HMHS History
Follow
Find
5.1K views | +1 today
HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.

 

Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Gaëlle Solal's curator insight, April 1, 12:58 PM

ça vous en bouche un coin?!

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, April 14, 6:00 PM

This shows the costums that several other Countries use in north America we cross our legs but in Countries Like Asia disrespectful. In America we view blowing or Noise is normal in Japan that Considered rude

Roman M's curator insight, April 16, 12:17 PM

This article shows the different customs on gestures or body language in the world. What we might do is disrespectful in another country. For example, even some as simple as crossing your legs while sitting is common in North America and some European countries. However, it is viewed disrespectful in Asia and the Middle East.

RM

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized

200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Where have immigrants to the U.S. come from? Natalia Bronshtein, a professor and consultant who runs the blog Insightful Interaction, created this fascinating visualization of the number of immigrants to the U.S. since 1829 by country of origin.  The graph hints at tragic events in world history. The first influx of Irish occurred during the potato famine in 1845, while the massive influx of Russians in the first decade of the 20th Century was driven by anti-Semitic violence of the Russian pogroms (riots). Meanwhile in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, army conscription and the forced assimilation of minority groups drove people to the U.S. in the early 1900s.  Since WWII, Central and South America and Asia have replaced Europe as the largest source of immigrants to the U.S. Immigration shrunk to almost nothing as restrictions tightened during WWII, and then gradually expanded to reach its largest extent ever in the first decade of the 21st Century."

 

Tags: migration, historical, USA, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 22, 6:37 PM

Current theme! 200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized | @scoopit via @ProfessorDixon http://sco.lt/...

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 26, 6:43 PM

This map showed me the immigration patterns and helped me understand how it has changes over time. This ties in with this unit well because it explains what it is and immigration in the US.

 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 8:51 AM

"The first influx of Irish occurred during the potato famine in 1845, while the massive influx of Russians in the first decade of the 20th Century was driven by anti-Semitic violence of the Russian pogroms (riots). Meanwhile in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, army conscription and the forced assimilation of minority groups drove people to the U.S. in the early 1900s." America is the land of opportunities and throughout history people have come to it to work because of opportunity or because they are refugees.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The surprising math of cities and corporations

"Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities — that wealth, crime rate, walking speed and many other aspects of a city can be deduced from a single number: the city's population. In this mind-bending talk from TEDGlobal he shows how it works and how similar laws hold for organisms and corporations."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2014 2:44 PM

While corporations rise and fall, it is quite rare for a city to entirely fail as an economic system.  Huge cities have some negative consequences, but the networks that operate in the city function more efficiently on economies of scale in a way that offsets the negatives.  Increasing a city's population will continue to improve the economies of scale (larger cities have higher wages per capita, more creative employment per capita, etc.).  However, this growth requires major technological innovations to sustain long-term growth.  

 

Tagsurban, planningmegacities, industry, economic, scaleTED, video.

Built 4 Betterness Ed van den Berg's curator insight, December 14, 2014 3:17 PM

Not surprisingly the DNA of cities is a follow-up of human DNA and understanding this will explain and predict how the body of a city will develop!

SRA's curator insight, April 16, 2:10 AM

The idea that cities are just organisms that are satisfying the laws of biology is interesting. Especially because Physicist Geoffrey West brings the idea of Scalability which by definition is, the ability of a system, network, or process to handle a growing amount of work in a capable manner or its ability to be enlarged to accommodate that growth. What’s mind blowing to me is that the system that is referred to here is human interaction.  We create these cities through our interaction and experience. With a growth rate of 1,000,000 people every year the math adds up to an agreeable 15% rise in income levels, patents, and super creative people every year which is undoubted a win for civilization and society. But with that we must keep in mind also this means a 15% increase in things like deadly disease, crime, poverty, and ecological issues leading to further degradation of our planet. This unbounded growth means the system is destined to collapse. The math behind cities doesn't lie if we don’t prepare cities have a fate to die like every other organism in Biology. So it is up to us to create and innovate to sustain this growth and avoid the collapse. But we must do so at a forever increasing pace. Which subsequently is also part of another system predetermined to collapse. What I mean is what happens when we cannot innovate fast enough to sustain this growth?


- Caleb Beckett

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

United States of Craigslist

United States of Craigslist | HMHS History | Scoop.it

When you login to craigslist, it will funnel you to the closest local group.  What would that a map of that process look like?  I'm not a huge fan of the Central Place Theory (but it is in the curriculum), but maybe this map could help explain some of the ideas of the theory. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

22 International Borders

22 International Borders | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Brazil (top) and Bolivia (bottom)."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:52 PM

The concept of a political boundary has been developed over many many years into an unbreakable line between two different sets of people with different ideologies, religions, and government styles. The boundary extends into the ground, into the air, and includes any resources within the boundary. These pictures show the different shapes and various lines between countries, and displays the intricacies of boundaries in the world.  

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 2014 10:21 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of land use patterns. As certain countries practice deforestation, slash-and-burn and other land use types, bordering countries may take a completely indifferent approach to the land and thus create a contrast.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:11 AM

Photographs show how different countries can be even by just the border. Number 3 really stuck out to me that Haiti doesnt have as many regulation reguarding deforestation as the Dominican Republic and its very noticable.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How future urban sprawl maps out

How future urban sprawl maps out | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Projections of urban growth indicate areas where biodiversity is at high risk.

 

The AAG Smart Brief is a fantastic source of geographic news.  This is what they said about this article:  "Areas such as tropical Africa and eastern China are expected to be hot spots of urbanization during the next several years, according to researchers, who used satellite imagery and other data to project future urban expansion through 2030. 'We're not forecasting population, we're forecasting the expansion of urban space,' said Yale University geographer Karen Seto. Their efforts could be used to assist conservation initiatives, Seto noted."

 

Tags: AAG, urban, sprawl, land use, urban ecology, biogeography, unit 7 cities, environment.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Fiedler's comment, July 24, 2013 7:56 AM
This article is about urban growth and decline, Africa and Asia are predicted to be hot spots of urban growth in the next few years. Geographer Karen Seto of Yale University in New Haven has creted a graph that finally accounts for variations in how individual cities occupy their land and the impact they have on local ecosystems.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why cities should dismantle highways

Why cities should dismantle highways | HMHS History | Scoop.it
At TEDxPhilly, Next American City editor at large Diana Lind explains why cities should rethink their highway infrastructure.

 

For generations, the prominent model of urbanism accepted in the U.S. has placed the automobile as the top priority for public places, placing massive highways right in the middle of key downtown areas.  Some cities (including Denver, DC, NYC, Providence and Dallas) are rethinking the relationship between urban spaces and the transportation networks.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Megacities Interactives

Megacities Interactives | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, will be home to 29 megacities. We explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of these 'cities on steroids', and take a look at the challenges and opportunities megacities present for the tens of millions living in Lagos, Mexico City and Dhaka."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 27, 2014 8:53 AM

Through this BBC interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents.   Also, this Smithsonian Magazine interactive (also on the rise of Megacities), argues that dealing with megacities is one of the traits of the Anthropocene. 


Download the BBC data as a CSV file to be able to import this into a customizable ArcGIS online map.  This will help you to create an analytical storymap (but I still enjoy a good narrative storymap).  


Tags: urban, megacitiesESRI, anthropocene, CSV.

Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's curator insight, October 27, 2014 3:40 PM

and wuhan inside

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 11:48 AM

This article asks and answered the question of how and when we will reach a time and place where we live will be limited (as we weigh down the world)? -UNIT 1

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Water and Development

Water and Development | HMHS History | Scoop.it

When access to clean drinking water is an issue, it creates a web of developmental problems for a community.  For a video with more information about water/development statistics, but the organization http://charitywater.org see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCHhwxvQqxg&feature=player_embedded


Via Seth Dixon
more...
David 's comment, May 21, 2012 11:58 PM
thank you for your awesome information
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What Will Be Left Then?

What Will Be Left Then? | HMHS History | Scoop.it

A fun thought exercise touching on the themes of energy, resources, consumption and sustainability.  We all know that we are consuming resources quickly; if we (globally) continue at the same rate of consumption, how long with certain resources last?  If a is child born now, what resources would be gone when s/he is a middle aged?  A senior citizen? See the animated version here: http://www.amanda-warner.com/samples/whatleft/  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | HMHS History | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Fresh Water Resources

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/where-we-get-our-fresh-water-christiana-z-peppard Fresh water accounts for only 2.5% of Earth's...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 12, 2013 2:45 PM

How much of the Earth's water is fresh water?  How much of that is used for industrial, agricultural or domestic uses?  Why is groundwater becoming increasingly utilized?  Enjoy this TED-ED video for the answers. 


Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend.

Agron S. Dida's comment, December 17, 2013 5:33 AM
Ben, there is a good link about the lack of water: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131216154330.htm#.UrAC_n3F2FA.twitter
Rescooped by Michael Miller from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Scoop.it!

How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
more...
Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 8:47 PM

Unit 4

This video explains what goes on at United Nations meetings. 193 people gather in New York to discuss matters of peace and security. Established in 1945 made up of 50 countries and made to prevent another World War. The UN deals with matters of economics social policy, human rights, and culture. And the most important parts is the security council (made up of France, Britain, the United States, China, and Russia) and the general assembly. 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 6:01 PM

Just a nice brief summary or how the United nations worked for political geography 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 8:47 AM

The UN is one of the most impact organizations we have today. The UN is a powerful peacekeeping supranational organization organized to help all nations and countries

Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

Five College Basketball Shooters to Keep Your Eye On During March Madness

Five College Basketball Shooters to Keep Your Eye On During March Madness | HMHS History | Scoop.it
NBA players still take more midrange shots than 3s; college guys exhibit the opposite pattern.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The United Countries of Baseball Map

The United Countries of Baseball Map | HMHS History | Scoop.it

This is the new and improved version of the familiar map can teach regions (formal, functional, vernacular) as well as the importance on TV markets as a diffusion mechanism for culture.  As mentioned by Andy Baker, "This map is also useful for showcasing 'threshold' and 'range' from 'Central Place Theory.' For instance, I ask my students, 'Why are the Mid-Atlantic & California coasts boundaries (range) so small compared to Great Plains teams?'"  Great idea Andy!


Via Seth Dixon
more...
ASeagrave's comment, January 30, 2012 2:14 PM
It's crazy how obsessed the eastern side of the country is with baseball, but how oblivious and uninterested the western side is.
LMullen's comment, February 2, 2012 5:17 PM
I'd like to see a sales map with this because even thoug the Yankees and Redsox regions are much smaller than the Atlanta Braves or Texas Rangers, they pobably sell MUCH more.
Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, March 24, 7:57 PM

Although short, I had to dive into the set of webpages that the article presented. it did not give a whole lot of information about the map, but the previous scooper of this article gave a very interesting hindsight on the map. This Baseball map shows the importance of TV markets as a diffusion mechanism for culture. Each of the regions of this map have been classified according to the national Baseball team people from the regions support.

Reflection- not only geographers define regions, but also popular trends and statistics. As well as the last scooper said, it is interesting to note that the Mid-Atlantic and California coasts boundaries between each region is very small compared to Great Plains regions. It is also interesting the fact that the regions include, sometimes, more than just one state, and in other cases, two or more teams exist within one state, such as Texas.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World

Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Adapted from the book by Professor Susan Hanson...

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 29, 2013 9:40 AM

This is an excellent review/summary of an edited volume that shows the value of geographic thought and its importance in the modern world.  This review conveniently gives a one paragraph synopsis of each chapter.  It does not need to be read chronologically, so you can pick and choose what you find relevant to your course.  The top 10 are (in order of inclusion in the book): the Idea of the Map, the Weather Map, GIS, Human Adjustment, Water Budget Climatology, Human Transformation of the Earth, Spatial Organization and Interdependence, Central Place Theory, Megalopolis and Sense of Place.

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 5:24 PM

Summary: This article demonstrated how geographic concepts have been able to change daily life for humans everywhere. It talked about the log term effect of many life changing geographic concepts, such as how maps have influenced weather forecasts which have become an important part of daily life.

 

Insight:  This article showed me how important geographic processes can be on daily life.  It also demonstrates that nearly everyone in a developed country today relies on their ability to read geographic information even in something as simple as a weather map.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Exclusive timelapse: See climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfold as Earth evolves over 30 years.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
oyndrila's curator insight, May 17, 2013 1:24 PM

Exciting!!

Ishola Adebayo's comment, July 31, 2013 9:07 AM
good day Sir, pls need help on fixing scan line errors on lansat7 ETM images from 2003 using for example ArcMap9.3 or ENVI4.5 or.........thank you so much
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 10:55 AM

summer work KQ2 key concepts: remote sensing, deforestation, desertification, land use, geospatial

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Transportation Networks Impacting Urban Patterns

Transportation Networks Impacting Urban Patterns | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 11, 2013 1:00 PM

Essay #3 for the AP Human Geography 2013 exam focused on how railroads and highways impacted the size and form of U.S. cities.  Andy Baker, one of the great readers on that question has put together an interactive map filled with tangible examples of how Indianapolis' land use history has been heavily influenced by the railroads and highways.  This would be a great resource to prepare students to answer that FRQ. 


Tags: transportationurban, models, APHG.

Ally Greer's comment, June 11, 2013 1:58 PM
This brings back memories from when I took this in high school!
Andy Baker's comment, June 17, 2013 4:03 PM
Thanks for "scooping" this. When I click the link, it takes me to the Google home page. Here's the link: https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid=215141888958669508744.0004bb9c881395bd56662&msa=0&ll=39.772659,-85.940552&spn=1.06603,2.364807
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Central Place Theory

Central Places:Theory and Applications produced by Ken Keller (kellek@danbury.k12.ct.us) adapted from Don Ziegler.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 20, 2014 11:09 PM

Good Review HUGGERS

 

Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 9:53 PM

This was a nice powerpoint that gave a concise and to the point depiction of the central place theory. It had some good examples and pictures that allowed me to really visualize and go over the theory without confusion.

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 5:04 PM

Central Place Theory - This PowerPoint is the best representation of Christaller's Central Place Theory that I've seen! It does a great job at showing its hexagonal layout, along with describing urban hierarchy and sizes, and range that a person will go to buy certain goods.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Augmented Reality Sandbox

"Realtime topographic contour line generation."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, March 8, 10:08 AM

Well, that is just incredible. Now THAT'S a sandbox! Augmented Reality is going to be a major gamechanger.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 5, 9:20 PM

Every Geography classroom needs one of these to explain topography

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 12:24 PM

This thing is sick! I would love to make one of these i would play with this thing for hours and I'm an adult. And they say video games are useless, the kinect can be used for things other than dance offs and such. 

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere

If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere | HMHS History | Scoop.it
If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere, from the USGS Water Science School...

 

"This picture shows the size of a sphere that would contain all of Earth's water in comparison to the size of the Earth. The blue sphere sitting on the United States, reaching from about Salt Lake City, Utah to Topeka, Kansas, has a diameter of about 860 miles (about 1,385 kilometers) , with a volume of about 332,500,000 cubic miles (1,386,000,000 cubic kilometers). The sphere includes all the water in the oceans, seas, ice caps, lakes and rivers as well as groundwater, atmospheric water, and even the water in you, your dog, and your tomato plant."

 

The sphere does not include the potential water that some scientists believe may be trapped in the mantle (and thus not accessible on the surface).  For more about water that is not on or near the surface, see: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/03/0307_0307_waterworld.html


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Gary Robertson's comment, May 7, 2012 9:36 PM
Water is also tied up in hydrated minerals in the rocks of the earth's crust. While not "free" it is still significant and is occasionally freed through subduction and volcanic activity. Furthermore, the earth's mantle may contain even more water than the rest combined! So, maybe the Single Sphere should be larger by more than the cube root of 2, or about 1,083 miles in diameter. See mantle water data at http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/03/0307_0307_waterworld.html
Seth Dixon's comment, May 7, 2012 11:08 PM
Thanks Green Uncle Mary! I mean Mean Uncle Gary!
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Economics of Sustainability

http://www.ted.com Have we used up all our resources? Have we filled up all the livable space on Earth? Paul Gilding suggests we have, and the possibility of...

 

This provocatively title TED talk would be an excellent resource for discussing sustainable development.  What are the economic, environmental, political and cultural ramifications of suggested policies that seek to lead towards sustainable development?  What are the ramifications of not changing policies towards sustainable development?  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:02 AM

 I found this video very interesting because it spoke about how there is so little space and more and more people are having kids. But there is no space because everyone likes having a lot of room to expand that is why because everyone in the world could fit in the state of California. So there is space it is just not spread out good enough that everyone could fit comfortably. 

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Energy Conservation

Energy Conservation | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Energy conservation starts at home....

 

This interesting National Geographic article emphasizes how consumption patterns in the home are connected to some of the serious global issues that we currently face.  This article becomes an exploration into how to go about creating a more environmentally sustainable home. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Teresa Gallego Navarro's curator insight, December 18, 2012 9:50 PM

The best energy is the one we don´t consumpt!!