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"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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Columbus, de Gama, and Zheng He! 15th Century Mariners. Crash Course: World History #21

In which John Green teaches you about the beginning of the so-called Age of Discovery. You've probably heard of Christopher Columbus, who "discovered" Americ...
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When is Thanksgiving? Colonizing America: Crash Course US History #2

In which John Green teaches you about the (English) colonies in what is now the United States. He covers the first permanent English colony at Jamestown, Vir...
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The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island

The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’, just off the coast of the island nation of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean."


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, September 26, 2013 11:19 AM

this look pretty nice i would like to go see it in person

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:36 PM

By looking at this picture you automatically think its a waterfall within the water. This image is actually just showing the mix of sand and silt deposits mixing together. The light to dark colors is what makes it look like a waterfall. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:24 PM

Another spectacular sight. Of course, you will need a plane or helicopter to venture above it to see it, but this illusion is pretty nifty.

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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | HMHS History | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


Via Seth Dixon
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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 9, 2015 2:15 PM

Fantastic collection!

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, January 6, 5:02 PM

Entre art et géographie...

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Pages From an Underground Railroad Conductor's Diary Preserve Fugitive Slaves' Stories

Pages From an Underground Railroad Conductor's Diary Preserve Fugitive Slaves' Stories | HMHS History | Scoop.it
William Still, Philadelphian and son of a formerly enslaved woman who had escaped to freedom before his birth, was a prominent conductor on the Underground Railroad.
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A stunning turn that could silence Syria war drums

A stunning turn that could silence Syria war drums | HMHS History | Scoop.it
While light on details, a Russian proposal for Syria to turn over chemical weapons shifts the war debate.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:36 AM

The world is waiting to see how the drama in the Middle East unfolds. 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:56 AM

I understand the need to do something and I also understand why Americans do not want to do this.  However I believe something should be done as it seems we all are forgetting our history.  Does anyone remember 9/30/1938.  A speech given by then British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain promised "...peace of our time."  He was talking about the Munich Agreement where Hitler promised that Czechoslovakia would be his last territorial grab.  Well we all know what that led to.  We cannot appease or let people get away with actions like this.  If he is allowed to use the gas on his own people whats to stop him from using it on Turkey, Israel or even in the US as part of a terrorist attack.  Just something else to think about .. an old quote which is a paraphrase, those who do not learn history will be doomed to repeat it.

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51 Great Burger Joints by USA Today :: Burger Beast

51 Great Burger Joints by USA Today :: Burger Beast | HMHS History | Scoop.it
USA TODAY asked some “local experts” in each state plus 1 in the District of Columbia to name one great Burger Joint. The list is below but are these really the Best 51 Burgers in the U.S.?
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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | HMHS History | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

via gduboz

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 2014 12:16 PM

unit 2

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:16 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article features an interactive map that displays the numbers of IDPs (internally displaced persons) made by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. You are able to look through the years and see the varying amounts of IDPs, as well as the countries that produced the most of them and which continue to.

 

This goes along with the human geography theme of refugees and IDPs, and this is a very helpful article in providing a simple way to see an overview of where and to what extent this most occurs. 

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Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball

Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Football’s analytics are evolving quickly. Thanks to new forms of data and emerging kinds of analyses, teams, media, and fans are gaining new insights into on-field performances."


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:42 PM
This article explains how people come up with the statistics that they can for each player. Using spatial thinking anaylsts can figure out where a player is best on the field. Where players "sweet spots" are on the field or where a player is most effective when playing. It is crazy how people even thought of this.
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Geronimo surrenders — History.com This Day in History — 9/4/1886

Geronimo surrenders — History.com This Day in History — 9/4/1886 | HMHS History | Scoop.it
On this day in 1886, Apache chief Geronimo surrenders to U.S. government troops. For 30 years, the mighty Native American warrior had battled to protect his tribe's homeland; however, by 1886 the Apaches were exhausted and hopelessly outnumbered.

Via Mr. David Burton
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1/5 of Humanity

1/5 of Humanity | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The world divided into 5 regions, each with the population of China."


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 11, 2013 3:10 PM

Your thoughts...?

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:42 AM

This map is mind blowning to try to grasp. To think that India has an equvilant population to every country in the Americans has me dumbfounded. Then comparin the economic instability of India to all the economic juggernauts that fit into the light blue regions really shows how poor the distrubution of wealth and population is throught the world.

Trish Pearson's curator insight, April 9, 2014 3:33 PM

A little perspective on population

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Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable.

Via Seth Dixon
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harish magan's comment, September 10, 2013 7:09 AM
It is very interesting to explore new cities and their sky views
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:41 PM

After taking this quiz I realized I could not really identify most of these cities. I could tell some of them were European from the look of the buildings. I also thought a few more were cities in the United States but there was only Dallas. In my opinion these cities are even more spectacular than some of our major cities. 

Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 8:36 PM

is this ularu ?

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


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Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 2015 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:16 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and perspectives

Although the article relating to this diagram is in Russian, the diagram is not, and I found it to be a very interesting visual to not only show world religions developing on a time scale, but also because it does a very good job of showing just how many little divisions of each religion they are, and how they are all intertwined. Zooming in on the diagram, you are able to see each divide, each new branch, and each date for hundreds of sets of information.

 

This illustrates the theme of identification of major world religions because it simply shows the mass amounts of tiny divisions that occur in the major world religions in a simple format. This is very helpful because this would be pages of writing if you tried to write it all out. 

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The 13 Colonies

The 13 Colonies | HMHS History | Scoop.it
In 1776, the Declaration of Independence announced that the English colonies in North America were a sovereign nation: the United States of America.
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Revolutionary War Infographic

Revolutionary War Infographic | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Via Kristen McDaniel, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, September 19, 2013 12:26 PM

Thought infographics were a recent invention? Think again!  This chronological table of the Revolutionary War shows how and when different states were involved.  Great primary source!

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Anne Hutchinson arrives in the New World — History.com This Day in History — 9/18/1634

Anne Hutchinson arrives in the New World — History.com This Day in History — 9/18/1634 | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Anne Hutchinson, an Englishwoman who would become an outspoken religious thinker in the American colonies, arrives at the Massachusetts Bay Colony with her family.

Via Mr. David Burton
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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | HMHS History | Scoop.it
This map, made by the U.S. Coast Survey in 1861 using census data from 1860, shows the relative prevalence of slavery in Southern counties that year.
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Above Australia's Northern Territory

Above Australia's Northern Territory | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Over half of Australia lies above the Tropic of Capricorn, but it is home to only five percent of the population. It is a frontier land with little infrastructure, populated by cattle barons, crocodile hunters and aboriginal tribes.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 17, 2013 9:36 PM

Remoteness and liveability

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:19 PM

This is a huge chunks of Australia but only a little amount of people live there.

Nick and Hayden's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:21 PM

New territory in Australia!❤️❤️ 

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Oral History and September 11th

Oral History and September 11th | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 10, 2013 8:04 PM

This lesson plan from the Choices Program will:

  • Explore the human dimension of the September 11 attacks by conducting an interview.
  • Consider the benefits and limitations of using oral history to learn about the past.
  • Assess their own views on September 11th.
Harper Wharton's curator insight, September 10, 2013 11:01 PM

Tomorrow is 9/11, a day that America will never forget. At my old school, we learned a lot about 9/11, and when it was the day of the Twin Towers we would watch videos on the incident and read books on it. Learning about the Twin Towers is an intersting topic to me because I love to find out why the people would do this to America and how America retaliated. I would love to find out more about the Twin Towers this year. 

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Israel dubious of Russia's Syria chemical weapons proposal, but Iran and China back 11th-hour diplomatic push

Israel dubious of Russia's Syria chemical weapons proposal, but Iran and China back 11th-hour diplomatic push | HMHS History | Scoop.it
As Assad's allies back Moscow's proposal to avert U.S. strikes, Israeli leaders suggest it's just an effort to "buy time"
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United States nicknamed Uncle Sam — History.com This Day in History — 9/7/1813

United States nicknamed Uncle Sam — History.com This Day in History — 9/7/1813 | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Discover what happened today in history. Read about major past events that happened today including special entries on crime, entertainment, and more.

Via Mr. David Burton
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National Geographic Found

National Geographic Found | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.  We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location."


Via Seth Dixon
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elianna sosa paulino's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:27 AM

I think that is a manigficient photo i can't believe that these phoos nev been published and also missing their original location.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:31 AM

These pictures are awesome. It would be nice to know the locations of some of the pictures to compare them to images now.

 

Jonathan Lemay's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:05 PM

this is amazing!

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Revisiting Martin Luther King's 1963 Dream speech

Revisiting Martin Luther King's 1963 Dream speech | HMHS History | Scoop.it
As people gather today to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech, we look at images from that event in 1963 and from tumultuous times during the civil rights movement.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 4, 2013 8:57 AM

This is a nice compilation of classic images from Martin Luther Kings speech but also for the entire civil rights movement.  These would serve as great teaching images to have the students analyze them as they would a piece of text to uncover the historical and sociological context.  

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High School Students Interviewed

Jay Leno interviews high school students knowledge of global issues and geographic understanding...as I'm sure you can guess, it isn't pretty. 


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Patti Griffiths Bryant's curator insight, August 27, 2013 12:17 PM

It's our virtual reality folks, kids' worlds are still only a big as their arms' length. #LetsGet4D #GlobalLearning for our #GlobalCommunity

 

Joe Blauw's comment, August 28, 2013 1:08 PM
I think it's sad that people aren't educated enough to know where main superpower countries are such as Great Britain or some of the terrorist countries that have been all over the news for several years I was surprised and disappointed
Norma Ellis's curator insight, September 2, 2013 7:28 AM

Worth sharing

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Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Dr Sarah Parcak uses satellite technology to unearth Egypt's ancient settlements, pyramids and palaces lost in the sands of time.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 4, 2014 12:10 AM

It is interesting to find out that in this specific article there is controversy over the looting of tombs over 5,000 years ago as soon as the deceased were buried there were many more looting acts taken place. The Arab spring is an important landmark to think of when relating this to the reading.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:51 AM

This describes human characteristics that defined this region because it shows how ancient artifacts are being unearthed through new-age technology.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:49 AM

Space archaeology only makes sense.  If we have the capability for satellites to take pictures of earth from above why shouldn't it be used for archaeological analysis?  I am sure that this is only the tip of the iceberg as far as what we will see in the future from this specific field. This article/video just lends more credibility to the fact that Archaeology should function as an interdisciplinary field.