HMHS History
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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Which NFL Team Are You Stuck Watching Every Sunday?

Which NFL Team Are You Stuck Watching Every Sunday? | HMHS History |
Like millions of other Americans, I watch the NFL on a regular basis. However, just like millions of other viewers, most Sundays I am not sure which games will be on my television. For years, the strange geographic structures that underpinned league broadcasts were almost entirely obscured from the average consumer. People would turn on their TVs expecting to see one game only to be disappointed by another.

Via Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2015 1:25 PM

The top map is essentially a major market analysis of sports teams and shows to some extent the media hinterlands of America's major cities.  The second map I find even more interesting; all teams are regional, but a select few have larger national followings (if you are a fan of the Packers, Steelers, 49ers or Cowboys and are not from those areas, maybe I can guess your age).  There are many other maps in this interesting sports geography article.  What patterns do you see?  Explanations? 

Tag: sportspatialmapping, regions.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 20, 2015 11:31 AM

unit 1 and 6

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

What is Geography?

Via Seth Dixon
Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:38 PM

This presentation talks about the misconceptions of geography and about what it really involves. Geographers describe and try to explain how locations interact and relate to one another; are arranged the way they are; and have become what they are now. They also use critical thinking to project what the world might look like in the future. As there's usually so many questions that have to be answered, geography is an interdisciplinary work, meaning that it is a blend of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Geographers also develop other skills, such as mapping and graphing (spatial representation skills) and development of verbal concepts, frameworks and mathematical models (spatial theorizing skills). Geography, therefore, can be used to study many issues, such as climate change, sustainability, human rights, among others.

Reflection- as the presentation accurately shows, many people believe that geography is just about memorizing countries and our world's natural resources locations, but in reality, geography goes much deeper than that. Geography is about asking questions and trying to come out with the best answers in order to solve issues that can range from local usage of land to international security.

Gregory Stewart's curator insight, August 29, 2015 9:37 AM

Prezi created by students interested in the field of geography.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:26 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This Prezi was created by students from theSyracuse Geography Department as part of a Senior Seminar to explain the disciple, the major and its utility.   This is a great recap of the discipline, the major and it's utility.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations | HMHS History |
Dr Sarah Parcak uses satellite technology to unearth Egypt's ancient settlements, pyramids and palaces lost in the sands of time.

Via Seth Dixon
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 4, 2014 12:10 AM

It is interesting to find out that in this specific article there is controversy over the looting of tombs over 5,000 years ago as soon as the deceased were buried there were many more looting acts taken place. The Arab spring is an important landmark to think of when relating this to the reading.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:51 AM

This describes human characteristics that defined this region because it shows how ancient artifacts are being unearthed through new-age technology.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:49 AM

Space archaeology only makes sense.  If we have the capability for satellites to take pictures of earth from above why shouldn't it be used for archaeological analysis?  I am sure that this is only the tip of the iceberg as far as what we will see in the future from this specific field. This article/video just lends more credibility to the fact that Archaeology should function as an interdisciplinary field.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Spatial Analysis of LBJ

Spatial Analysis of LBJ | HMHS History |
LeBron explains how he transformed himself into a ruthlessly efficient scoring machine.

Via Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 29, 2013 10:22 AM

This series of spatial diagrams (dare I say, maps?) shows how the offense game of LeBron James has changed dramatically over the last few years, greatly increasing his efficiency.  Do you know of a basketball-loving student that might appreciate spatial analysis more when seen through the lens of their favorite sport? 

Tag: sportspatial.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

2012 Election Cartograms

2012 Election Cartograms | HMHS History |

I'm sure most of you have seen the 2008 version of these fantastic maps and cartograms and they've been a go-to reference for me since the last election.  The typical red state/blue state map conceals much concerning the spatial voting patterns in the United States and fails to account for the population densities of these distributions.  That's what makes this county level voting maps and cartograms so valuable.  


Questions to Ponder: What new patterns can you see in the county map that you couldn't see in the state map?  What do the cartograms tell you about the United States population?  


Tags: cartography, mapping, rural, zbestofzbest.

Via Seth Dixon
Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 11:16 PM

I'm really glad at how the cartographer of this map was able to properly demonstrate the way the American population voted during the 2012 presidential  election. Unlike the map that we are accustomed to seeing on television during political elections. What I appreciate about this map is how it tries to represent the way in which Americans caste their votes. While you'd be led to believe that certain states voted a particular way, this map proves otherwise. Another thing that this map does is represent the states that are widely considered to be Republican, and Democratic. States that tend to be in favor of GDP are conservative states, such as that of the south with the exception of FL, and the rest of the country being fairly liberal. Nonetheless, this is definitely and interesting and telling map of our patterns as voters.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Kids Who Get Driven Everywhere Don't Know Where They're Going

Kids Who Get Driven Everywhere Don't Know Where They're Going | HMHS History |
A new study suggests vehicular travel affects children's ability to navigate their neighborhood and connect to their community.


We learn about the places around us by exploring.  Literally our mental map is formed by making choices (in part through trial and error) and that process strengthens our spatial perception of the neighborhood.  Research is showing that kids with a 'windshield perspective' from being driven everywhere are not able to draw as accurate maps as children for who walk and bike their neighborhood.  The built environment and the transportation infrastructure in place play a role in developing spatial thinking skills for young minds. 


This is a compelling article with some important implications.  What are the ramifications for geographers?  City planners? Educators?  Families moving to a new neighborhood?   

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:52 AM

We may not realize it but when we take our kids out on drives to run errands or if we move to a different area we are ruining their understanding of the area they live in. Children often have a hard time of figuring out where they are if they constantly in a car looking at new places. This can cause them to lack a sense of direction and maybe have trouble remembering streets or landmarks near their homes. 


Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It

Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It | HMHS History |

"The images here, taken from the Instagram account @the.jefferson.grid show just a few of the landscapes that can be squeezed into the one-mile squares. The idea behind this sprawling checkerboard emerged after the Revolutionary War. As the United States expanded westward, the country needed a systematic way to divide its newly acquired lands. The original colonies were surveyed using the British system of 'metes and bounds,' with parcels delineated using local geography.  


That approach doesn’t scale very well, and Jefferson proposed to slice the young United States into gridded plots of land.  Jefferson's idea became a reality in 1785 when it was enacted as the Public Land Survey System. Today his grid covers much of the country, and it is still used to survey federal lands — an idea that shaped the physical landscape of half a continent."


Tags: images, land use, landscape, social media, planning, spatial, scale, historical.

Via Seth Dixon, Jane Ellingson, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Dyna-e International's curator insight, September 1, 2015 12:32 PM

No such thing as being off the grid really. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:05 PM

unit 1 and 4

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball

Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball | HMHS History |

"Football’s analytics are evolving quickly. Thanks to new forms of data and emerging kinds of analyses, teams, media, and fans are gaining new insights into on-field performances."

Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:42 PM
This article explains how people come up with the statistics that they can for each player. Using spatial thinking anaylsts can figure out where a player is best on the field. Where players "sweet spots" are on the field or where a player is most effective when playing. It is crazy how people even thought of this.
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS

Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS | HMHS History |

"GIS has given us the chance to re-examine how the Civil War battle was won and lost." 

Via Seth Dixon
Todd Pollard's curator insight, February 4, 2014 10:34 PM

I really like this interactive map application.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 28, 2014 1:13 PM

unit 1

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 3:14 PM

Just another of the millions of uses for GIS...

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Central Place Theory

Central Places:Theory and Applications produced by Ken Keller ( adapted from Don Ziegler.

Via Seth Dixon
Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:04 PM

Central Place Theory - This PowerPoint is the best representation of Christaller's Central Place Theory that I've seen! It does a great job at showing its hexagonal layout, along with describing urban hierarchy and sizes, and range that a person will go to buy certain goods.

Cohen Adkins's curator insight, February 6, 3:43 PM

I believe the central place theory is very important for Business owners who want to set up a commercial building because it shows the amount of competition that the business owner would have if they desire to settle somewhere. - C.Adkins

Chelsie Rogers's curator insight, March 7, 4:29 PM

The Central Place Theory is a model that is not used much today in academic geography, but given it's explicitly spatial nature, it is used in many geography curricula (including AP Human Geography) to show systems thinking and spatial patterns.  This powerpoint goes over the main ideas of the theory developed by Walter Christaller as well as some examples.  


Tags: APHG, models, spatial. 

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World

Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World | HMHS History |
Adapted from the book by Professor Susan Hanson...


Via Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 29, 2013 9:40 AM

This is an excellent review/summary of an edited volume that shows the value of geographic thought and its importance in the modern world.  This review conveniently gives a one paragraph synopsis of each chapter.  It does not need to be read chronologically, so you can pick and choose what you find relevant to your course.  The top 10 are (in order of inclusion in the book): the Idea of the Map, the Weather Map, GIS, Human Adjustment, Water Budget Climatology, Human Transformation of the Earth, Spatial Organization and Interdependence, Central Place Theory, Megalopolis and Sense of Place.

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 5:24 PM

Summary: This article demonstrated how geographic concepts have been able to change daily life for humans everywhere. It talked about the log term effect of many life changing geographic concepts, such as how maps have influenced weather forecasts which have become an important part of daily life.


Insight:  This article showed me how important geographic processes can be on daily life.  It also demonstrates that nearly everyone in a developed country today relies on their ability to read geographic information even in something as simple as a weather map.