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Maps of Panem - The Hunger Games

Maps of Panem - The Hunger Games | HMHS History | Scoop.it
From The Hunger Games trilogy: different perspectives on the country of Panem.

Via Seth Dixon
Michael Miller's insight:

This is great, check out the different (all imagined) geographical differences!

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Cam E's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:50 PM

An interesting imagination of the Districts in the Hunger Games and where they might be in North America (excluding Cental American and the Carribean). All of these seem to come from some sort of common sense perspective based on the actual products from each region. We can see that the region which produces Electronics would be the geographical equivilent to California, which is well known for their technology within the Silicon Valley region. Some of these regions elude my minimal knowledge in Geography, and I can only guess at their purpose. Could the Luxury Item District be a tongue-in cheek joke about Las Vegas? Or even Hollywood? The "Peacekeepers" district being centered somewhat near Texas and the border with Mexico makes me wonder if it's placed there because of our border fence with Mexico.

Gabbie J's curator insight, May 9, 2014 8:16 PM

If you have ever read the Hunger Games series , then you were probably curious on where the districts are located. These are some interpretations that other people have made to try and fulfill the Hunger Games fans needs for a conclusion . You could even see what district you would live in if you lived in Panem. 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:32 PM

I have never seen this movie, however my sister is very intelligent with every aspect of it. Panem is the country in which The Hunger Games takes place in both the book and the film. The country is separated into thirteen districts until the rebellion, reducing the number to twelve. Each district has their own job, as shown in this image. For example, one district promotes fishing, another agriculture, and also electricity. As one can see from this map, all the districts are shaped like the United States. According to my sister, Panem is classified as being the future United States. This is an interesting aspect if we think about it. One might think that from looking at this and knowing that it is going to be the "future US", that it appears that everyone will slowly drift apart and do their own thing. Everyone may end up being their own "district" in the future.  

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Story Map Tour - Place Based Geography Videos

Story Map Tour - Place Based Geography Videos | HMHS History | Scoop.it
This story map was created with the Esri Map Tour application in ArcGIS Online.
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Prince Charles meets Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams - BBC News

Prince Charles meets Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams - BBC News | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Prince Charles meets Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams in a major conciliatory step in the Northern Ireland peace process.
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Private jets flooding the Las Vegas airport before the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight

Private jets flooding the Las Vegas airport before the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The airport is reportedly closed to private jets.

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 12:53 PM

In a world where money grants you certain access and privilege, this is what happens when many seek to leverage their privilege simultaneously only to realize that they have to get in line like the common folks too.


In the Pixar Movie the Incredibles, Mrs. Incredible exasperately tells her son, "Everyone is special, Dash."  Dash grumbles under his breath and replies, "Which is another way of saying no one is." 


Tags: transportationclass.

Christian Faltado Cantos's curator insight, May 5, 9:54 PM

Here what boxing and money can do....

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Ep. 2 of 5 - Division of Labor: Burgers and Ships - YouTube

In this series, Professor Don Boudreaux explores the question economists have been asking since the era of Adam Smith -- what creates wealth? On a timeline o...
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Ep. 1 of 5 - The Hockey Stick of Human Prosperity - YouTube

Marginal Revolution University is a new approach to online education led by Professors Tyler Cowen and Alex Tabarrok of George Mason University and the popul...
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Living in the Age of Airplanes

"LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world." airplanesmovie.com


Via Seth Dixon, AP US History
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majorlever's comment, May 1, 11:28 PM
Cool
majorlever's comment, May 1, 11:29 PM
Good one
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 2, 11:57 PM

global interconnections!!

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The United States' Geographic Situation

The Greater Mississippi Basin is the United States' core and serves as the underpinning of its role as a global superpower. For more analysis, visit: http://...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 23, 4:36 PM

I wouldn't use the word "core" to describe America's breadbasket, simply because of the economic core/periphery connotations.  Other than that, this video highlights some aspects of U.S. regional geography that I cover every semester.  1) The United States is bi-coastal on the two most important oceans for global trade.  2) Between those coasts is a large agricultural region overlayed on the most navigable river network.  These two basic facts go a long way in explaining the United States' position in global affairs.


Tags: USA. regions.

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, April 20, 8:51 PM

Think about the units and topics  we've covered this year. Migration, urbanization, development, and geo-political theories. Use examples from all of the above to justify the statement that the geography of the United States is responsible for its role as a global superpower.

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Sixty Languages at Risk of Extinction in Mexico—Can They Be Kept Alive?

Sixty Languages at Risk of Extinction in Mexico—Can They Be Kept Alive? | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Sixty of Mexico's native languages are at risk of being silenced forever—but many people are working to keep them alive, experts say.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 12:02 PM

If a language dies, an entire culture dies. Every year more and more languages and threatened and it gets worse as more people try to keep up with the demand of globalization. "Mexico isn't the only country losing its voices: If nothing is done, about half of the 6,000-plus languages spoken today will disappear by the end of this century."  Endangered Languages are going to be all the more common.  


TagsMexico, language, folk cultures, culture, globalization.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 9:10 AM

Mexico has been home to thousands of tribes and now many of the languages that existed in them are slowly dissipating.

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An earthquake felt across South Asia

An earthquake felt across South Asia | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The magnitude-7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal on Saturday morning destroyed parts of Kathmandu, trapped many people under rubble and killed more than 2,500 people. It was the worst to hit the country since a massive 1934 temblor killed more than 8,000."


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Ana Carlott G. Ares's curator insight, April 28, 10:52 AM

añada su visión ...

Joshua Mason's curator insight, April 29, 11:04 AM

It's absolutely devastating what happened to Nepal. Any loss of life is a tragedy but loss of this scale is unimaginable. It's going to be a difficult rebuilding process for the Nepalese whether that's coping with the loss or physically rebuilding the nation.

 

Watching footage of shakes, what struck me the most was hundreds of year old temples crumbling. Those just aren't something you can easily rebuild. The building can eventually be replaced but the significance of it is almost lost. 

 

Those temples, like the homes in the area, were most likely not built up to a standard that could withstand earthquakes or at least earthquakes of this magnitude. It's easy to see how destruction on this scale can occur in large urban populations that were not designed to stand against such a dramatic event.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 3:59 PM

I've experienced earthquakes more times than I've ever felt the need.  We used to get them all the time it seemed in Japan.  My bed would role across the room.  It got to the point where I just slept through them.  If I had even felt a shake half as violent as what Nepal went through I could not even imagine the fright.  I wonder how long the India and Eurasia tectonic plates will stay on top of each other?  Or if a few more earth quakes will split the area?  

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AP Human Geography FRQs

AP Human Geography FRQs | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Based upon student reactions to their multiple choice exams, I can tell that the types of questions are NOT, 'choose the correct definition for the vocabulary term.' Instead, the types of questions are leading towards giving an example of a real world phenomenon and then requesting students to tell which term best applies. And though I have not seen an actual test, it sounds like the kids were saying that the questions require more reading than the answers (I would actually prefer that to the alternative)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 10:46 AM

This article (with the outstanding infographic above) from the Human Imprint is an excellent primer to get students ready for the APHG exam.    


TagsAPHG, infographic.  

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1989 Raw Video: Man vs. Chinese tank Tiananmen square - YouTube

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Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities

Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Beginning in the 1950s, cities demolished thousands of homes in walkable neighborhoods to make room for freeways.

 

At the time, this was seen as a sign of progress. Not only did planners hope to help people get downtown more quickly, they saw many of the neighborhoods being torn down as blighted and in need of urban renewal.  But tearing down a struggling neighborhood rarely made problems like crime and overcrowding go away. To the contrary, displaced people would move to other neighborhoods, often exacerbating overcrowding problems. Crime rates rose, not fell, in the years after these projects.  By cutting urban neighborhoods in half, planners undermined the blocks on either side of the freeway. The freeways made nearby neighborhoods less walkable. Reduced foot traffic made them less attractive places for stores and restaurants. And that, in turn, made them even less walkable. Those with the means to do so moved to the suburbs, accelerating the neighborhoods' decline.


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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 4:00 AM

It is really interesting to see how urbanization has affected not just us today but our parents and grandparents. Of course with innovation includes consequence whether good or bad it happens. Go America!

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:34 AM

Urbanization - transportation

 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 10:16 AM

Industrialization changed not only the physical face of cities, but also the social. Innovations such as highways have caused transportation to become widely easier, allowing people from all different regions of the city to travel easily back and forth from place to place. 

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Kahoot! as a Review Tool

Kahoot! as a Review Tool | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Kahoot! is a classroom response system which creates an engaging learning space, through a game-based digital pedagogy. Kahoot! is an easy-to-use blended learning platform which works on any device, making the classroom interactive, encouraging both educators and learners to ask great questions.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 11, 3:36 PM

Here are resources to join the 166,000 students preparing to take the AP Human Geography Exam this Friday:

  • Above is the link to a Kahoot! APHG review...a good way to gamify the review process.  
  • There is also this APHG Kahoot! interactive quiz--in this one the students match a development clue to a regional map.
  • This Prezi is a systemic, unit-by-unit review of major ideas. 


Tags: APHG.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 9:47 AM

test review

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AP Human Geography Models and Theories

AP Human Geography Models and Theories | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Prezi covering all AP Human Geography Models and Theories by Liam Page.....Simple Version- http://tinyurl.com/q637dl8

Michael Miller's insight:

Basic Review of most models/theories....

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iScore5

iScore5 | HMHS History | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 9:08 AM

iScore5, the app for AP Human Geography is now available in the Apple Store for $4.99 and has received some excellent reviews. With five levels of questions at increasing difficulty, bonus and double bonus rounds and a study mode with extensive vocabulary, APHG students and teachers alike will find this a great test prep resource and a fun and engaging way to help students earn that 5 (open disclosure--I was a part of the team that developed content for the app, but am NOT receiving any money for promoting it.  I'm sharing it because I'm excited about this new resource).  


Tags: APHG, teacher training, edtech.

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, May 4, 10:48 AM

just another reminder....

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Ep. 3 of 5 - How the Division of Knowledge Saved My Son's Life - YouTube

Marginal Revolution University is a new approach to online education led by Professors Tyler Cowen and Alex Tabarrok of George Mason University and the popul...
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Palm Oil Plantations Are Blamed For Many Evils. But Change Is Coming

Palm Oil Plantations Are Blamed For Many Evils. But Change Is Coming | HMHS History | Scoop.it
In Indonesia, efforts are underway to grow palms in a sustainable way. But that's putting a squeeze on small farmers.

 

Palm oil is in everything, from pizza dough and chocolate to laundry detergent and lipstick. Nongovernmental organizations blame it for contributing to assorted evils, from global warming to human rights abuses. But in the past year, this complex global industry has changed, as consumers put pressure on producers to show that they're not destroying forests, killing rare animals, grabbing land or exploiting workers.

 

Tags: Indonesia, conservation, environment, consumption, SouthEastAsia, podcast.


Via Seth Dixon
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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 3, 9:00 AM

Will they also stop using Glyphosate to kill the old trees in order to plant new ones? Or use Glyphosate to keep the grass from growing in their fields? Sometimes the changes are more on the marketing side, than the actual day-to-day practices.

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The Modern Revolution: Crash Course Big History #8 - YouTube

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Sunnis and Shiites

Sunnis and Shiites | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Clarissa Ward breaks down the history of differences between opposing sects of Islam

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 8:58 PM

The geography of the Sunni-Shiite division is incredibly important for a good understanding of world regional geography as well as modern geopolitics. This 5 minute video (as well as this NPR podcast) examine the historical and religious aspects of this split to then analyze the political and cultural implications in the Middle East today.  Additionally this Pew Research article highlights the 5 countries where the the majority of Muslims are Shiite, with some good demographic data to add to the analysis.  Take this quiz to test your knowledge.  


Tags: MiddleEast, Islamreligionhistorical, culture.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, April 14, 10:51 AM

Since Obama turmoil with his absurd Arab Spring, Sunni Shite are killing one the other like crazy Islamist

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:07 PM

There is a very complicated history between two major religions in the Middle East. History shows how this religion was divided by Mohamed’s death. It turned into a totally new religion and now rivals in the Middle East. I have to mention that one of my co-workers is from Syria and his definition about Sunnis and Shiites are not open minded. The history behind the Muslims religions demonstrate that the more power they have the more places they will dominate. Furthermore, human rights are violated regardless of religious denomination. For some people, Sunnis are considered as terrorist and compared to extremist groups such as Al Qaeda and ISIS. These people who do not want to implement any kind of technology in their countries are holding on to the past with their religion. However, the Shiites experience more freedom even though they still follow strict religious rules. Even the US is confused about these Middle Eastern religions as countries that used to be governed by Sunnis now are run by Shiites. The US needs to remain neutral regarding these religious changes.

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Containerization Shaped Globalization

"Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove..."


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 7, 2014 5:26 PM

I always enjoyed TED videos. What really struck me was the opening sentence of the video, "everything is everywhere these days." This is so true in so many ways. The video uses different examples that you can find in different stores from places all over the world. How many things can you could in your bedroom that says "Made in China" or some other place other than the US? This is very common as we all know. Products and goods come from all over the world and even over seas. This is a process that we call globalization. However, the video introduces a process called containerization. This process saves an ample amount of time for the workers. The process was a success. "shrinking the world and enlarging human choice."

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 7:48 PM

Globalization has connected the world in such a way that we hadn't thought possible. This idea has created rising economies all over the world and has made transport of goods and services move faster and continues to increase this rate with advances in technology. Containerization is a staple of globalization and without it, none of these products would be able to get from country to country. In essence it has developed the world of import and exports. To add to this success, globalization has also created jobs and communities which revolve heavily around the transport of goods. It saves time by using massive containers to move goods and it creates opportunities in places where it had not been possible before. 

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 27, 3:45 AM

I believe this video is very interesting. It tells us that everything we have today is thanks to globalization and the reason we have it so fast is because of shipping containers! In the video it told me that before my time it was impossible to get swordfish from Japan or cheeses from France, but now thanks to globalization it is all possible. Globalization is even behind the reason how our phones were made! 

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The Human Imprint

The Human Imprint | HMHS History | Scoop.it
A Human Geography Resource; Especially for Teachers

 

The Human Imprint is home to everything Human Geography related for the student, educator, and the every day Joe/Jane. This site includes geographic related stories, lesson plans, and other links that bring us closer to understanding the “why of where.”


Via Seth Dixon
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SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 7:58 AM

Words leading to new Geography treads.

good for up to date articles.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 6:54 PM

Unit 1

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:15 PM

course resource

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One World Trade Center Elevator Ride Show Animated New York Skyline From 1500s To Now - YouTube

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Interactive Game of Thrones Map with Spoilers Control

Interactive Game of Thrones Map with Spoilers Control | HMHS History | Scoop.it
A map of Westeros and the rest of the known world in Game of Thrones and the Song of Ice & Fire novels. Mark how much of the TV show or novels you've seen to prevent seeing any spoilers. See the path of major characters over time.
Michael Miller's insight:

can you say obsessed?

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