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If you’re on the beach, this map shows you what’s across the ocean

If you’re on the beach, this map shows you what’s across the ocean | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The map above shows the countries that are due east and west from points along the coasts of North and South America. Many small island nations are (perhaps unfairly) excluded for ease of reading. Many thanks to Eric Odenheimer for sharing the map with Know More.
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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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What would happen if humans became extinct?


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 4:37 PM

What would Earth be like if all humans suddenly disappeared? This question posed on the YouTube series Earth Unplugged, has many intriguing ecological and biogeographic ramifications that are worth considering to explore how systems are interconnected. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, video.

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The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | HMHS History | Scoop.it
How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 11:58 AM

The recent Newsweek Cover showing a Chimpanzee for the article, Smuggled Bushmeat Is Ebola's Back Door to America, has received a lot of criticism for being factually inaccurate, but also for it's portrayal of Africa that taps into deep-rooted cultural anxieties about Africa in United States.  Western writers have use many cultural conventions to talk about "the Dark Continent" stemming from a long colonial tradition.  Africa had been developing rapidly in the last decade and how Ebola fares seems to be a referendum on the continent for many cultural commentators.  This great Washington Post article is less about Ebola, but uses the outbreak to analyze how we think about Africa, and sometimes it isn't a pretty reflection.  The Ebola outbreak is teaching us how we perceive Africa as much as it is about Africa itself.

 

Tags: Ebola, Africacolonialism, regions, perspective.

Sharolyn S. Griffith's curator insight, October 17, 10:23 AM

Well stated, Seth Dixon!

Christian Allié's curator insight, October 18, 3:33 AM

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............... 

The Newsweek story could generate additional prejudice against African migrants, a population that already suffers from greater prejudice than other immigrant groups. In the psychology study referenced above, researchers found that simply manipulating the geographical origin of a hypothetical immigrant group – from Eastern Africa to Eastern Asia to Eastern Europe — yielded significant differences in attitudes in a study population toward the immigrant group.

 

Fear-mongering narratives about Ebola circulating in the popular media can also have a serious effect on knowledge and attitudes about Ebola. Though there are no cases of person-to-person infection in the United States, a recent poll conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health reports 39 percent of Americans think there will be a large Ebola outbreak in the United States and more than a quarter of Americans are concerned that they or someone in their immediate family may get sick with Ebola in the next year. A similar poll conducted for Reason-Rupe had four in 10 Americans saying an Ebola outbreak in the United States was likely, and conservative Americans were more likely to say an outbreak was likely. These two national surveys show Americans are grossly overestimating their risk of infection.

 

The long history of associating immigrants and disease in America and the problematic impact that has on attitudes toward immigrants should make us sensitive to the impact of “othering” African immigrants to the United States in the midst of the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Scare-mongering about infinitesimally small risks in one context serves no purpose to the greater good of trying to curb disease transmission and relieve people’s suffering in another context.

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Coal, Steam, and The Industrial Revolution: Crash Course World History #32 - YouTube

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World Population Clock: 7 Billion People (2014) - Worldometers

World Population Clock: 7 Billion People (2014) - Worldometers | HMHS History | Scoop.it
How many people are there in the world? World population has reached 7 billion. World population live counter with data sheets, graphs, maps, and census data regarding the current, historical, and future world population figures, estimates, growth rates, densities and demographics
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Peak Oil: The End of the Oil Age

Peak Oil: The End of the Oil Age | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"It has taken between 50-300 million years to form, and yet we have managed to burn roughly half of all global oil reserves in merely 125 years or so."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 1:18 PM

Many who research natural resources and their production believe in peak oil.  Peak oil is defined as the maximum rate of the production of oil in any area under consideration, recognizing that it is a finite natural resource, subject to depletion.  In essence, oil will run out some day because it is a non-renewable resources; so oil production will peak, and then permanently decline.  Some are skeptical of these claims and feel that the oil industry is in a much stronger position than peak oil proponents suggest.


Tagsenergy, resources, environment, environment modifyclimate change, political ecology.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 8, 1:47 PM

the fact that oil is doomed is not such a bad thing perhaps fracking but I believe that solar energy is the way of the future

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 4:28 AM

Peak Oil: The End of the Oil Age

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The Most Complex International Borders in the World

"In this video I look at some of the most complex international border. Of course, there are more complex borders in the world, but this video looks at some of my favourites."


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ELAdvocacy's curator insight, October 3, 9:40 AM

There are so many reasons our immigrant students come to the United States.  Some stories are so complex and painful it can be extremely difficult for Americans to understand.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 3, 10:21 PM

Interesting!

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 5:39 AM

The Most Complex International Borders in the World

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How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

Via Seth Dixon
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Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, October 7, 1:32 AM

is enough commitment shown by the developed countries, I dont think so.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 7, 4:24 AM

How Ebola sped out of control

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 7, 9:53 AM

unit 1

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▶ The Science of Overpopulation - YouTube

Hank talks about the issues of rising global population. Like SciShow on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Follow SciShow on Twitter: http://www.twit...
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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, January 8, 10:59 AM

Key insight:  The number of children stopped growing in 1980.  Most of the world is now having only 2 children per family.  The reason why the adult population will continue to grow is just because it takes a generation to balance out the bubble of having more children that survive to grow up and have their own children.

Crooms Human Geography's curator insight, February 4, 1:11 PM

Population

Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 10:04 AM

Maybe the world  being overpopulated is a good thing. In the video it explains how all of our resources wont run out they will just need to be increased. The way we live and what we live off of is much different than what other people have to live off of.  We have all of these resources to spare that as people bring more children into this world we will have plenty to share. The world is a place to  farm,  to be able to provide for your families,  to live your everyday life without having to worry about dying from diseases. So if the world becomes overpopulated it will force people to move to a better inhabitant.

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

"A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on the equivalent scale to major geological processes."


Via Seth Dixon
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Diane Johnson's curator insight, September 22, 9:28 AM

More climate considerations

Olga Boldina's curator insight, September 24, 10:39 AM

добавить свой понимание ...

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, September 24, 11:55 AM

El Antropoceno,  nueva era geológica

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A Divided Class - Chapter 5 - How the Adults Reacted - YouTube

The PBS Video code for embedding into a webpage seems to be broken so I've uploaded the files here to mirror them.
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Rescooped by Michael Miller from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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Population pyramids


Via Allison Anthony
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Allison Anthony's curator insight, October 15, 11:52 AM

Good overview on how to read these graphs.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Map Fight

Map Fight | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 11, 3:02 PM

This simple WebApp allows the user to compare areas that are hard to compare on a map or globe because of distance or the map projection.  Competitive students love to hypothesize and then verify.  This helps strengthen student's mental maps and their ability to make regional comparisons. 


Tagsmapping K12, perspective, scale.

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▶ Food Is Weird: Understanding Agriculture in the Developing World - YouTube

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Science, development and the rebuilding of Rwanda

Science, development and the rebuilding of Rwanda | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Romain Murenzi: As Rwanda sought to rebuild after the horrors of the 1994 genocide, its development strategy emphasised science and technology. What lessons might this approach offer to other developing countries?
Michael Miller's insight:

A bunch of connections to topics we are discussing in class!!!  Look for links to data, maps, etc. in the article.

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World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production

World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The last section of dam is being blasted from the Elwha River on Washington's Olympic Peninsula on Tuesday.

 

For almost half a century, the two dams were widely applauded for powering the growth of the peninsula and its primary industry. But the dams blocked salmon migration up the Elwha, devastating its fish and shellfish—and the livelihood of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. As the tribe slowly gained political power—it won federal recognition in 1968—it and other tribes began to protest the loss of the fishing rights promised to them by federal treaty in the mid-1800s. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Washington tribes, including the Elwha Klallam, were entitled to half the salmon catch in the state.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 1:16 PM

See also this video to see the rapid changes on the nearby White Salmon River when they removed the dam. 


Tags: biogeography, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.

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Where Has All the Water Gone?

Where Has All the Water Gone? | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Once the fourth-largest lake in the world, Central Asia's shrinking Aral Sea has reached a new low, thanks to decades-old water diversions and a more recent drought." 


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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, October 8, 4:50 PM

The reason for this lake drying up so quickly is simply a result of lack of water getting to the lake. An endorheic basin is a body of water that doesn't leak into streams, lakes, or oceans. The water gets to this body of water evaporates or seeps into it. Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan have been using the water that goes into the lake and using it for fertilization of their crops. But that is basically pointless because when the lake dries up the salt is left. The salt can get blown onto the crops and basically kill the crops. It like the expression, "killing two birds with one stone," except not in the good way.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, October 10, 2:47 PM

The Aral Sea is drying. This was one of the four largest lakes in the world. A saltwater lake and now the water is evaporating and is getting even saltier because as the water evaporates into the atmosphere and minerals like salt left on the surface the remaining water is saltier. Something could be causing the water to dry but even if they know what is causing it to dry I think it is very difficult to stop it from getting dry. The water lost is quite difficult to recover and I think even if they fill the lake the water will still dry. some  potable water rivers are drying and now the big lakes like this too. I think that in the future we are going to have a water problem.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 17, 8:32 PM

The Aral Sea was at one time, one of the largest lakes in the world, but because of a recent drought that has affected the area. According to this article, The Aral Sea is also shrinking due “to decades-old water divisions”. The geography of the Aral Sea has also had an impact on the surrounding agricultural lands. The shrinking of the Aral Sea is having a larger than expected impact on Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan because of the receding water.

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Ebola easier to stop now than later

Help must come within weeks, or Ebola will require unimaginable resources. Data sources: http://nej.md/1wS4zeN & http://reliefweb.int/disaster/ep-2014-000041...

Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 12:36 PM

unit 1 diffusion!

Michael Mazo's curator insight, October 6, 2:54 PM

Ebola has been a growing concern for some time now. With its origin in Africa to its spreading throughout the world, people have become increasingly worried about contracting Ebola. With the initial diagnosis of the first patient infected with Ebola in the US, the CDC has been working constantly to prevent further spread of this infectious disease. Not only has this raised medical concerns, but as soon as the Ebola outbreak has entered the United States Biotechnology stocks began to rise. With the help of devices and programs stemming from Biotechnology there is great hope for eradicating the disease once and for all. Even healthcare workers are hesitant upon working with infected individuals, so hopefully biotech will enter with a grand entrance by providing materials or machinery to help prevent these workers from getting Ebola.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 16, 11:46 AM

Although Ebola is a disease that can be stopped now, different measures need to be taken now. With the vaccines that were administered to the Ebola aid workers that were working in the site of the outbreak, mass production of that vaccine should be created and made available to those who are believed to be infected with this parasite.

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Coming Soon: 12 Billion People on Earth - YouTube

SciShow News explains the science behind the latest virus outbreak in the U.S., and examines surprising new predictions about the future of the world’s human...
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The Big Bang: Crash Course Big History #1 - YouTube

In which John Green, Hank Green, and Emily Graslie teach you about, well, everything. Big History is the history of everything. We're going to start with the...
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A Divided Class - Chapter 3 - 14 Years Later - YouTube

The PBS Video code for embedding into a webpage seems to be broken so I've uploaded the files here to mirror them.
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