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Google Maps for Nintendo

Trial Version: http://goo.gl/i4onu Google Maps is now available for 8-bit Nintendo Entertainment Systems (NES). Availability in Google Store is TBD but you c...

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This is hysterical!  How fast things have changed!

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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
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Why cities should dismantle highways

Why cities should dismantle highways | HMHS History | Scoop.it
At TEDxPhilly, Next American City editor at large Diana Lind explains why cities should rethink their highway infrastructure.

 

For generations, the prominent model of urbanism accepted in the U.S. has placed the automobile as the top priority for public places, placing massive highways right in the middle of key downtown areas.  Some cities (including Denver, DC, NYC, Providence and Dallas) are rethinking the relationship between urban spaces and the transportation networks.  


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Megacities Interactives

Megacities Interactives | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, will be home to 29 megacities. We explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of these 'cities on steroids', and take a look at the challenges and opportunities megacities present for the tens of millions living in Lagos, Mexico City and Dhaka."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 27, 2014 8:53 AM

Through this BBC interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents.   Also, this Smithsonian Magazine interactive (also on the rise of Megacities), argues that dealing with megacities is one of the traits of the Anthropocene. 


Download the BBC data as a CSV file to be able to import this into a customizable ArcGIS online map.  This will help you to create an analytical storymap (but I still enjoy a good narrative storymap).  


Tags: urban, megacitiesESRI, anthropocene, CSV.

Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's curator insight, October 27, 2014 3:40 PM

and wuhan inside

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 11:48 AM

This article asks and answered the question of how and when we will reach a time and place where we live will be limited (as we weigh down the world)? -UNIT 1

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Water and Development

Water and Development | HMHS History | Scoop.it

When access to clean drinking water is an issue, it creates a web of developmental problems for a community.  For a video with more information about water/development statistics, but the organization http://charitywater.org see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCHhwxvQqxg&feature=player_embedded


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David 's comment, May 21, 2012 11:58 PM
thank you for your awesome information
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What Will Be Left Then?

What Will Be Left Then? | HMHS History | Scoop.it

A fun thought exercise touching on the themes of energy, resources, consumption and sustainability.  We all know that we are consuming resources quickly; if we (globally) continue at the same rate of consumption, how long with certain resources last?  If a is child born now, what resources would be gone when s/he is a middle aged?  A senior citizen? See the animated version here: http://www.amanda-warner.com/samples/whatleft/  


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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | HMHS History | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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Fresh Water Resources

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/where-we-get-our-fresh-water-christiana-z-peppard Fresh water accounts for only 2.5% of Earth's...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 12, 2013 2:45 PM

How much of the Earth's water is fresh water?  How much of that is used for industrial, agricultural or domestic uses?  Why is groundwater becoming increasingly utilized?  Enjoy this TED-ED video for the answers. 


Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend.

Agron S. Dida's comment, December 17, 2013 5:33 AM
Ben, there is a good link about the lack of water: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131216154330.htm#.UrAC_n3F2FA.twitter
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Hydraulic Fracking

Hydraulic Fracking | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking', is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside."

 


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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:37 PM

Hydrographic Turing puts people in  safety and health risks. Because the water is contaminated and because of the oil spills, blow outs, and fires. They put chemicals into the ground in order to make cracks in the earth to collect natural oil, but they use people's land in order to collect the oil. People are complaining about these industries because they now have to buy water every month instead of getting it from their sinks or wells. Not to mention some houses have already blew up or caught on favor thanks to hydro fracturing. They need to put a stop to this, at least do it on land that is not being used and far away from people.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:07 PM

The development of gas is important for energy but there are health and safety risks with cracking in neighborhoods. Quality of air and water is important for survival. Nature matters and people matter, they need to find a middle ground. 

Kuzi's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:42 AM

The visual example explained the procses

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15 Countries In 4 Minutes (Time Lapse)

"During the past two years, Kien Lam went on the kind of trip most could only dream about. The photographer wanted to "see as much of the world as possible," so he visited 15 countries around the globe, from Mexico to New Zealand, snapping more than 10,000 photographs along the way. He edited his work together to make this stupendous time-lapse, which may be one of the most envy-inducing travel diaries I've ever seen."

 

Tags: landscape, time lapse, video.


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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Food. It’s something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Geographic because it connects all of us to our environment. The recent global population projections for the year 2100 just went up from 9 billion to 11 billion, making the issues of food production and distribution all the more important.  For the last 3 years I’ve stored podcasts, articles, videos, and other resources on my personal site on a wide range of geographic issues, including food resources.  I thought that sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources on the geography of food would be helpful to understand our changing global food systems."


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, March 3, 7:38 AM

This is geography that everyone should know. POWERFUL!

AckerbauHalle's curator insight, March 3, 10:03 AM

Seth Dixon, ein Geografie-Dozent aus den USA, der sehr in den sozialen Medien aktiv ist, hat einmal seinen "interessantesten Seiten" über Landwirtschaft zusammengestellt. 

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, March 3, 6:30 PM

A great collection of a range of resources to teach the geography of food in all its dimensions.

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The Modern Revolution: Crash Course Big History #8 - YouTube

In which John Green returns to teaching World History!
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Recycling Steel

Steel is strong, versatile and 100% recyclable. Learn how old steel shipping containers are given a new lease on life as liveable spaces.

 

Reusing resources is a critical part of sustainability.  This video looks at the recycling of steel including the creating of container homes.


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Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Some four decades after welcoming foreign assembly plants and factories, known as maquiladoras, Mexico has seen only a trickle of its industrial and factory workers join the ranks of those who even slightly resemble a middle class." 

 

Despite making such consumer goods like BlackBerry smartphones, plasma TVs, appliances and cars that most people in the US, for instance, consider necessities, Mexican workers in these factories seldom get to enjoy these items because, as this article argues, the labor system keeps them in poverty.  Foreign investment in these businesses keep unions out and attracts workers from poorer areas, allowing low-cost labor to prevail.  Less than $8 a day is the going wage - great for the bottom line and consumer prices but very bleak for those who toil in this system.


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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:26 PM

This article talks about how the maquiladora labor system dosen't provide enough money for it's workers. Many in Mexico are living in poverty and can't afford much more than dinner because of their low wages.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:47 PM

The labor system keeps workers in Poverty. This is the argument that is transitioned by stating the fact that many factory workers are and will always remian in poverty if they have no oppurtunity to move up in the food chain and become educated in order to get themselves out of poverty. They need different skills in order to aquire a better job to create a better life.  

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 11, 11:33 PM

Its a very sad situation reading this. Seeing people go through all this to just survive. Kids don't even get any education and follow their parents footsteps to work at a plant just to be able to pay for bills. 8 dollars a day, and you wonder why they try to run to united states. Its very unfortunate that a lot of people go through this and i hope it changes soon, because to see that this is going on makes me thankful for what i have around me. Foreign investors are not great as they set out to be take advantage of the poor and get rich out of it, i think its pretty ridiculous.

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Transportation Networks Impacting Urban Patterns

Transportation Networks Impacting Urban Patterns | HMHS History | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 11, 2013 1:00 PM

Essay #3 for the AP Human Geography 2013 exam focused on how railroads and highways impacted the size and form of U.S. cities.  Andy Baker, one of the great readers on that question has put together an interactive map filled with tangible examples of how Indianapolis' land use history has been heavily influenced by the railroads and highways.  This would be a great resource to prepare students to answer that FRQ. 


Tags: transportationurban, models, APHG.

Ally Greer's comment, June 11, 2013 1:58 PM
This brings back memories from when I took this in high school!
Andy Baker's comment, June 17, 2013 4:03 PM
Thanks for "scooping" this. When I click the link, it takes me to the Google home page. Here's the link: https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid=215141888958669508744.0004bb9c881395bd56662&msa=0&ll=39.772659,-85.940552&spn=1.06603,2.364807
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Central Place Theory

Central Places:Theory and Applications produced by Ken Keller (kellek@danbury.k12.ct.us) adapted from Don Ziegler.


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chris tobin's comment, March 12, 2013 6:27 PM
This is interesting. Threshold and ranges are excellent tools to market goods and services especially within the hexagon model but also with statistical informaton on socioeconomic status and dispersement within a population for marketing purposes. Thanks- great information.
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 5:15 PM

Another way to think about Central Place.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 20, 2014 11:09 PM

Good Review HUGGERS

 

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Augmented Reality Sandbox

"Realtime topographic contour line generation."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 3, 1:34 PM

Many of our first experiments of creating landforms and designing a new world started in the sandbox (you can only image what I do at the beach).  This video shows how that early childhood activity can make for an excellent classroom demonstration to shows how Earth's physical systems work.  If you don't happen to have a digital topographic map to superimpose on the sandbox and a GPU-based water simulation, then at least you've got this video.  Click here to learn more about this UC Davis project on the visualization of lake ecosystems.


Tags: water, physical, geomorphology, landforms, visualization.

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If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere

If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere | HMHS History | Scoop.it
If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere, from the USGS Water Science School...

 

"This picture shows the size of a sphere that would contain all of Earth's water in comparison to the size of the Earth. The blue sphere sitting on the United States, reaching from about Salt Lake City, Utah to Topeka, Kansas, has a diameter of about 860 miles (about 1,385 kilometers) , with a volume of about 332,500,000 cubic miles (1,386,000,000 cubic kilometers). The sphere includes all the water in the oceans, seas, ice caps, lakes and rivers as well as groundwater, atmospheric water, and even the water in you, your dog, and your tomato plant."

 

The sphere does not include the potential water that some scientists believe may be trapped in the mantle (and thus not accessible on the surface).  For more about water that is not on or near the surface, see: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/03/0307_0307_waterworld.html


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Gary Robertson's comment, May 7, 2012 9:36 PM
Water is also tied up in hydrated minerals in the rocks of the earth's crust. While not "free" it is still significant and is occasionally freed through subduction and volcanic activity. Furthermore, the earth's mantle may contain even more water than the rest combined! So, maybe the Single Sphere should be larger by more than the cube root of 2, or about 1,083 miles in diameter. See mantle water data at http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/03/0307_0307_waterworld.html
Seth Dixon's comment, May 7, 2012 11:08 PM
Thanks Green Uncle Mary! I mean Mean Uncle Gary!
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The Economics of Sustainability

http://www.ted.com Have we used up all our resources? Have we filled up all the livable space on Earth? Paul Gilding suggests we have, and the possibility of...

 

This provocatively title TED talk would be an excellent resource for discussing sustainable development.  What are the economic, environmental, political and cultural ramifications of suggested policies that seek to lead towards sustainable development?  What are the ramifications of not changing policies towards sustainable development?  


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:02 AM

 I found this video very interesting because it spoke about how there is so little space and more and more people are having kids. But there is no space because everyone likes having a lot of room to expand that is why because everyone in the world could fit in the state of California. So there is space it is just not spread out good enough that everyone could fit comfortably. 

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Energy Conservation

Energy Conservation | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Energy conservation starts at home....

 

This interesting National Geographic article emphasizes how consumption patterns in the home are connected to some of the serious global issues that we currently face.  This article becomes an exploration into how to go about creating a more environmentally sustainable home. 


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Teresa Gallego Navarro's curator insight, December 18, 2012 9:50 PM

The best energy is the one we don´t consumpt!!

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Global Oil Reserves

Global Oil Reserves | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Who has the oil? http://pic.twitter.com/7Njc7OD8rw


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Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, March 13, 2014 11:22 PM

Inequalities exist as well

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 26, 2014 6:03 PM

This graph depcits Sauda Arabia with the most oil reserves in at 262 Billion barrels and in second place coming in at 132 billion barrels is Iran. These barrels are a very important assett to not only the US but to the world. This is why gas is so expensive because most of the time the US has to import it from differnt countries in order to obtain the amount we need for resources and mostly everything is based on oil as far as some fossil fuels are concerned. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2014 5:22 PM

India is demonstrated at 2,000-2,999 in range of bbps. This amount of oil reserves is very important to the revenue of the country and the way that the poeple survive, natural resources such as oil are a very important and costly resource to obtain. Having oil in your country helps with trade and revenue income and trade routes are compiled which helps the economy.

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Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World

Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Eating at the school cafeteria could've been amazing if you grew up almost anywhere but the U.S.

 

Tags: agriculture, food distribution. 


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Phil LAUGRAND's curator insight, February 27, 6:00 AM

education  may also start in sharing culinaries cultures...

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 28, 6:49 PM

Location, climate, culture, and economic problems affect how people do things in certain environments around the world. The article mentions that schools “should be eating what grows around you,” but we cannot always rely on local agriculture since some products could actually cause more health problems for the public. Educational institutions, especially for children, should be the most concerned with this issue. Schools systems should be trained and ensure that their lunchroom meals adhere to nutritional standards and offer healthy choices for their students. Another problem is that some region’s agriculture may be affected by the climate and low farm budgets which forces schools to have to settle for non-natural and unhealthy food options in order to reduce costs

Amanda Pereira Triani's curator insight, March 3, 8:53 AM

Food can show us about culture and health life. This article talk how kids eat in their schools around the world and compare it with the USA style food.

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How the warming Arctic might be behind Boston's deep freeze

How the warming Arctic might be behind Boston's deep freeze | HMHS History | Scoop.it
There may be a counterintuitive explanation for the deep freeze that hit New England this winter: The rapidly warming Arctic is causing big disruptions in the jet stream, which carries weather across North America. Is this the worst winter you've experienced?

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Boston, climate change, podcast.


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Gail McAuliffe's curator insight, March 1, 11:12 AM

Perhaps this article will sway some climate change skeptics...

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Russia, the Kievan Rus, and the Mongols: Crash Course World History #20 - YouTube

John Green teaches you the history of the world in 42 episodes!
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Story of Stuff - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world
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Definitely slanted - but has some interesting stats...

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Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke...

 

Where is Coca Cola produced?  Some products are bulk losing some are bulk gaining in the manufacturing process.  Coca Cola and their containers represent bulk gaining products.  Although not the focus of this video, what is the geography behind where these factories are located?  How would this geographic pattern change if this were are bulk losing industry?  What are examples of bulk gaining and bulk losing industries?  Why are glass bottles not manufactured in the United States? 


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Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:32 PM
As consumers, we never pay THAT much attention to how theproduct is manufactured, but only what's in it. Seeing this vide makes me wonder how many other well-known products are manufactured??
megan b clement's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:40 AM

"The video displays the maufacturing and distribution of the Coca Cola product globally. Goal is to put Coke in all hands and they need ultimate factories for distribution. For non-alcoholic beverage market Coke is number 1. They produce 800 servings a day and Coke does about 670 billion dollars in sales a year. There recipe is the best kept secret, they use words like natural flavors that help keep the recipe a secret. Logistics, cheap labor, and cheap transportation are key to maximize every dollar. "

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:57 PM

I can't believe how much money this company makes in a single year. The people in this country must have some serious kidney stones lol. But on a serious note, this company definately has a good strategy on how to minimize cost transportation, because to transport 4.5 million servings that Coca Col makes in a single day, let alone, a year, must be quite expensive and time consuming. Not to mention that they distribute their products in 206 countries, they legit serve 99% of mankind. No wonder they make $670 Billion. 

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Outside the Amtrak Window, a Picture of the U.S. Economy

Outside the Amtrak Window, a Picture of the U.S. Economy | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The death and life of the industrial corridor linking New York and Washington.

 

This article is a great example of analyzing the landscape to observe changes in any given place.  This corridor is home to 8 of the 10 wealthiest counties; at the same time this transportation corridor is also home a half a dozen of the country's most broken cities.  Exploring this area is way to analyze the changing economic geographies of the United States.  For a visual representation of these same themes, see this 5 minute video that corresponds to this NY Times magazine article. 

 

Tags: industry, economy, unit 6 industy, transportation, neighborhood, landscape.


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Don Brown Jr's comment, November 20, 2012 12:06 PM
I can’t help but think of Rhode Island, specifically communities in Providence and how the decline of the textile industry and rise of the automobile has affected the contrast in standards of living and opportunities between the residents of the East Side and South Providence.