HMHS History
Follow
Find
5.0K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
onto HMHS History
Scoop.it!

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | HMHS History | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, June 19, 2014 9:44 AM

El bien más preciado.  El recurso agotable más subvalorado del planeta. 

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2014 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

From around the web

HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

Story Map Tour - Place Based Geography Videos

Story Map Tour - Place Based Geography Videos | HMHS History | Scoop.it
This story map was created with the Esri Map Tour application in ArcGIS Online.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

Interactive Game of Thrones Map with Spoilers Control

Interactive Game of Thrones Map with Spoilers Control | HMHS History | Scoop.it
A map of Westeros and the rest of the known world in Game of Thrones and the Song of Ice & Fire novels. Mark how much of the TV show or novels you've seen to prevent seeing any spoilers. See the path of major characters over time.
Michael Miller's insight:

can you say obsessed?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Road from Europe to U.S.? Russia proposes superhighway

Road from Europe to U.S.? Russia proposes superhighway | HMHS History | Scoop.it
London to New York City by car? It could happen if the head of Russian Railways has his way.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 29, 8:04 AM

Really? A twelve thousand mile roadway built through some of the roughest terrain known to man, through some of the least populated areas in the world, linking areas that have no development or tourist attractions? What a great idea....

The cost of this road would be in the trillions and who is going to fund this? What economic benefits will be derived from this undertaking? I don't know about you, but my dream trip would be to drive through Alaska for about 12 hours so I could see snowbanks, and then, wait for it, drive about nine thousand miles through more snowbanks, to reach Moscow, a viable attraction. Sounds legit to me! I have an incredibly original idea on how to accomplish this differently; fly there!

Think about what the average person would have to do to embark on this trip; passport, visas, an incredible amount of money to pay for the gas, an incredible amount of time to do this. A 12k trip @ 60 mph is on the order of 200 hours of driving, without stopping. Eight hours a day of driving gets you just this side of a month's worth of time.

Use your airline points, fly to Moscow, drink some Absolut, have a bowl of Borscht soup and spend some rubles on tourist attractions. Leave the driving to the Formula One organization.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 1, 10:28 AM

I cannot see a superhighway, as proposed here, ever coming to fruition.  There are too many countries involved, first off.  Secondly, this would take massive amounts of coordination and planning and Russia, western Europe, and the U.S. cannot agree about a little strip of land in Ukraine, never mind agreeing on specifics for a 13,000 mile long highway.  It is interesting to look at and dream of but I cannot see it happening.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 6, 11:05 PM

This is an interesting idea.  But it seems like one would be in the car for three weeks to get to London.  I wonder what kind of towns would pop up after Fairbanks.  If it's going to cost trillions, where would the return come from?  Who would get the return on the investment?  If Russia is willing to fund this then why don't they fix the areas of Russia that need help.  

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Viva Gentrification!

Viva Gentrification! | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"In Highland Park, as in other Latino barrios of Los Angeles, gentrification has produced an undeniable but little appreciated side effect: the end of decades of de facto racial segregation. It's possible to imagine a future in which 'the hood' passes into memory.  Racial integration is on the upswing.  For all the fortitude and pride you'll find in Latino barrios, no one wants to live in a racially segregated community or attend a racially segregated school."  

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, California, Los Angeles.

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 12:33 PM

APHG- HW Option 5

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Daily Show–Spot the Africa

Between rampant racial inequality and Ebola outbreaks, South African comedian Trevor Noah admits he hesitated to visit a country as underdeveloped as America.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 10:03 AM

Since social media is buzzing with the news that Trevor Noah is replacing Jon Stewart as the host of the Daily Show, I wanted to show a geographically themed clip from one of Trevor's previous correspondence pieces on the show.  This clip was filmed during the height of the Ebola hysteria and Ferguson protests; the main topic is misconceptions in the United States about Africa.  His life itself is a portal into mixed South African geographies.


Tags: Ebola, Africa, regions, perspective.

Mrs. B's curator insight, March 30, 8:40 PM

SO GLAD He is going to be the new host of the Daily Show when Jon retires. Such a bright young man.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Public Spaces Worth Caring About...

http://www.ted.com In James Howard Kunstler's view, public spaces should be inspired centers of civic life and the physical manifestation of the common good....

 

Kunstler impassionedly argues that American architecture and urban planning are not creating public places that encourage interaction and communal engagement.  We should create more distinct places that foster a sense of place that is 'worth fighting for,' as opposed to suburbia which he sees as emblematic of these problems.  How should we design cities to create a strong sense of place?  What elements are necessary?  Warning: He uses some strong language.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mary Burke's comment, April 15, 2013 12:24 PM
I appreciate what this guy is saying. I wish we could build places worth caring about. We need more people like Mr Kunstler. But I don't things are as bleak as he depicts. He picked some of the ugliest places there are. We do need a sense of place. Right now we get that in our homes. I think what Mr Kunstler is talking about is a community based sense of place that could be created just with the kind of buildings we make in the space. Maybe we could create a friendly atmosphere with well designed buildings. We need to start somewhere to make people not so afraid of each other.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:44 AM

Everyone in the world should care about places if it is small or not known but a place has it own character that some people enjoy while other do not want to know about. Every place has it significance that many people have not noticed because they are blinded to it. People should really have an open mind when it comes down to experiencing new places and learn about its history or anything that you did not know about it.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Kids Who Get Driven Everywhere Don't Know Where They're Going

Kids Who Get Driven Everywhere Don't Know Where They're Going | HMHS History | Scoop.it
A new study suggests vehicular travel affects children's ability to navigate their neighborhood and connect to their community.

 

We learn about the places around us by exploring.  Literally our mental map is formed by making choices (in part through trial and error) and that process strengthens our spatial perception of the neighborhood.  Research is showing that kids with a 'windshield perspective' from being driven everywhere are not able to draw as accurate maps as children for who walk and bike their neighborhood.  The built environment and the transportation infrastructure in place play a role in developing spatial thinking skills for young minds. 

 

This is a compelling article with some important implications.  What are the ramifications for geographers?  City planners? Educators?  Families moving to a new neighborhood?   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:52 AM

We may not realize it but when we take our kids out on drives to run errands or if we move to a different area we are ruining their understanding of the area they live in. Children often have a hard time of figuring out where they are if they constantly in a car looking at new places. This can cause them to lack a sense of direction and maybe have trouble remembering streets or landmarks near their homes. 

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl]

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl] | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The need for speed devours huge chunks of American cities and leaves the edges of the expressways worthless. Busy streets, for almost all of human history, created the greatest real estate value because they delivered customers and clients to the businesses operating there. This in turn cultivated the highest tax revenues in town, both from higher property taxes and from elevated sales taxes. But you can't set up shop on the side of an expressway. How can cities afford to spend so much to create thoroughfares with no adjoining property value?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alex Lewis's curator insight, March 10, 10:23 AM

This article shows the difference between extremely urbanized areas and relatively urbanized areas. Florence and Atlanta are compared. Florence has narrow streets with sharp intersections, which causes cars to drive slowly. This is safer for pedestrians. In Atlanta, the roads are wider and curves are less sharp. The most this will do is help people in Atlanta get tp their jobs slightly faster. Miami and a seaside town are also compared. The interstate in Miami takes up most of the room and there is few real estate options. In the seaside town, options are not limited, around 80% available for use. The less urbanized places are more efficient. 

 

-A.L.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 10:48 AM

This blog really made me realize what an impact humans are to the environment. They compare different cities and talk about the impacts and it really showed me how humans have built up cities.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 21, 6:12 PM

A side by side comparison at first blush is striking but the devil is in the details. Florence, Italy is a city of only 368,000 while the Atlanta metro area is about 4.5 million. Agree that sprawl is ineffective real estate and efficiency wise, but fuel prices may be having a counter effect on the reduction of sprawl. It is much less expensive to commute given the price of oil at its current levels and the millennials will have a say in this urban sprawl contracting or expanding. Many do not own cars, relying on commuter systems within the city to get around. This in theory should drive down demand for fossil fuels, culminating in reduced prices for gasoline. If the infrastructure is already built, was is the cost to maintain it, given the static population of the large metro areas? Interesting to see how this plays out.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How architectural innovations migrate across borders

"As the world's cities undergo explosive growth, inequality is intensifying. Wealthy neighborhoods and impoverished slums grow side by side, the gap between them widening. In this eye-opening talk, architect Teddy Cruz asks us to rethink urban development from the bottom up. Sharing lessons from the slums of Tijuana, Cruz explores the creative intelligence of the city's residents and offers a fresh perspective on what we can learn from places of scarcity."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 2014 7:41 AM

As a geographer native to the San Diego region with family on both sides of the border, I found this TED talk very compelling personally, but also rich in geographic themes (city planning, diffusion, governance of space, socioeconomic differences in land use patterns, etc.).  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  San Diego and Tijuana have more to offer each other than economic markets--the ideas born out of distinct socioeconomic and political contexts can be just what is needed on the other side of the border.


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, sprawlneighborhood, borders. planning, urban ecology, densityplanning, TED

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 11:47 AM

(Mexico topic 2)
I think that elaborating upon border tensions from an artistic viewpoint (or any outside viewpoint for that matter) was an excellent idea. This allows a wider scope of inter-related issues to be examined, which might otherwise not be if left to a purely 'internal' perspective.
I approve of Cruz's way of referring to the Mexican-American border issues as more of a humanitarian issue and less of a physical-border problem. Similarly, I was impressed by his view of immigration as being not just of people, but also of knowledge and culture.
Lastly, I agree with Cruz's belief that there is a lot San Diego can learn from Tijuana in terms of sustainabililty and waste mitigation. My favorite example was that of the used tires as retaining walls: a simple yet environmentally-friendly solution to bettering land use. Ideas such as this have the potential to reduce the rate of urban sprawl (and amounts of waste in the process). Many other examples from his lecture, including the stacking of houses and businesses, reinforce this point as well. In this way, immigration earns a more positive connotation and shows how "twin cities", despite their political differences, can still benefit each other.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:22 PM

A bottom up urbanization is a very descriptive phrase (top down bottom up). Citizens taking control of their environment.

As a person that is from southern California and a native of San Diego this TED talk was very informative. I often have never thought of many of the products that southern Californian's have used being sent over the boarder when they are through. I believe we are a country of consumers and the rate at which we discard "things" is alarming. All too many times people use the mentality of throwing away instead of repairing. In our society it is acceptable to be wasteful. I believe this is something that needs to end. Until the day comes that we do not go to Walmart to purchase something and throw it away a couple months later , it is good to know someone is at least getting some use from it .Taking charge of their environment ,bettering their situation.

Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

The Ecomonics of Westeros

The Ecomonics of Westeros | HMHS History | Scoop.it
A video created by Business Insider takes a deep dive look into the economic situation in Westeros in time for Season 5
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

‎2,000 Years of Chinese History! The Mandate of Heaven and Confucius: World History #7 - YouTube

John Green teaches you the history of the world in 42 episodes!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population Growth in Metropolitan America Since 1980

Population Growth in Metropolitan America Since 1980 | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The twists and turns of metropolitan population growth are reviewed in William Frey’s examination of recently released Census Bureau data separating the bubble and bust years of the past decade.

 

Key urban demographic changes from 1980-2010:

--Metropolitan growth in both the Sun Belt and Snow Belt tapered in the 2000s, after accelerating in the 1990s.

--Growth slowed considerably during the latter part of the 2000s, especially in “bubble economy” metropolitan areas.

--Suburbs continued to grow more rapidly than cities in the 2000s, but growth rates for both types of places declined from their 1990s levels.

--Exurban and outer suburban counties experienced a population boom and bust in the 2000s.

--Hispanic dispersion to “new destination” metropolitan areas and suburbs dropped sharply in the late 2000s.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rayden Duncan's curator insight, October 2, 2013 11:38 AM

This relates to my topic in that it shows how the united states populaction moved into urban settings.  It show cities are generally showing an increases in population. poeple would move to cities to find jobs or shorter commute.

Aleasha Reed's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:16 PM

This is a map that shows the rate of change in the U.S., population wise. The most growth occured on the western and eastern coast's. There were a few places with a decreasing population.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Vintage Video of NYC

"Oldest and most incredible footage of New York City ever, including where the WTC would be built. With added maps carefully researched to show where the camera was. 28 shots of classic footage circa 1905." http://tinyurl.com/ohsuobg


Tags: urban, historical, architecture, landscape, NYC.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 21, 2:26 PM

"Material de archivo más antiguo y más increíble de la ciudad de Nueva York , incluyendo donde se construiría el World Trade Center. Con mapas añadidos investigado cuidadosamente para mostrar dónde estaba la cámara. 

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 24, 4:04 PM

ajouter votre aperçu ...

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 25, 1:23 PM
Surviving Film
Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

1989 Raw Video: Man vs. Chinese tank Tiananmen square - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 11:23 AM

Multiple names on the map can hint at bigger cultural and political fault lines.  Is it Londonderry or just Derry?  The Sea of Japan or the East Sea?  This article I wrote for the National Geographic Education Blog is on the always simmering tensions in the China's westernmost province.  


TagsCentral Asia, toponyms, culture, political, conflictgovernance, China, East Asia, religionIslam, landscape.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 1:09 PM

This is definitely not the first time a dynamic like this happens and it will not be the last.  Whenever a country tries to incorporate a territory inhabited by a people with a different culture than their own into their sphere friction occurs.  Just like in Africa after the Berlin Conference, the Europeans experienced most resistance due to splitting up ethnic groups or making them live within the same realm as an enemy or outside group.  The indigenous people of Xinjiang, China are not Han Chinese.  They speak and identify more with a Turkish identity.  It is not hard to see that there is a big conflict of interest in the Northwestern corridor of China.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 2:06 PM

This blog is interesting as it shows that China is not afraid of suppressing ethnic minorities to advance its goals.  As a social studies education major, with a focus in history, this reminds me of the USSR of old in a way.  Both countries contain ethnic minorities that are marginalized and discriminated against.  China's treatment of the people in Xinjiang or Eastern Turkistan as the natives call it is horrible.  The Communist Government is creating a culture that will push back, increasingly aggressively to the it.  If China doesn't handle this situation wisely, a Chechnya type situation could arise in the region.  China should do its best to prevent this, as this could be detrimental as the country would have to fight insurgents in its borders and it could become a target of the world wide Jihad of radicals in the Middle East.  As interesting as this article is, I actually never heard of this region, unlike Tibet which I learned about in High School.  However, as I said before this region has the possibility to influence the globe and China's reaction also plays into this situation.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

iScore5 APHG


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 9:00 AM

iScore5, the app for AP Human Geography is now available in the Apple Store for $4.99. With five levels of questions at increasing difficulty, bonus and double bonus rounds and a study mode with extensive vocabulary, APHG students and teachers alike will find this a great test prep resource and a fun and engaging way to help students earn that 5 (open disclosure--I was a part of the team that developed content for the app, but am NOT receiving any money for promoting it.  I'm sharing it because I'm excited about this new resource).  


Tags: APHG, teacher training, edtech.

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, March 27, 9:59 AM

just an option

Dustin Fowler's curator insight, March 27, 10:16 AM

For 5 bucks?  Might be worth looking into.  Especially if you have a class set of iPads. 

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Unkind Architecture: Designing Against the Homeless

Unkind Architecture: Designing Against the Homeless | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Defensive architecture is revealing on a number of levels, because it is not the product of accident or thoughtlessness, but a thought process. It is a sort of unkindness that is considered, designed, approved, funded and made real with the explicit motive to exclude and harass. It reveals how corporate hygiene has overridden human considerations…"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicolas Bernier's curator insight, April 1, 5:07 PM

Very bad taste indeed / de très mauvais goût !

Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, April 3, 9:41 AM

añada su visión ...

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 5, 7:58 PM

The government should try to develop better methods to keep homeless out of the street. Planning and designating a place to the homeless group by offering better conditions, will change the problem.  As the architects have new ideas to resolve a problem with the homeless, they should also be formulating ideas to prevent homelessness such as providing feasible shelter on the street. Part of the problem is that shelters should be marketed in the communities. Local businesses, policies and general communities could be more active in helping these minority groups to get aid and better their life. Cities should provide more programs and aid for the homeless group. 

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time

Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time | HMHS History | Scoop.it
A groundbreaking Mapbox project ushers in a new era for online cartography.

 

On Google Earth, the seasons rarely change. Most anywhere a digital traveler goes, the sky is cloudless and the grass is green. No snow on the ground in Iowa. No fire in Valparaiso. It's a big gap between the world as it is and as it's mapped.

Launched Thursday,a landmark project from Mapbox has changed the summertime paradigm for online cartography. Landsat-live reveals the planet's surface in real time and in stunning resolution, fed by a constant stream of public-domain imagery from NASA’s Landsat 8 satellite.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
YEC Geo's curator insight, March 23, 11:59 AM

This sounds really cool.

 

UPDATE:  I've had a chance to look at this. 

 

Cool things:  great images.

 

Not so cool:  It's not a substitute for Google Earth.   You can only pan out or in to a limited degree, so to go from Texas to Timbuctoo, for example, would take a lot of clicking and dragging.  Best way to get to a place is to type it in the search box.  No 3-D view also. And if there are a lot of clouds when the image was taken, they'll obscure the landscape.

 

That being said, if you want to see large-scale, recent images of a particular place, it's a good site. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 4:34 PM

Summary: This interesting article talks a lot about modern technologies effect on the popularity of geography. This article talks about how programs like Google Earth have caused a general interest to arise about physical geography.

 

Insight: This article is significant to unit 1 because it shows how GIS can be so influential to not only geographers but to the rest of society.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 12:16 PM

unit 1

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 4:43 PM

  Glad to see that these countries could come to an agreement on a very large issue.  The Nile is the lifeline for this part of the world and nobody takes its importance lightly or for granted.  This is the type of thing that could put countries at war with one another, so its refreshing to see countries in this part of the world working together to try to improve their livliehoods rather than kill each other over resources.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 12:45 PM

This was an interesting read because I was not too familiar with this dispute. Three leaders have officially signed a deal to end a long dispute over sharing the Nile waters and beginning to build Africa's largest hydroelectric dam in Ethiopia. The three leaders are from Sudan, Ethiopia, and Egypt and signed the agreement in Sudan's capital city. Many feared that previous Dam's would worsen the water supply but this new Dam will give a more fairer share for everyone. These leaders assured that this new Dam will not cause any harm to the downstream countries but this project is still a ooncern for Egypt. The nile is the only source of water for some. Ethiopia has stated the the river will be diverted a little but will still follow it's natural course. Ethiopia is being backed up by many other countries as well.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 10, 3:29 PM

The key of this article is that there has been an initial treaty signed. This agreement overturns a colonial era treaty which stated any countries upstream (south of Egypt) essentially had no right to touch the Nile in any way that would effect Egypt. They had veto power over everything. 

The reason behind this is that Ethiopia had overthrown there colonial power-Italy, in the 1890's-and was henceforth its own country. Another attempt to seize Ethiopia took place in the 1930's under Benito Mussolini's rule. Him being a fascist and wanting to be like Hitler and take everything certainly contributed to Mussolini wanting to take Ethiopia. Another contributing factor is the fact that Italy tried and failed in claiming/colonizing Ethiopia. They had lost in the battle field. Mussolini wanted to improve and prove Eastern Italian Africa's dominance. Ethiopia would be freed of Italy's rule during WWII and become its own country once again. In any case the article states the treaty designed by the British was set forth in 1929. Ethiopia was not part of British Africa, or a protectorate (in regards to what Egypt would become in relation to the UK), so Britain would not care about the Nile in Ethiopia, rather the Nile in Sudan and especially in Egypt. Any country upstream is to not obstruct or deter the natural flow of the Nile-a pivotal source for Egyptian civilization. 90 percent of Egyptians live within 20km of the Nile while a little over 50 percent live within 1km. It is clear Egypt needs the Nile in order to function.

Ethiopia is able to create jobs through the building of the dam and will also be able to employ people through dam maintenance, inspections, etc... for years to come (if the dam is built). The dam will also provide an immense amount of power/energy, truly benefiting the country. The article states Ethiopia just wants to take a more fair share of the Nile. Everybody feels entitled to the Nile. This concept I understand. With that being said I also understand the concept of Egypt being concerned. There country functions though the Nile and its existing. 

I would like to see more of Ethiopia's plans and the statistics they've gathered throughout the duration of this project. I'm sure they have comprised some projected statistics, not just focusing on the positive aspects (for them) but also the negative aspects for Sudan and Egypt. The article states Sudan is on board but Egypt-although taking part in the new agreement thus putting aside the colonial era treaty- is very hesitant when discussing the existence of the dam. Obviously there are fair reasons for the concern...but then again exactly what are the reasons? How would the Nile be affected by the dam and also how would countries downstream (Egypt, Sudan) be affected? 

Its a concern amongst African countries but is it also a concern amongst the world? Will professionals from other countries "put their two cents in?" 

With all this being said, I suppose it does not matter...to Ethiopia. They have already begun the process of building and are about 30% completed. As stated in this bbc article: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-26679225 Another interesting factor is how other sub Saharan countries are in favor of the dam. Why? Being in favor means they probably benefit from the dam as well, however this is something that may come to my light at the dam progresses. Until the dams construction is arrested, the dam is certainly being built. Ethiopia is making ground, excuse me energy, to better its country as a whole.  

Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

America's romance with sprawl may be over

America's romance with sprawl may be over | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Three years after the recession officially ended, Census county population estimates show Americans are staying put or moving to cities.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Schools used to be the heart of a neighborhood or community. Children and not a few teachers could walk to class, or to the playground or ball field on the weekend. This was relatively easy to do, because the schools were placed within, not separated from, their neighborhoods. They were human-scaled and their architecture was not just utilitarian, but signaled their importance in the community. Now it has become hard to tell one from a Walmart or Target."

 

What better way to demonstrate the concepts of urban sprawl, automobile-dependent city planning and economies of scale than by analyzing the very geographic context of our schools themselves?  This is a very nicely arranged photo essay that most could spark conversation and would foster some discussion on how best to plan neighborhoods and spatially arrange the city.   

 

Tags: transportation, planning, sprawl, education, scale. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from HMHS History
Scoop.it!

The Silk Road and Ancient Trade: Crash Course World History #9

The Mongols Shirt is available for pre-order now! http://dft.ba/mongols The Silk Road and Ancient Trade: In which John Green teaches you about the so-called ...

Via Michael Miller
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

Wait For It...The Mongols!: Crash Course World History #17 - YouTube

John Green teaches you the history of the world in 42 episodes!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Urban issues: Transportation and Density

Urban issues: Transportation and Density | HMHS History | Scoop.it
A map that has been making the rounds on the internet demonstrates how you can fit 7 major U.S. cities plus New York's most famous borough within Los Angeles city limits.

 

So Los Angeles is big, but, LA's spatial extent is in part due to it's history with transportation (ripped out the streetcars to let the automobile and freeway take over).  How do density and transportation affect cities? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

America's suburban future

America's suburban future | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"If you think American cities are sprawling now, just wait until 2025. In that time, the U.S. population will grow by 18 percent but the amount of developed land will increase 57 percent. Up to 9.2 percent of the lower 48 could be urbanized by then. And while that number includes cities and the infrastructure to support them—roads, rail, power lines, and so on—that number does not include land impacted by farming, logging, mining, or mineral extraction."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
mderder's comment, February 19, 2012 5:16 PM
The US has already fallen behind most other first world nations in public transportation. The reliance on the automobile, which enabled the growth of our suburbs, needs to be slowly phased out, and major rail lines need to be laid to serve as the backbone for our future urban/suburban transportation network. Rail is FAR cheaper than cars. Cars, in a sensible future, will be thought of as transport for short trips. Hopefully we will be mainly electric with those 50 years from now as well. It is good for the environment and good for our pocketbook. Classic win/win.