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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
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The Most Complex International Borders in the World

"In this video I look at some of the most complex international border. Of course, there are more complex borders in the world, but this video looks at some of my favourites."


Via Seth Dixon
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ELAdvocacy's curator insight, October 3, 9:40 AM

There are so many reasons our immigrant students come to the United States.  Some stories are so complex and painful it can be extremely difficult for Americans to understand.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 3, 10:21 PM

Interesting!

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 5:39 AM

The Most Complex International Borders in the World

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 5:08 PM

South Sudan recently gained its independence from Sudan. South Sudan is now home to 10-12 million people and is the 193rd member of the United Nations. However, just because South Sudan became independent from Sudan does not mean it does not no longer carry some of the remaining issues.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 1:26 PM

This infographic gives an idea of why South Sudan seceded from the rest of the country. Decades of civil war preceded the secession, and it is clear the cultural differences between the two areas were a contributing factor. South Sudan is a part of the fertile Sahel, with the majority of its people Christian, while Sudan is mostly desert, with the majority of its people Muslims. South Sudan, as a new nation, faces a number of difficulties. Its new government needed to remain stable to focus on nation building, but war has broken out between the government and a rebel faction. South Sudan, should it become stable again, should work to improve the education of its people, as the infographic explains, since the vote to secede needed symbols rather than words due to only 15% of its people being literate.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:05 PM

South Sudan has separated itself two years ago from the rest of Sudan. Its powers have become acknowledged by other countries and its messages to the outside world are ones of peace.