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The Civil War Part 2: Crash Course US History #21 - YouTube

John Green teaches you the history of the United States of America in 46 episodes!
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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 8:09 AM

This video (like part 1) shows some great examples of how the political organization of space and administration of borders can get complicated.  Here are the examples (and time in the video when they are covered in the video) on these complex borders:


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, video.

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How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | HMHS History | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:46 PM

My uncles in Iowa grow corn for ethanol.  They have a small crop where they grow corn they consume.  It is literally the best corn I've ever had.  I'm actually surprised Rhode Island produces almost $4mil in sweet corn.  I'm amazed that Mass produces $100 mil in cranberries.  I've seen a few cranberry bogs close down.  We produce so much why can't we actually feed everyone?  

Diane Johnson's curator insight, January 28, 8:47 PM

Useful data for sustainability discussions

Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2:38 PM

These maps are interesting, in the fact that the heartland of the United States differs so much from either coast.  Both the coasts, as seen in the first map grow fruits and vegetables.  The center of the country grows wheat, and wheat is the dominant  crop of the country.  This might account for the reason why fruits and vegetables are more expensive than grain based products.  The second map helps to drive home this point even further, of how different the coasts are from the heartland.  What I also thought was funny, however, was the author's comment that it looks like an electoral map.  Perhaps, the reason heartland states tend to side with each other and republicans is because of shared interests in the political arena.

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Brazil's ethanol revolution

"United Nations, June 2008 - The bio-fuel, ethanol, is generating a revolution in renewable energy that could help reduce the world's thirst for oil. In Brazil, the production of ethanol from sugarcane is booming, but what is not clear is the impact it is having on the industry's sugarcane cutters."  Transcript of video available here.


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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:38 PM

Brazil's ethanol revolution is showing how the country is using its agriculture to help out its economy, but with the increase in cane production comes the laying off of all the manual cutters. Essentially, the countries success in ethanol production is resulting in job loss for the workers that made the production of ethanol as popular as it.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:32 AM

This video highlights one of the negative impacts of globalization and economic development. As a country grows and become more economically powerful, the effects of success often outpaces the poorer classes of its society. Ethanol production has become an established and important part of Brazil's economy, and its success has begun to create negative social impacts. As the ethanol business continues to grow the more it relies on heavy machinery and other technology to maintain it, and the less the low-skilled manual laborers are needed. In order to avoid larger social problems, the government and ethanol companies in Brazil will need to find ways to integrate their already existing labor force into the expanding ethanol industry.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:04 PM

Brazil is one of the only countries in the world that is no longer dependent on oil. Increased sugarcane production has allowed for the large production of the bio-fuel ethanol, and now the country no longer really needs to export oil from other countries. This will allow Brazil to no longer be dependent on other countries or corporations for oil, and it could potentially lead to Brazil exporting ethanol and making a profit. 

 

On the other hand, many worry about how the switch from manual labor to mechanized production will affect the workers. Large lay offs could result in more people moving to the cities in order to find work, thus creating more slums. Luckily, the government is attempting to make jobs within the bustling bio-fuel business in order keep people employed.

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▶ The Anthropocene and the Near Future: Crash Course Big History #9 - YouTube

Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! Visit http://dft.ba/-CCWHDVD to buy a set for your home or classroom. You can directly support Crash Cour...
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Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2014 3:32 PM

This is a good video to explain globalization (although this is my personal favorite), to see that it not just an economic force, but one that touches just about every facet of modern life.
 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:24 AM

Globalization in a Nutshell

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

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Yardstick of Wealth

"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in ways we barely understand – often for the better."


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Kibet Koskei's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:19 AM

ATTENTION !
Get Paid To Enlighten African Youth On How To Use The Internet To Grow Rich ! Re: Ref:Jobs Are Moving Online, Lets Us Help You Acquire The Skills Of 21st Century and Help You To Be A head Of the Masses in Getting Online Jobs!
http://www.firstandfastcapital.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=690&Itemid=623

Sue Bicknell's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:37 AM

Another fantastic presentation by Rosling

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:27 AM

Rosling does a great job speaking of poverty and population. This would be an awesome text to use in a unit about poverty. This can be incorporated in a history class, economics class, sociology class, even an anthropology class if it is offered in highschools. 

It is a perfect length video that can be used to introduce a writing assignment, a research project, or an in class group assignment. But it also shows the extremety of poor vs. rich. From what I have seen students like to state their opinions about issues like this. Teachers may have to watch out how they introduce this into their topic or discussion, but it is a worthwhile source to use. 

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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.


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Keegan Johns's curator insight, August 27, 2014 10:01 AM

I think it is good for them to see and taste chocolate because they work very hard to grow and harvest the beans, but don't even know what they are used for. These people deserve to know what they are helping create because they work so hard and don't get paid that much for it.

 

-KJ

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:39 PM

Sad how the people who do the hard work so often enjoy the fruit of their labour.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:03 PM

It's interesting and fascinating to see how the workers that harvest the cocoa bean are so excited about the results of their hard work. Having grown up, our entire lives we have been exposed to chocolate and have taken it for granted, but seeing the men who gather the beans enjoy chocolate so much was cool because they did not know what the bean was being used for and seeing their hard work make something sweet is a nice surprise for them. Due to chocolate being expensive in Ivory Coast, the people can not enjoy the fruits of their labor as much as they would like, but shows how home grown products can't be enjoyed by those that make them.

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The Greatest Invention?

"What was the greatest invention of the industrial revolution? Hans Rosling makes the case for the washing machine. With newly designed graphics from Gapminder, Rosling shows us the magic that pops up when economic growth and electricity turn a boring wash day into an intellectual day of reading."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 11, 2014 3:58 PM

What one invention has made the greatest difference in the lives of people all around the world?  The case can be made for the washing machine; it has been a major tool in transforming the lives of women and restructuring gender roles in industrialized societies. 


Tags: gapminder, poverty gendertechnology, industry, development, TED.

Kelli Jones's curator insight, October 19, 2014 5:41 PM

I think that it is really interesting how something that almost everybody in todays society has and uses and doesn't really think about, can be described as a "miracle" to some people.

Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:32 PM

unarguably one of the greatest inventions of mankind.

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-stan by your land

Central Asia is full of lands whose names end in -stan. A certain powerful North American country has a related name. How? It's not your standard explanation...

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Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 21, 7:21 AM

Summary- In this video, it explains way so many easter countries end in -stan. Pakistan, Turkistan, and Kyrgyzstan are all examples of this. Turns our, -stan is the persian word for country. Thats why all the countries neighboring Iran have all been influenced by this, with -stan as the last part of the country name. Iran also havs -stans within its borders as well. There are also places ending is -stan which aren't part of the origin 7 -stans. Independence movements, historical regions, and administrative regions and in -stan as well. 

 

Insight - In unit 3, one of the the main things we study is why are places named what they are and why do languages diffuse. In this case, all these places are named what they are because of the ethnic group living in that area is defying their territory as a state(country). I saw the -stan diffusion as a form of contagious diffusion. It kept spreading outward from Iran to a lot of states north east of it. 

Tyler Anson's curator insight, January 21, 10:15 AM

This video goes to explain why so many countries in the middle east end in the root -stan. It goes back to show how the root diffused from proto-indo-european root, 'to stand'. -stan simply means 'a place where one stays' and is Persian. Therefore, the nations in the Middle East were given their names by Persian geographers with the ending   -stan in the same way that the nations in Europe were given names by English Geographers using the root -land (Finland, Poland, etc)

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:10 PM

unit 2

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The Best of 2014 GeoEd Style

The Best of 2014 GeoEd Style | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The best 30 resources and posts on Geography Education from 2014." http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 28, 2014 4:15 PM

'Tis the season to look back on the year that was.  There are some 'Best of' lists with great teaching applications produced this week such as the best satellite images of 2014, the worst natural disasters of 2014, and 50 states in 50 pictures.  This committee of one has analyzed all the Geography Education resources shared this year and selected these 30 as the best, most important, or most useful resources from 2014.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, December 29, 2014 5:48 PM

The best from the BEST!

Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 5, 9:19 AM

'Tis the season to look back on the year that was.  There are some 'Best of' lists with great teaching applications produced this week such as the best satellite images of 2014, the worst natural disasters of 2014, and 50 states in 50 pictures.  Our Alliance Coordinator has analyzed all the Geography Education resources he shared this year and selected these 30 as the best, most important, or most useful resources from 2014.

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U.S. and Cuba's Rocky Relations

"President Obama announced on December 17 that the United States will resume diplomatic relations with Cuba after more than 50 years of antagonism. Bloomberg's Sam Grobart recaps the standoff between the two nations, and explains why the icy relationship has begun to thaw."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 18, 2014 12:38 PM

By now I'm sure you've heard the news that the United States is seeking to normalize relations with Cuba and politicians are reacting to this news in diverse ways.  Some see this as a way for the United States to stick it to Russia (which is going through it's on troubles--more on that in the future). This video gives a quick rundown of the history of Cold War tensions between these two neighbors.   


Tags: Cuba, conflict, political, geopolitics.

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Name That Grid!

Name That Grid! | HMHS History | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 12:06 AM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this one that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         


Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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HumdeBut's curator insight, January 29, 4:15 AM

pas vraiment à jour, mais les comparaisons sont souvent étonnantes !

Emma Boyle's curator insight, January 30, 10:25 AM

Also try "If It Were My Home"

HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, Today, 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

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The Data-Driven Farm

"Mr. Tom is as much a chief technology officer as he is a farmer. Where his great-great-grandfather hitched a mule, 'we’ve got sensors on the combine, GPS data from satellites, cellular modems on self-driving tractors, apps for irrigation on iPhones,' he said.

The demise of the small family farm has been a long time coming. But for farmers like Mr. Tom, technology offers a lifeline, a way to navigate the boom-and-bust cycles of making a living from the land. It is also helping them grow to compete with giant agribusinesses."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 3, 2014 4:42 PM

The New York Times article associated with the video above offers a great glimpse into the inner works of how agribusiness technologies have transformed the American family farm.  


Tags: agriculture, food production, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.

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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 22, 11:56 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 3:11 PM

The reason why most of Africa and southern Asia has a low Human Development Index is because Africa and southern Asia has a high homelessness rate in comparison to other places and also, their economy is not as strong as Russia's, United States' or Europe's. It is cliché that Africa is mostly known for it's natural environments. Also, the Urban population in Africa is not as much as the Urban population in North America, South America, Europe, Russia and Australia.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 30, 10:23 AM

A bit old, but still useful info...

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▶ The Agricultural Revolution: Crash Course World History #1 - YouTube

Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! Visit http://dft.ba/-CCWHDVD to buy a set for your home or classroom. You can directly support Crash Cour...
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Infant Mortality Rates

Infant Mortality Rates | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Are All Mothers Created Equal? From the State of the World's Mothers 2012 report see how mothers locations have an impact on the life and death of their children.

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Gender Empowerment and Education

"In this exclusive, unedited interview, 'I Am Malala' author Malala Yousafzai remembers the Taliban's rise to power in her Pakistani hometown and discusses her efforts to campaign for equal access to education for girls. Malala Yousafzai also offers suggestions for people looking to help out overseas and stresses the importance of education."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 19, 2014 4:37 PM

For younger audiences, hearing someone their own age discuss educational opportunities (or the lack thereof) based on gender can leave a profound impression. Today, Malala is a Nobel Peace Prize winner (deservedly so), as she's become an icon in her own right as she champions developmental opportunities for girls in cultures that historically have not had equal offerings for young women.  Watch this documentary to see who she was before she was thrust into the international spotlight, and hear her father's perspective.  Some, however, only see this as Western hypocrisy.    


Tags: developmentpoverty, gender, Pakistanmedia.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, October 10, 2014 11:07 AM

A great video highlighting how lucky we are to be able to get an education, free of cost, without it being denied based on any qualifications. And from the mouth of a 16 year old.

analise moreno's curator insight, October 14, 2014 8:01 PM

This was one of our focuses last chapter. I totally agree with this because woman and as well as men deserve education they need education to have a successful life. I like how she describes this so well and thoroughly she talks about what she wants and needs in her life.

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Women & Agriculture

"In this Feed the Future video, narrator Matt Damon discusses the importance of increasing food production around the world and notes the importance of equipping women with the right tools, training, and  technology to see as much as a 30 percent increase in food production. To feed our growing population we need to increase food production by 70 percent before 2050. Women make up the majority of the agricultural workforce in many areas of the world."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:03 PM

A colleague mine thought that the ideas in this video were so obvious and non-controversial, he said, "Why does this even need to be stated? Why would we exclude women from agriculture?"  The simple answer is that it wouldn't need to be stated if women around the world did have equal access to resources.  For many of the world's poor, this is where the rubber meets the road. 


Tags: developmentgender, agriculture, food production, labor.

AckerbauHalle's curator insight, December 23, 2014 12:37 AM

Für die zukünftige Ernährung der Welt gibt es einen oft übersehenen Faktor: Gleichberechtigung von Frauen. Frauen sind in vielen Ländern für die Arbeit auf den Feldern verantwortlich. Gleichzeitig haben sie keine Rechte am Land und sind schlecht ausgebildet und - wenn überhaupt - schlecht bezahlt. 

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In an Ideal World...

In an Ideal World... | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Tags: art, fun.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:09 PM

unit 1ish  :)

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 26, 8:45 PM

I am absolutely fascinated by Earth's Physical Environments. What I like specifically about this map and most maps for that matter is that you won't find a lot of comfortable environments that introduce you to many environmental areas in real life. As long as I have the survival skills, I would love to live in a place where I can know what are Earth's Physical Environments.

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Without mental maps, we’re lost

Without mental maps, we’re lost | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Elwood was a senior geographer working on the ground-floor of the very global positioning systems (GPS) and geographic information systems (GIS) he will throw up for discussion in his TEDx talk.

His question: Are we surrendering our innate mental map making abilities to technology and relying on and trusting it too much? And for TEDx audiences only, he’ll toss out ideas on ways to prevent that from happening.

 

Tags: mapping, GPS, cartography, TED, 201.


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Chris Carter's comment, January 5, 7:34 PM
I had the pleasure to participate in Dr. Judy Willis'
(neuroscientist/MS teacher) ( RADTeach.com) keynote address at 21st Century learning in Hong Kong last month, and was further blessed to interview her for my Ed Tech podcast. A point she made that has stuck with me is that graphic organizers/mental maps are like having a second brain. Why would we not take advantage of them?
Chris Carter's curator insight, January 5, 7:35 PM

I had the pleasure to participate in Dr. Judy Willis'
(neuroscientist/MS teacher) ( RADTeach.com) keynote address at 21st Century learning in Hong Kong last month, and was further blessed to interview her for my Ed Tech podcast. A point she made that has stuck with me is that graphic organizers/mental maps are like having a second brain. Why would we not take advantage of them?

Jeff Cherry's curator insight, January 12, 9:08 AM

The mind is a terrible thing to waste.

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Brazil and Europe

Brazil and Europe | HMHS History | Scoop.it

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Beatrice J. P. Vasconcelos's curator insight, January 8, 4:34 PM

Grande!

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 4:24 PM

I just looked up the map for Brazil in comparison to Europe and I looked up the population for the two. Europe looks a lot bigger than Brazil but that could be the shapes of Brazil in comparison to Europe messing with what I see. Also, Europe looks bigger than Brazil because there are some areas in Europe that are just water and the prorupted and elongated countries of Europe (such as Sweden and Norway) expands the distance of Europe. The total population for Brazil is 200,000,000 and the population for Europe is 742,000,000. However, with Russia not being in this Brazil and Europe map, the population would go down to 699,000,000. To sum it up, Europe is slightly, just slightly bigger than Brazil.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, January 28, 9:32 PM

I knew Brazils land area was large but this puts it in another perspective.  It does make me wonder what if the large area of Brazil that is taken up by the Amazon was not tropical rain forrest and was completely inhabited and industrialized.  Would Brazil be over-populated and on the poorer side like Mexico is or would it be a thriving country like the United States?