segregated does not necessarily mean integrated–something this incredible map makes clear in vivd color.

The map, created by Dustin Cable at University of Virginia’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, is stunningly comprehensive. Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, it shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That’s 308,745,538 dots in all–around 7 GB of visual data. It isn’t the first map to show the country’s ethnic distribution, nor is it the first to show every single citizen, but it is the first to do both, making it the most comprehensive map of race in America ever created.


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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:41 PM

We can use maps to think spatially,make connections, and find patterns. Maps can also be used as a way to compare change over time, as in this particular case where maps from the present were compared with maps from over fifty years ago when racial segregation was plainly obvious. Now, however, when we compare past maps with those of the present, the change over time factor becomes clearly evident, revealing why maps are so useful in determining continuities or changes.

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USA vs USSR Fight! The Cold War: Crash Course World History #39 - YouTube

Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! Visit http://dft.ba/-CCWHDVD to buy a set for your home or classroom. You can directly support Crash Cour...
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Capitalism and Socialism: Crash Course World History #33 - YouTube

Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! Visit http://dft.ba/-CCWHDVD to buy a set for your home or classroom. You can directly support Crash Cour...
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