HMHS History
7.1K views | +0 today
Follow
HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

The Golden Gate Bridge Didn't Collapse!! Good Stuff Happens Every Day!

In which Hank talks about why we think the world is super screwed up and getting worse every day when, in fact, the world is pretty OK and getting better eve...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Fantastic Maps
Scoop.it!

What happens when people draw a map of the world from memory

What happens when people draw a map of the world from memory | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Can you draw a map of the world just from memory? And if you did, how accurate do you think your map would be? Probably not very.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 3, 2014 1:34 PM

Honestly, I don't think I could do much better (although I could nit-pick this to death).

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Global Affairs & Human Geography Digital Knowledge Source
Scoop.it!

Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


Via Seth Dixon, Allison Anthony
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2014 10:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 2014 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:53 PM

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates. 

Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

GOOD NEWS: 14 Reasons 2014 May Be the Best Year Ever - YouTube

In which John Green shares some encouraging trends and statistics about the current state of humans in the world. Poverty and infant mortality are decreasing...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

A New Map Reveals the Geography of American TV News

A New Map Reveals the Geography of American TV News | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The visualization shows a world unevenly aglow with television attention.

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
Sarah Ziolkowski's curator insight, January 14, 2014 2:57 PM

This article applies to the concepts of culture unit, and more specifically, globalization. It talks about how most Americans receive news, which, not surprisingly, is the television. This produces confusion and miscommunication for viewers, and controls our news intake. The article shows a map how often a place is mentioned on a news broadcast, and its overwhelmingly uneven. Is this answered with population or something else? Whatever it is, this shows how our news is controlled, which controls our political views-your political views. Short term solution, get your news from different sources.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

How Many Earth-like planets are out there?

How Many Earth-like planets are out there? | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Astronomers using NASA data have calculated for the first time that in our galaxy alone, there are at least 8.8 billion stars with Earth-size planets in the habitable temperature zone.  For perspective, that's more Earth-like planets than there are people on Earth."


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
Greg Russak's curator insight, December 20, 2013 9:20 AM

I love this kind of news. I just wish it was more scientific and less hyperbolic.

Here's my only gripe with this article. I can't believe someone like a UC Berkley planet hunter named Geoff Marcy would actually talk about the radio silence issue without somehow further qualifying it. It makes me wonder if Seth Borenstein of the AP and/or his editors may have left out some of the more important elements of that topic.

Personally, I find this anthropomorphic attitude about radio silence to be both ridiculous and insulting to the intellect.  

Just because we haven't picked up any electromagnetic signals doesn't mean there isn't life - or even intelligent life - in our galaxy or in the universe. How incredibly egotistical (and incredibly unscientific) it is to assume that life elsewhere will have evolved into beings like us. How silly it is to then assume that that intelligence would invent, just like our species did, technologies like radio, TV, satellite communications, and the like. Even more absurd and overlooked in this so-called question of silence is that that technology would have had to have been invented and put into use at precisely the point in THEIR evolution such that THEIR signals would be reaching us NOW so that we could detect them, assuming that we had the right technology to do so.

Let's put the "radio silence" question into the time and distance perspective of our own species. KDKA broadcast the first commercial radio signals from Pittsburgh in 1920. That's 93 years ago. That means those extremely weak signals would only be detectable as of now to a distance of 93 light years from us.

The Milky Way Galaxy is 120,000 light years across. Those signals have made it 0.075% of the way across our galaxy.

I don't doubt for one second that there's life in our galaxy and elsewhere in the universe, but can we please stop wondering why the Vulcans or Klingons or Romulans haven't shared reruns of their version of I Love Lucy?

Treathyl Fox's comment, December 20, 2013 9:57 AM
The NBC News SCIENCE article uses the word "habitable" but makes no mention of trees. I have a problem with that. :) Seriously!
Nicolle Kuna's curator insight, December 20, 2013 6:09 PM

That's more than enough planets for each one of us.  No doubt humanity will in time find a way to mine and devour these ones too. 

 

Nicolle, Converse Conserve.Com

Home of Eco-Creativity and Sustainability Education

Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

A Long Goodbye for Mandela - New York Times

A Long Goodbye for Mandela - New York Times | HMHS History | Scoop.it
New York Times A Long Goodbye for Mandela New York Times PRETORIA, South Africa — From across South Africa and around the world, tens of thousands of people waited under a blazing summer sun on Thursday for a chance to bid farewell to Nelson...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Fantastic Maps
Scoop.it!

Autocomplete Map

Autocomplete Map | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Zoomable autocomplete map of the world. Yahoo autocomplete results for countries and US states (screenshot of US states shown here)." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 13, 2013 10:32 AM

This is very interesting, showing what a search engine will automatically suggest.  While this is telling on what opinions about places exist, you can't read too much into this because this reflects the numerous place-based stereotypes that are out there. 

Siri Anderson's curator insight, January 22, 2014 8:27 AM

Helpful!

 

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Most Americans live in Purple America, not Red or Blue America

Most Americans live in Purple America, not Red or Blue America | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"We're far less politically divided by geography than it may seem....Of course, it’s true that Americans aren’t of one mind on many political issues.  But it is important that we not look at these maps and infer that we are so politically polarized by geography.  In fact, most Americans live in places that are at least somewhat politically and ideologically diverse — even if that’s not reflected in how congressional district boundaries are drawn.   In terms of the most important driver of political choices — partisanship — most of us live in a purple America, not a red or blue America."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Chamath Gunawardena's curator insight, December 15, 2013 5:06 PM

I like this article because it shows that the preference of a political party doesn't divide america completely so that that some states are completely republican or completely democratic. Showing that america isn't as politically divided in certain areas means we can view other's views in those areas as a unique view.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 2:01 PM

Americans are entitled to their own beliefs. If they want to be a democrat thats fine. If they want to be a republican thats fine too. Back in the day, this map may have looked different and more on the red and blue sides than purple, but in todays world people have changed. They are not entitled to be a democrat just because they live in a democratic society. People live in areas of purple (more so than just red or just blue), not red or blue and the purple color gives Americans a chance to think for themselves.

Gabby Watkins's curator insight, May 13, 2014 7:50 PM

Unit 5

Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

What dialect do you speak? A map of American English

What dialect do you speak? A map of American English | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Do you pahk the cah? Do you eat olycooks? The words you use can identify where you came from.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

Nelson Mandela - Barack Obama pays tribute to South Africa's Madiba

Click for more Nelson Mandela memories: http://bit.ly/1aFcRts US President Barack Obama has paid tribute to Nelson Mandela, describing him as influential, co...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Fantastic Maps
Scoop.it!

Mapping How Emotions Manifest in the Body

Mapping How Emotions Manifest in the Body | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Across cultures, people feel increased activity in different parts of the body as their mental state changes.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 31, 2013 11:38 AM

Mapping the mind/body/soul connections is beyond my expertise, but it is something everyone should seriously consider. 

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, December 31, 2013 12:21 PM

Emotional cultural divide? What are the factors...

 

Jacqueline Taylor-Adams's curator insight, December 31, 2013 12:38 PM

Emotions drive so much of our activities. Understanding how emotions manifest and impact our bodies are great lessons for us to learn on our journey to wellness.


Walk with Me, #ImWalkingInWellness

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Fantastic Maps
Scoop.it!

This Interactive Map Shows How Far You Could Travel In 24 Hours

This Interactive Map Shows How Far You Could Travel In 24 Hours | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Think your holiday flights were long? Think again.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:16 AM

This series of maps is one of my favorite way to visualize the Time Space Compression.  Advancements in transportation and communication are the two technological keys to advancing globalization, essentially making the world a smaller place. 

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 7, 2014 5:28 PM

Great resource. Good for thinking..problem solving

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:46 AM

unit 2 time space compression!

Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8 - YouTube

In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country oper...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Fantastic Maps
Scoop.it!

A map of 19th Century shipping routes and nothing else

A map of 19th Century shipping routes and nothing else | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Nautical trade routes stretch like so many lengths of string in this arresting visualization of intercontinental commerce in the 1800s.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Spend Your Weekend Gawking at Nearly 700 Old Maps of the U.S.

Spend Your Weekend Gawking at Nearly 700 Old Maps of the U.S. | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Okay, history buffs. We've got a challenge for you: Learn as much as you possibly can from the 700 odd maps just uploaded to the University of Richmond's Digital Scholarship Lab. Your brain will thank you later.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 3, 2014 11:07 AM

I just love old maps.  :)

Rescooped by Michael Miller from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

The South Is America's High-School Dropout Factory

The South Is America's High-School Dropout Factory | HMHS History | Scoop.it
America's educational attainment, mapped. 

Via Nancy Watson, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Fantastic Maps
Scoop.it!

The World's Newest Island, Niijima

The World's Newest Island, Niijima | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Where there once was no land, now there is.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 18, 2013 1:36 PM

Mapping layers are NEVER fully completed since the world that we live in is constantly changing. 

Rescooped by Michael Miller from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Medical History

Medical History | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 13, 2013 11:31 AM

I found this on social media (unfortunately I don't have an original source to link to fo documentation) and was greatly impressed by the information here, but also the historical implications of this information.  Could/would this happen today?  How would the world be different is this was the 'new normal?'  How would the world be different if this never did happen?

Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, December 16, 2013 7:02 AM

but nowadays, researchers spend much time to get money to work.... and to learn and on the other hand, biotherapies market is skyrocketting!

Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

Defense rises to occasion as Haddonfield wins

Defense rises to occasion as Haddonfield wins | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Sitting back in coverage, Ted Stavetski followed the quarterback's eyes.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Coffee: The Greatest Addiction Ever

Help support videos like this: http://www.cgpgrey.com/subbable **CGPGrey T-Shirts for sale!**: http://goo.gl/1Wlnd Grey's blog: http://www.cgpgrey.com/blog/ ...

Via Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Michael Miller's insight:

Uhh, maybe you guys are right and I should start drinking coffee...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

Nelson Mandela: His impact on American activism, politics and pop culture

Nelson Mandela: His impact on American activism, politics and pop culture | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Nelson Mandela: A look at his impact on American activism, politics and pop culture
more...
No comment yet.