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"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
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The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl]

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl] | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The need for speed devours huge chunks of American cities and leaves the edges of the expressways worthless. Busy streets, for almost all of human history, created the greatest real estate value because they delivered customers and clients to the businesses operating there. This in turn cultivated the highest tax revenues in town, both from higher property taxes and from elevated sales taxes. But you can't set up shop on the side of an expressway. How can cities afford to spend so much to create thoroughfares with no adjoining property value?

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Alex Lewis's curator insight, March 10, 10:23 AM

This article shows the difference between extremely urbanized areas and relatively urbanized areas. Florence and Atlanta are compared. Florence has narrow streets with sharp intersections, which causes cars to drive slowly. This is safer for pedestrians. In Atlanta, the roads are wider and curves are less sharp. The most this will do is help people in Atlanta get tp their jobs slightly faster. Miami and a seaside town are also compared. The interstate in Miami takes up most of the room and there is few real estate options. In the seaside town, options are not limited, around 80% available for use. The less urbanized places are more efficient. 

 

-A.L.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 10:48 AM

This blog really made me realize what an impact humans are to the environment. They compare different cities and talk about the impacts and it really showed me how humans have built up cities.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 21, 6:12 PM

A side by side comparison at first blush is striking but the devil is in the details. Florence, Italy is a city of only 368,000 while the Atlanta metro area is about 4.5 million. Agree that sprawl is ineffective real estate and efficiency wise, but fuel prices may be having a counter effect on the reduction of sprawl. It is much less expensive to commute given the price of oil at its current levels and the millennials will have a say in this urban sprawl contracting or expanding. Many do not own cars, relying on commuter systems within the city to get around. This in theory should drive down demand for fossil fuels, culminating in reduced prices for gasoline. If the infrastructure is already built, was is the cost to maintain it, given the static population of the large metro areas? Interesting to see how this plays out.

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Map Fight

Map Fight | HMHS History | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 11, 2014 3:02 PM

This simple WebApp allows the user to compare areas that are hard to compare on a map or globe because of distance or the map projection.  Competitive students love to hypothesize and then verify.  This helps strengthen student's mental maps and their ability to make regional comparisons. 


Tagsmapping K12, perspective, scale.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:40 PM

unit 1

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Earth's Cosmic Context

"Superclusters – regions of space that are densely packed with galaxies – are the biggest structures in the Universe. But scientists have struggled to define exactly where one supercluster ends and another begins. Now, a team based in Hawaii has come up with a new technique that maps the Universe according to the flow of galaxies across space. Redrawing the boundaries of the cosmic map, they redefine our home supercluster and name it Laniakea, which means ‘immeasurable heaven’ in Hawaiian.  Read the research paper here."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2014 2:30 PM

Spatial thinking and geographic exploration is constantly seeking to understand place in context to other places.  More often than not, that is done without every venturing beyond this planet, but in many respects, space is the greatest of contexts on the grandest of scales for us to understand ourselves.  I first saw this video embedded in an NPR article and it filled me with wonder to think about the immensities of space and that the Earth is such a small little corner of the universe. 


Tags: space, scale, perspective

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A Photo Essay on School Sprawl

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Schools used to be the heart of a neighborhood or community. Children and not a few teachers could walk to class, or to the playground or ball field on the weekend. This was relatively easy to do, because the schools were placed within, not separated from, their neighborhoods. They were human-scaled and their architecture was not just utilitarian, but signaled their importance in the community. Now it has become hard to tell one from a Walmart or Target."

 

What better way to demonstrate the concepts of urban sprawl, automobile-dependent city planning and economies of scale than by analyzing the very geographic context of our schools themselves?  This is a very nicely arranged photo essay that most could spark conversation and would foster some discussion on how best to plan neighborhoods and spatially arrange the city.   

 

Tags: transportation, planning, sprawl, education, scale. 


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The surprising math of cities and corporations

"Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities — that wealth, crime rate, walking speed and many other aspects of a city can be deduced from a single number: the city's population. In this mind-bending talk from TEDGlobal he shows how it works and how similar laws hold for organisms and corporations."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2014 2:44 PM

While corporations rise and fall, it is quite rare for a city to entirely fail as an economic system.  Huge cities have some negative consequences, but the networks that operate in the city function more efficiently on economies of scale in a way that offsets the negatives.  Increasing a city's population will continue to improve the economies of scale (larger cities have higher wages per capita, more creative employment per capita, etc.).  However, this growth requires major technological innovations to sustain long-term growth.  

 

Tagsurban, planningmegacities, industry, economic, scaleTED, video.

Built 4 Betterness Ed van den Berg's curator insight, December 14, 2014 3:17 PM

Not surprisingly the DNA of cities is a follow-up of human DNA and understanding this will explain and predict how the body of a city will develop!

SRA's curator insight, April 16, 2:10 AM

The idea that cities are just organisms that are satisfying the laws of biology is interesting. Especially because Physicist Geoffrey West brings the idea of Scalability which by definition is, the ability of a system, network, or process to handle a growing amount of work in a capable manner or its ability to be enlarged to accommodate that growth. What’s mind blowing to me is that the system that is referred to here is human interaction.  We create these cities through our interaction and experience. With a growth rate of 1,000,000 people every year the math adds up to an agreeable 15% rise in income levels, patents, and super creative people every year which is undoubted a win for civilization and society. But with that we must keep in mind also this means a 15% increase in things like deadly disease, crime, poverty, and ecological issues leading to further degradation of our planet. This unbounded growth means the system is destined to collapse. The math behind cities doesn't lie if we don’t prepare cities have a fate to die like every other organism in Biology. So it is up to us to create and innovate to sustain this growth and avoid the collapse. But we must do so at a forever increasing pace. Which subsequently is also part of another system predetermined to collapse. What I mean is what happens when we cannot innovate fast enough to sustain this growth?


- Caleb Beckett

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Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2014 3:32 PM

This is a good video to explain globalization (although this is my personal favorite), to see that it not just an economic force, but one that touches just about every facet of modern life.
 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:24 AM

Globalization in a Nutshell

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

Altaira Wallquist's curator insight, March 18, 4:47 PM

This article goes in depth to define and describe globalization.  It discusses globalization  through an economical, political, and cultural standpoint.

 

This connects to Unit 1 in that it discusses globalization and things from a global perspective. It all discusses the society we live in today.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, March 22, 10:18 PM

globalization

This video describes and really breaks down globalization. The video talks about how some countries benefit and some countries don't benefit from globalization. The video also separates globalization into three parts: economic, politics, and culture. It goes over the huge role that technology plays in globalization and covers it well.

This relates to our unit, because globalization is a huge factor in human geography as a whole. It is one of the main factors why our cultures are beginning to intertwine and have things in common.