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Reconstruction and 1876: Crash Course US History #22 - YouTube

John Green teaches you the history of the United States of America in 46 episodes!
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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
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Using 'Geography Education'

Using 'Geography Education' | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"This story map was created with ArcGIS Online to guide users on how to get the most out of the Geography Education websites on Wordpress and Scoop.it."


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Bridgitte's curator insight, March 2, 9:24 AM

This story map will introduce you to ways to get the most out of my Geography Education websites.  Updates are available on social media via Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, and Pinterest. 


I’ve organized some of more ‘evergreen’ posts by the AP Human Geography curriculum unit headings as well as ‘shortlist’ for each unit.       

Geography: It’s Nature and Perspectives (shortlist)Population and Migration (shortlist)Cultural Patterns and Processes (shortlist)The Political Organization of Space (shortlist)Agriculture, Food Production and Rural Land Use (shortlist)Industrialization and Economic Development (shortlist)Cities and Urban Land Use (shortlist)


Digitalent's curator insight, March 16, 3:29 AM

This story map will introduce you to ways to get the most out of my Geography Education websites.  Updates are available on social media via Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, and Pinterest. 


I’ve organized some of more ‘evergreen’ posts by the AP Human Geography curriculum unit headings as well as ‘shortlist’ for each unit.       

Geography: It’s Nature and Perspectives (shortlist)Population and Migration (shortlist)Cultural Patterns and Processes (shortlist)The Political Organization of Space (shortlist)Agriculture, Food Production and Rural Land Use (shortlist)Industrialization and Economic Development (shortlist)Cities and Urban Land Use (shortlist)


Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 11, 1:34 AM
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Anyone who wants to be president needs to understand these 5 maps

Anyone who wants to be president needs to understand these 5 maps | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Parag Khanna argues that these five maps are critical to understand the world we live in.

 

Maps shape how we see the world.  But most of the maps hanging on our walls are dangerously incomplete because they emphasize political borders rather than functional connections.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 22, 12:11 AM

These 5 maps in this article are a sneak peek preview from the new book Connectography by Parag Khanna.  These maps all highlight interactions across political borders which is Khanna's big thesis.  For example, the map above emphasizes political, economic, and environmental linkages of NAFTA and minimizes the national divisions.    

 

Tags: regionsNorth Americamap, map archive.

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Where Are The World’s Worst Slums?

The Evolution Of South Africa's Skyscraper Slum http://testu.be/1LDJ60n Subscribe! http://bitly.com/1iLOHml According to the UN, almost a billion peopl
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The Geography of Hunger and Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk...

 

Excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues.   This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.  


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 5, 2011 1:02 AM
This is a incredible clip that does challenge students to synthesize information and make the connections between topics, but it can also help students to realize making a difference at a early age is important. I learned an abundance of facts just from watching, it was informative and intriguing. As I was watching the video I was thinking of ways it can be incorporated into the classroom. This video could get students to learn about the world's number one health risk. Incorporating it into the classroom by holding a food drive, or having a school wide fundraiser to donate to the British Red Cross is also another way to help. Getting our future minds informed and helping the community will make an impact in the future.
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Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:21 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 6, 2015 4:20 AM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sue Byrnes's curator insight, August 6, 2015 6:06 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Global Peace Index

"The 2015 Global Peace Index reveals a divided world, with the most peaceful countries enjoying increasing levels of peace and prosperity, while the least peaceful countries spiral into violence and conflict. Explore the state of world peace on the interactive Global Peace Index map. www.visionofhumanity.org "



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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 8:53 AM

The Middle East and North Africa is now the world’s least peaceful region for the first time since the Index began, due to an increase in civil unrest and terrorist activity while Europe, the world’s most peaceful region, has reached historically high levels of peace.  This might not seem shocking, but there is a great richness to this dataset that can provide detailed regional information as well as answer some big questions about global security.  Explore the data on your own with this interactive map of Global Peace or also of the states within the United States

 

Tags: political, terrorism, conflict, development, statistics, visualization, mapping, governance.

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Czech Republic poised to change name to 'Czechia'

Czech Republic poised to change name to 'Czechia' | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The Czech Republic is expected to change its name to "Czechia" to make it easier for companies and sports teams to use it on products and clothing.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 9:12 AM

That sound you hear is cartographers and database managers gasping at the joy and shock of need to updata all their data and maps.  Old maps still show Czechoslovakia, maybe on date in the future someone will be excited to find "The Czech Republic" on the map as much as I was fascinated to discover Hindustan on a 19th century globe. I also enjoyed this quote from the Czech foreign minister: “It is not good if a country does not have clearly defined symbols or if it even does not clearly say what its name is."  

 

Tag: Czechia, languagetoponyms, culture.

Laura Brown's curator insight, April 15, 11:22 AM

Marketing and media are the new gods. Can't imagine the power they have in order to cause a country to change it's name. Not so long ago battles and wars were fought over cultural identity, now it's for sale. 

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Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | HMHS History | Scoop.it

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steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 2014 4:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2014 5:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

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This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats

This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats | HMHS History | Scoop.it
We know how to harvest potatoes and apples. There are other fruits and vegetables, however, which have natural habitats we can barely imagine. We see these items in the grocery store every day, but often we have no idea how they got there.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 1:17 PM

This set of teaching images hammers home how natural items become commodities that are removed from their original context.  The fact that these foods are somewhat difficult to recognize shows just how most consumers have been removed from the full geographies of their food.  

 

Tagsfood production, images, agriculture, foodeconomic.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, April 24, 4:39 AM
Food - naturally.
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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

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How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger | HMHS History | Scoop.it
About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste, often because of its looks. That’s enough to feed two billion people.

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Katerina Stojanovski's curator insight, March 10, 6:10 AM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

NADINE BURCHI SCORP's curator insight, March 10, 1:24 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 9:29 PM
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Half of the US population lives in the 244 super-dense counties

Half of the US population lives in the 244 super-dense counties | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Population density in the US varies wildly from place to place.
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Republicans have a massive electoral map problem that has nothing to do with Donald Trump

Republicans have a massive electoral map problem that has nothing to do with Donald Trump | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"If Clinton wins the 19 states (and D.C.) that every Democratic nominee has won from 1992 to 2012, she has 242 electoral votes. Add Florida's 29 and you get 271. Game over.

The Republican map [is more difficult] — There are 13 states that have gone for the GOP presidential nominee in each of the last six elections. But they only total 102 electorate votes.That means the eventual nominee has to find, at least, 168 more electoral votes to get to 270. 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 5, 12:18 PM

This isn't just the about the presidential election of 2016, but the demographic configuration of the United States and potential voter base of parties in the future.  As American demographics have shifted, the appeal of particular parties as well as their platforms will eventually shift in response.  Future party realignments will center on maps and demographics as much as they do policies and platforms.

 

Tags: electoral, political, mapping.

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Closing the gap between men and women in agriculture

http://www.fao.org/sofa/gender "The world cannot eliminate hunger without closing the gap between men and women in agriculture. With equal access to productive resources and services, such as land, water and credit, women farmers can produce 20 to 30 percent more food, enough to lift 150 million people out of hunger."


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Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 11, 1:35 AM
A great resource to show geography students! 
Linda White's curator insight, May 13, 10:40 PM
A reason why we need to review all the women that are incarcerated in our society.  The society is loosing so much.
Pascal Corbé's curator insight, May 26, 8:53 AM
While closing the gender gap is both righteous as economically advantageous, I find the claim that the world could not be fed without it totally unfounded and not true. Even the worst dictator could just redistribute the produce currently wasted and the issue would be solved with gender issues left touched. The intention of this message is great but I think from a communications point of view these kinds of exaggerated messages undermine the basis of campaigns and ultimately wear off the attention of your target groups.
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AP Human Geography FRQs

AP Human Geography FRQs | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Based upon student reactions to their multiple choice exams, I can tell that the types of questions are NOT, 'choose the correct definition for the vocabulary term.' Instead, the types of questions are leading towards giving an example of a real world phenomenon and then requesting students to tell which term best applies. And though I have not seen an actual test, it sounds like the kids were saying that the questions require more reading than the answers (I would actually prefer that to the alternative)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2015 10:46 AM

This article (with the outstanding infographic above) from the Human Imprint is an excellent primer to get students ready for the APHG exam.    


TagsAPHG, infographic.  

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How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger | HMHS History | Scoop.it
About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste, often because of its looks. That’s enough to feed two billion people.

Via Seth Dixon
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Katerina Stojanovski's curator insight, March 10, 6:10 AM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

NADINE BURCHI SCORP's curator insight, March 10, 1:24 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 9:29 PM
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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."


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aitouaddaC's curator insight, May 2, 8:44 AM
On pourra voir aussi , en français  et en allemand :  http://ddc.arte.tv/nos-cartes/le-transport-maritime-coeur-de-la-mondialisation
South Florida Guide's curator insight, May 3, 11:40 AM
Very interesting.
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 10:25 PM
This resource shows great detail into where are products travel when they are imported but also shows us what and where Australian products are going. Good source in regards to showing how large Australia's export market is. Article contains a good amount of information as to why the routes shown on the map are taken as well as having in-depth data showing the different cargo on board ships. This data helps high light what different countries are renowned for in their exports as well as giving so information into why some countries are poorer than others when analysing their exports. Planned use within unit regarding the cost of Australian exports and its sustainability for the future.      
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220 years of US population changes in one map

Every 10 years, the Census Bureau calculates the exact center of the US population. Here's what that statistic shows about our history.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 1:46 PM

Every 10 years the centroid (the center of U.S. population) is calculated using the latest census data.  As the video above shows, the centroid has continued moved west throughout history, but in the last 60 years has moved to the south and west.  The recent shift to the south coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors) which opened up the Sun Belt.  In this article in Orion Magazine, Jeremy Miller discusses the historical shifts in the spatial patterns of the U.S. population and the history of the centroid.  you can listen to the podcast version of the article or a shorter podcast by NPR

 

Questions to Ponder:  Would the centroids of other countries be as mobile or predictable?  Why or why not?  What does the centroid tell us?

 

Tags: statistics, census, mappingmigration, populationhistoricalUSA.

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Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States

Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The graph and tables on this page attempt to show how the urban hierarchy of the United States has developed over time. The statistic used here is the population of the metropolitan area (contiguous urbanized area surrounding a central city), not the population of an individual city. Metropolitan area population is much more useful than city population as an indicator of the size and importance of a city, since the official boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary and often do not include vast suburban areas. For example, in 2000 San Antonio was the 10th largest city in the U.S., larger than Boston or San Francisco, but its Metro Area was only ranked about 30th. The same thing was happening even back in 1790: New York was the biggest single city, but Philadelphia plus its suburbs of Northern Liberties and Southwark made it the biggest metro area."


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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:29 AM

This information is a helpful illustrator for someone who knows about the geography and history of the United States.  It is important to note the use of "metropolitan populations" rather than "city populations" within particular city borders; as the creator states, "boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary".  In other words, the information that can be given from a "city" do not tell the whole story.  Metropolitan areas, even if spanning out of city borders, share similar local culture dynamics, industry, and infrastructure as the core city.  If one was to just examine the cities and not the entire metropolitan areas of the Northeast Megalopolis, they would be missing a huge part of the puzzle. Depending on the time period, the demanded resources, and the available technologies heavily influence how metropoloitan areas work, grow, and interact with others.   This can be seen in the charts and tables.  For example, the availability of the automobile and other transportation methods deeply affected how people and industry move and how metropolitan areas influence and interact with one another.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 10:26 AM

Comparing and contrasting numbers is a huge part of todays world. Looking at this chart, it indicates the size of the population of the whole metropolitan area. The difference in size of cities and of areas differs greatly and the examples provided can show how the area of a city is different that its Metro Area ranking.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:55 PM

I was a little confused by this graph at first, as I thought it was measuring population rather than the ranking of the respective metro areas. It is still just as telling, however, even if it is not measuring population. Despite the fact that the lines get a bit jumbled at times, it really is a fascinating graph to look at. It is representative of some tangible and traceable geographic trends that occurred as a result of politics or economics. It is especially interesting to note the decrease in rank of many northeastern metro areas and their replacement by metro areas in the western or central parts of the country. This is, of course, symbolic of the westward expansion of the country during the mid to early 1800s and the decline of the northeast as the dominant population center of the country. 

 

There are some things in particular that are interesting to note as an historian. For instance, New York's almost perfectly constant place as the largest metro area in the country says a lot about where the country is centered economically and socially. The rapid emergence of Los Angeles as a major metro area in the early 1900s speaks to the new wave of immigration that was occurring at that time. These trends, though not shown on or accompanied by a map, are very telling. Anyone with a basic knowledge of geography and U.S. history can see why certain things trend the way that they do. This graph also reinforces my belief that geography is an absolutely pivotal part of history. It is important to know where things are when you are talking about them in an historical context, or else you will have no visual reference or background and events may seem confusing or unclear. 

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The City Solution - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine

The City Solution - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Why cities are the best cure for our planet's growing pains...

 

Debate the merits of this quote from Edward Glaeser: "There's no such thing as a poor urbanized country; there's no such thing as a rich rural country."  Is this true?  Are there exceptions?  What explains these geographic patterns?  Is there a causal link between urbanization and economic development? 


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Climate Change, Disaster Mitigation and City Planning

TED Talks As Vicki Arroyo says, it's time to prepare our homes and cities for our changing climate, with its increased risk of flooding, drought and uncertainty.


Our major cities are suceptible to environmental catastrophes for a whole host of reasons.  Cities depend on a smooth of goods, money and services provided by infrastructure that we take for granted and assume will always work 24/7.  Presented in the video are some ideas about how we should rethink our cities with a different ecological paradigm to protect our cities more in the future. 


Tags: planning, urban ecology, environment adapt, sustainability.


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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:44 PM

Governements around the world are slowly but surely creating new plans to ensure the safety of the people. They have already worked on evacuation plans and tranportation for getting people out but, they also need to think about where would people go and how will they adapt to their new enviornment. I'm glad that some places started working on plans to build houses, highways, and churches at a higher elevation, but other countries also need help figuring this stuff out. They need a solution to better secure homes and lives. Everyone needs to work together to prepare for climate change and natural disasters, especially those places where are most likely to hit.

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What is a Leap Year?

Help support videos like this: http://www.cgpgrey.com/subbable **CGPGrey T-Shirts for sale!**: http://goo.gl/1Wlnd Grey's blog: http://www.cgpgrey.com/blog/ ...
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Human impact has pushed Earth into the Anthropocene, scientists say

Human impact has pushed Earth into the Anthropocene, scientists say | HMHS History | Scoop.it
New study provides one of the strongest cases yet that the planet has entered a new geological epoch

 

Tags: Anthropocene, development,  land use, environment, environment modify.  


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Sally Egan's curator insight, February 21, 4:30 PM

Good discussion for syllabus dotpoint Human impacts on ecosystems within the HSC topic Ecosystems at Risk.

Andrea J Galan's curator insight, February 22, 6:58 PM

I chose to add this article into my folder because it talks about earth entering a new geological epoch. This is exciting yet scary news because it's mostly pollution that justifies /proves the new epoch. The news is exciting because it's something that we are currently experiencing. The evidence that proves the geological epoch on the other hand is terrifying. It just goes to show how awful we have been treating our planet like if the next generation is going to be finding fossils in plastic bags that is a problem.

nukem777's curator insight, June 2, 7:21 AM
Thought we were still officially in the Holocene...did I miss a memo?
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Opinion: Sadly, Malthus was right. Now what?

Opinion: Sadly, Malthus was right. Now what? | HMHS History | Scoop.it
We seem bound to learn the hard way that there really is a limit to how many people the Earth can support.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 26, 8:23 AM

Well stated!

From Seth Dixon - His insight:

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population. 

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 8:01 PM

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  


Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 


Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population. 

Danielle Yen's curator insight, March 10, 9:23 AM

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population. 

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The Global Food Waste Scandal

"TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources."


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:13 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.