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If you’re on the beach, this map shows you what’s across the ocean

If you’re on the beach, this map shows you what’s across the ocean | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The map above shows the countries that are due east and west from points along the coasts of North and South America. Many small island nations are (perhaps unfairly) excluded for ease of reading. Many thanks to Eric Odenheimer for sharing the map with Know More.
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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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Using 'Geography Education'

Using 'Geography Education' | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"This story map was created with ArcGIS Online to guide users on how to get the most out of the Geography Education websites on Wordpress and Scoop.it."


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ROCAFORT's curator insight, September 23, 2016 2:47 AM
Using 'Geography Education'
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, December 3, 2016 9:33 PM
Just getting familiar with ArcGis and lots of ideas picked up at #ncss16
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Why do people and nations trade?

"Mark Blyth of Brown University explains international trade." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 5, 7:17 PM

To understand international trade, you need to understand how the factors of production vary from place to place, resulting in different locations having a comparative advantage on a global market.  This video nicely explains that with the example of Scotland’s comparative advantage raising sheep with southern Europe’s comparative advantage in producing wine.   Does the size of a country matter in trade?  You betcha.

 

Tags: regions, economic, diffusion, industry

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Lights of Human Activity Shine in NASA's Image of Earth at Night

NASA scientists have just released the first new global map of Earth at night since 2012. This nighttime look at our home planet, dubbed the Black Marble, provides researchers with a unique perspective of human activities around the globe. By studying Earth at night, researchers can investigate how cities expand, monitor light intensity to estimate energy use and economic activity, and aid in disaster response.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 1:35 PM

NASA scientists are releasing new global maps of Earth at night, providing the clearest yet composite view of the patterns of human settlement across our planet.  You can download the image at a good resolution (8 MB jpg) or at a great resolution (266 MB jpg) to explore at your leisure.  

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, images, geospatial.

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 19, 12:43 PM
A perenial favorite in the "human footprint" slideshows of a generation of environmental scientists.
Ivan Ius's curator insight, April 20, 12:19 PM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective, Spatial Significance
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The rise and fall of the world’s cities, mapped

The rise and fall of the world’s cities, mapped | HMHS History | Scoop.it
This video clip shows how cities developed around the world over 6 millennia
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Here's a map of what the NFL draft site will look like in Philadelphia

Here's a map of what the NFL draft site will look like in Philadelphia | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Entry points for the activities and services on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway during the April 27-29 NFL Draft. - Jonathan Tannenwald, Philadelphia Philly.com
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American Makeover Episode 2: SEASIDE, THE CITY OF IDEAS

Explore the city they call "the cradle of New Urbanism" with the man who helped design it 30 years ago, Andrés Duany. In Episode 2 of American Makeover
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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City

The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Walk on the streets and you´ll be exposed to its informal economy: people who do what they can to eke out a living including washing windshields, selling food, or even singing, dancing, and performing acrobatics for a tip.

What Americans may not know is that Mexico City is home to the wealthiest people, the poshest neighborhoods, the most exclusive shops, entertainment venues, and cultural centers on the planet.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 1, 2016 12:57 PM

Mexico City has been the economic center of Mexico for a long time and is a true primate city. "Wealth accumulation in Mexico City has historically been concentrated in the hands of a few. In colonial times, the elite was mostly composed of Spanish-born immigrants who held high-ranking offices or worked as business owners or export-oriented merchants. Later, the wealthy were those who owned large estates known as haciendas…It is estimated that around 40 percent of Mexico’s income is owned by just 10 percent of its population, while 52.3 percent of Mexican citizens live in poverty."

 

Tags: urban, megacitieseconomic, labor, Mexico.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 30, 2016 8:13 PM

Contrasts found in large cities 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 22, 11:08 AM
unit 6 and 7
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City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space?

City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space? | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Astronauts on the International Space Station took these images of cities at night. Note that up doesn’t necessarily mean north. All images: ESA/NASA

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 3:25 PM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this.  Here is another quiz that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         

 

Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 28, 8:44 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends
Alexander peters's curator insight, April 11, 9:07 AM
The article was about identifying city lights from the sky. I think that it was fun to do and guess them.
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5 TED talks that will change the way you think about Africa

5 TED talks that will change the way you think about Africa | HMHS History | Scoop.it
These thought-provoking TED talks will change the way you think about Africa in one hour. From the dangers of stereotyped perceptions of the continent, to entrepreneurship and business, to health and education, these 5 inspiring speakers have got you covered. Check them out!

Via Mr. David Burton
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Philly port is poised to get new cranes, bigger ships, more cargo, and more jobs

Philly port is poised to get new cranes, bigger ships, more cargo, and more jobs | HMHS History | Scoop.it
More cars, more containerized freight, and more cargo such as wood pulp and lumber will all be arriving on larger ships and creating more jobs. - Linda Loyd, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News
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Reefer Madness

Reefer Madness | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"There are around 6,000 cargo vessels out on the ocean right now, carrying 20,000,000 shipping containers, which are delivering most of the products you see around you. And among all the containers are a special subset of temperature-controlled units known in the global cargo industry, in all seriousness, as reefers.

70% of what we eat passes through the global cold chain, a series of artificially-cooled spaces, which is where the reefer comes into play."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2015 3:05 PM

I have written in the past about how containerization has remade the world we live in, but not much about the role of the refrigerated container (reefer).  So many economic geographies and agricultural geographies in the our consumer-based society hinge of this technological innovation.  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content.  


Tags: transportationfood distributiontechnology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, podcast.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:19 PM

An interesting addition to any study of global trade connections 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:06 AM

I have written in the past about how containerization has remade the world we live in, but not much about the role of the refrigerated container (reefer).  So many economic geographies and agricultural geographies in the our consumer-based society hinge of this technological innovation.  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content.  


Tags: transportation, food distribution, technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, podcast.

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How the Division of Knowledge Saved My Son's Life

In this video, Professor Boudreaux explains how the specialization of knowledge helped his two-year old son overcome a life-threatening illness. The scienc
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Boston schools ditch conventional world maps in favor of this one

Boston schools ditch conventional world maps in favor of this one | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Social studies classrooms throughout the Boston public school system are getting an upgrade some 448 years in the making.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 2:21 PM

Personally, I'm not a fan of this decision, but it's as if they watched the classic West Wing clip and decided to roll with it. I think that the Peters projection map is better than the Mercator for most educational applications, but it isn't the "right, best, or true" map projection.  Many viral videos comparing the two love to exaggerate and say things like "The maps you use are lying to you" or "the world is nothing like you've ever seen."  Yes, Mercator maps distorts relative size, but it isn't a "wrong" map anymore than the Peters projection.  All maps have distortion and map readers need to under that all maps are a mathematical representation of the Earth.  

 

Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspectiveeducation, geography, geography educationBoston.

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How Cookiecutter Sharks Eat Is Terrifying

Do not be fooled by its adorable name—the cookiecutter shark attacks by suctioning its lips to the flesh of its victims, spins, and ejects a cylindrical plug of flesh from its prey!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 2, 2:04 PM

This is the most delightfully fun video about one of the creepiest critters of the deep. 

 

Tags: water, biogeography, environment, physical, National Geographic.

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First 'Silk Road' train from Britain leaves for China - Times of India

First 'Silk Road' train from Britain leaves for China - Times of India | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The 32-container train, around 600 metres (yards) long, will go through the Channel Tunnel before travelling across France, Belgium, Germany, Poland, Belarus, Russia and Kazakhstan before heading into China.

Via Kenneth Carnesi,JD, talkingdrumnigeria, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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American Makeover Trailer for Episode 3 & Promo for CNU 24 - The Spirit of Detroit

American Makeover is excited to release the trailer for episode 3 and the promo video for CNU24 (June 8-11, 2016) --The Spirit of Detroit. The film is i
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American Makeover Episode 1: SPRAWLANTA

American Makeover is a six-part web series on new urbanism, the antidote to sprawl. Subscribe to this channel, find us on facebook, and get more info a
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Urbanization and Megacities: Jakarta

"This case study examines the challenges of human well-being and urbanization, especially in the megacity of Jakarta."


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:25 PM

It is nice to see an organization that is not just blindly giving resources to people in need but actually empowering them and training them to be able to get the things they need through work. The women in this story describe how they have learned to make and sell things in order to take care of their families and they describe how empowering that feels.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:11 AM

mega cities Jakarta

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 6:53 AM

Megacities are beginning to populate the entire globe. In the developing world, more and more megacities are beginning to form. Jakarta Indonesia is an example of a rising megacity. This rapid urbanization has placed a special burden on the resources and local economies of many developing nations. This areas are not prepared to deal with the rapid population growth associated with the development of a megacity. This strain placed on the local areas, will often lead to terrible living conditions for the lower classes of society. Sanitation will often become a major issue in many of these megacities. Large portions of the population will often lack a proper sanitation system. The lack of proper sanitation will lead to the onset of deadly diseases. The effects of rapid urbanization can be deadly, for those living in the pooper regions of society.

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Why Cities Are Where They Are

Try Squarespace free for 14 days and receive 10% off your order: http://www.squarespace.com/wendover (Code: Wendover) Support Wendover Productions o
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Natural Gas: The Energy to Move Forward

At ConocoPhillips, we share in the growing optimism that natural gas will play an important role in establishing a balanced, sustainable energy future
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Mr. Varley's AP Human Geography Website | Nothing like an AP HuG — GO LINKS!

Mr. Varley's AP Human Geography Website | Nothing like an AP HuG — GO LINKS! | HMHS History | Scoop.it
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Jen Denton Wilson's curator insight, March 22, 5:41 AM
Great resources!
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Top 20 most inspiring TED videos about maps and geography - Geoawesomeness

Top 20 most inspiring TED videos about maps and geography - Geoawesomeness | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Tweet Share on Facebook Share Share Email Pin Pocket Flipboard TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) is an amazing initiative that organizes events where inspiring people share their inspiring research, work and ideas. For the upcoming holidays we’ve rounded up 20 of the most inspirational and interesting TED talks about maps and geography out there. No matthew if …

Via Mr. David Burton
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Planet Money's T-Shirt Project

Planet Money's T-Shirt Project | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Planet Money followed the making of a simple cotton t-shirt through the global economy. From Mississippi to Indonesia to Bangladesh to Colombia and back to the U.S. Listen to the stories here.
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Enabling Globalization: The Container

Enabling Globalization: The Container | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The ships, railroads, and trucks that transport containers worldwide form the backbone of the global economy. The pace of globalization over the last sixty years has accelerated due to containers; just like canals and railroads defined earlier phases in the development of a global economy. While distance used to be the largest obstacle to regional integration, these successive waves of transportation improvements have functionally made the world a smaller place. Geographers refer to this as the Space-Time Convergence."


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:19 PM

Containers are part of globalization. It saves time and allows for extra space to store more products. Also, it is easier to handle using ships, railroad, and trucks while also facilitating more quality in terms of safety. However, on the other hand, with the creation of these containers employ mainly the use of technology which, unfortunately, downsizes the workforce. This, as a result, increases the unemployment rate for citizens. Although, when it comes to recycling, the idea of making houses with these containers helps families in diverse ways such as decreased costs, energy efficiency, and very short construction time. Containers have shaped the concept of shipping and living for many years, impacting regions with more business and expansion trades around the world.

Cody Price's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:57 PM

This article describes the basics of globalization and what technology really allowed globalization to spread, the shipping the container. It allowed thing to be shipped organized and more efficiently. These containers fit together perfectly. It helps ideas and products transport all over the world and spread pop culture. 

 

This relates to the idea in unit 3 of globalization. These shipping container allow ideas and products to be shipped all over the world. The shipping container was the key to better connecting the world. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:14 AM

I've posted here several resources about the global economy and the crucial role that containers play in enabling globalization.  In this article for National Geographic Education, I draw on many of these to to put it all in one nice container.  


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.