HMHS History
Find tag "medical"
6.2K views | +0 today
HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Changes in Mortality: 1900 to 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 to 2010 | HMHS History |

"The New England Journal of Medicine looks at death reports in 200 years of back issues. The first thing to notice here is how much our mortality rate has dropped over the course of a century, largely due to big reductions in infectious diseases like tuberculosis and influenza."

Via Seth Dixon
Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 17, 9:37 AM
pascal simoens's curator insight, October 26, 7:34 PM
A méditer
AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2:12 PM

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer).  


Questions to Ponder: What geographic factors shape mortality rates and shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?


Tagsmortality, medical, development, historical, USA, population, statistics, unit 2 population, infographic, models.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | HMHS History |
How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.

Via Seth Dixon
Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2:21 PM

Before I even read the article, my first thought went to the Linneaus classification.  That really damaged history with this one chart.  I think people still think of Africans and blacks(very dark blacks) as dirty or unintelligent.  Which is horrible and couldn't be further from the truth.  Misinforming the public is criminal.  News media and social media need to be careful and educate properly.  I've been asked from a customs offical, "Have you been to Africa in the past 6 months?"  Which is a very blanket question because Africa is a continent.  There were areas that were not hit with Ebola.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 4:37 PM

Those who deny the continued influence of racism in our society are blinding themselves to the truth. Contemporary influences of the racism that plagued the preceding centuries are still found in most major media depictions of Africa. The Ebola epidemic has served to highlight the bigotry that plagues Western media, as the assumption that all of Africa is diseased and dirty is continuously perpetuated (when, in reality, Ebola only affected a very small part of the continent). Africa is presented as "other," a backwards continent that is in desperate need of Western help and guidance- in what was is that different from the European colonizers who also viewed their actions as benevolent attempts to "civilize" the uncivilized? That mindset has not left Western circles, and yet we continue to pat ourselves on the back and congratulate ourselves for suddenly being so tolerant. The insensitivity of Western audiences to the concerns of black individuals both at home and in Africa related to the prevalence of racism highlights how determined mainstream media is to deny the existence of a problem. Until we recognize the Eurocentrism that continues to plague our media and make the necessary moves to correct the practice, harmful depictions of Africa will continue to loom large in Western media and in the opinions of many Europeans and Americans alike.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 7:12 AM

Africa has long been treated by the western media as a dark , brutish, uncivilized place. Africa is a place were people starve and murder each other in large numbers. There is so much more to Africa than the picture I just described. The problem is, many people just do not accept the existence of a culturally complex Africa. That narrative would destroy the traditional  darker narrative of the past 500 years. A narrative grounded in the beliefs that blacks are inherently inferior beings. During the Ebola crises, the calls to cut off travel to Africa were quick and demanding. Had the crises been in England, would those same calls have been so loud? I think we all can guess the answer  to that question. Much progress has been made, but we still need to change our cultural depiction of Africa.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Ebola easier to stop now than later

Help must come within weeks, or Ebola will require unimaginable resources. Data sources: &

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 2014 12:36 PM

unit 1 diffusion!

Michael Mazo's curator insight, October 6, 2014 2:54 PM

Ebola has been a growing concern for some time now. With its origin in Africa to its spreading throughout the world, people have become increasingly worried about contracting Ebola. With the initial diagnosis of the first patient infected with Ebola in the US, the CDC has been working constantly to prevent further spread of this infectious disease. Not only has this raised medical concerns, but as soon as the Ebola outbreak has entered the United States Biotechnology stocks began to rise. With the help of devices and programs stemming from Biotechnology there is great hope for eradicating the disease once and for all. Even healthcare workers are hesitant upon working with infected individuals, so hopefully biotech will enter with a grand entrance by providing materials or machinery to help prevent these workers from getting Ebola.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 16, 2014 11:46 AM

Although Ebola is a disease that can be stopped now, different measures need to be taken now. With the vaccines that were administered to the Ebola aid workers that were working in the site of the outbreak, mass production of that vaccine should be created and made available to those who are believed to be infected with this parasite.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

The Deadliest Animal in the World

The Deadliest Animal in the World | HMHS History |
Bill Gates introduces Mosquito Week on his personal blog, the Gates Notes. Everything posted this week is dedicated to this deadly creature. Mosquitoes carry devastating diseases like malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, and encephalitis.

Via Seth Dixon
Jacques Lebègue's curator insight, May 2, 2014 3:13 AM

"C'est pas la p'tite bête qui manger la grosse". La manger, je ne sais pas, être le vecteur de son décès, c'est plus probable. Les moustiques et le paludisme tuent plus de personnes en 4min que les requins en un an!
On pourrait aussi drastiquement réduire le nombre de décès humains en désormais tous ces humains dotés d'une arme...

16s3d's curator insight, May 2, 2014 3:51 AM

"C'est pas la p'tite bête qui manger la grosse". La manger, je ne sais pas, être le vecteur de son décès, c'est plus probable. Les moustiques et le paludisme tuent plus de personnes en 4min que les requins en un an!
On pourrait aussi drastiquement réduire le nombre de décès humains en désormais tous ces humains dotés d'une arme...

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, May 5, 2014 11:08 AM

ما هو المخلوق الأشد فتكا في العالم؟

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

The states with the loosest vaccination laws

The states with the loosest vaccination laws | HMHS History |
The state that leads the country in child vaccination rates probably isn't the one you think.

Via Seth Dixon
16s3d's curator insight, February 3, 4:48 PM
Avis aux parents irresponsables qui refusent la vaccination!!! Seth Dixon's insight:

<< I had measles back in 1977, when I was too young to be vaccinated during an outbreak in the Southern California region.  My father-in-law still lives with the effects of Polio that he contracted when he was a toddler, right around the time of Jonas Salk's great discovery that lead to the Polio vaccine.  I care about this issue because the effects are personal--but for too many, they've never known the realities of a world before vaccines. We collectively have forgotten WHY life expectancy and have steadily gone up over the decades at the same time that infant mortality rates have dropped.  It's in large part because the nightmarish diseases of yesteryear have been eliminated, if we collectively are all immunized. Unfortunately, this is the discouraging truth (for now): anti-vaxxers are nearly impossible to convince. I hope this current measles outbreak is the tipping point for their to be enough public sentiment to lead to change. >>

Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 4, 11:38 AM

Is your state on here?

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, February 24, 7:41 PM

"Shots Before School. It's the Rule." This slogan is posted on our school website and many other places, but there are exemptions from the rule. 19 states will allow exemptions for philosophical or religious reasons. 48 states and Washington D.C. will allow only religious exemptions. Only 2 states will not allow any exemptions at all.

America is founded on principles of religious freedom and the ability to choose for yourself. It makes sense that the majority of states would allow some sort of exemption for religion. What is really interesting is that the only 2 states with a no exemption policy are Mississippi and West Virginia. The states that allow philosophical exemptions are usually clustered in groups and spread their beliefs and rules to one another. Example: The Bible Belt

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | HMHS History |
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

Via Seth Dixon
Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, January 12, 10:18 AM

The development between MDCs and LDCs are very different in a lot of ways. The Ebola epidemic is handled in two different ways because of the levels of development in countries. in MDCs there is more of a health indutry and can cure sicknesses much faster than those countries of less development. 





















































Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2:29 PM

It was sad that it took over 4 months for there to be declared an epidemic.  I think if this hit in the US or Europe then things would have been taken care of a lot faster.  Out of sight, out of mind till one trickled in then another.  Then we got scared.  But Africa needs to get it together and create a better continent with healthcare systems that work.  The doctors over there said it looked medieval.  I believe that and can't even fathom how horrible it was.  

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 11:11 AM

Talking about the failure of WHO to stop the Ebola outbreak and how the low developed countries were so quickly affected by the disease. 


Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

Why this Ebola outbreak became the worst we've ever seen

"The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than sum total of all the previous outbreaks since the virus was first identified in 1976. This video explains how it got so bad."  

Via Seth Dixon
Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:08 PM

It is very sad watching knowing how it took to so long to get Ebola out to the public and make it known of the very spreadable virus. It’s obvious how since the US can be at risk of getting the virus in our country they now want to make it very known and for people to be cautious of the idea that Ebola can eventually be in the US and spread. We should have been cautious of the virus many years ago, but the rate of the virus spreading, sky rocketed just this year. It’s obvious why it took so many years for the Ebola virus to be known, since it was just known for it to have been in a particular Sierra Leon and Liberia. Since it has spread from there to the border of Guinea and now potentially going to different parts of the world there is no question why there is a health scare in many countries.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 28, 2014 10:20 PM

In just a few months the Ebola virus has cumulated out of control. More people became affected and died in the last five months than all of the combined deaths that have occurred since Ebola was first discovered in 1976. Ebola began to spread from rural areas to a border region in West Africa when ill people traveled to the city to work or go to the market, making international spread likely. Mounting a campaign to increase awareness of the risks and to contain the virus was nearly impossible due to the low illiteracy rates. Consequently, health workers were taking ill people away from family and their homes to contaminate centers. This caused much fear and mistrust and was not successful. More people became infected and the snowball effect ensued. When people did show up at ill-equipped hospitals, there were not enough beds or free space and most were turned away. Some health workers walked off the job fearing being infected because of the poor conditions. No gloves, masks or gowns were provided and workers feared for their own health. The ill patients went back into the community and Ebola continued to spread. The response of the global community was not fast enough, and help did not arrive in time before the spread of Ebola became an epidemic. It is clear that in a world that is so closely connected, we must have a global heath system that works.  

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:32 PM

Ebola is getting worst every day. one of the things that has caused the spread of this virus is the fact that many working people cross the border to other regions to work or to go to market. Back in days, you used to see this Ebola issue in very rural areas, but now is getting worst. In these areas were the Ebola is getting worst, they do not count with a good health system. Sometimes there are day when they do not have gloves, gowns and mask, and because of that, there have been health care workers who have just walked away from their jobs because they do not want to put in risk their life. This  is a very sad situation, which I hope it get better.

Rescooped by Michael Miller from Geography Education!

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | HMHS History |
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

Via Seth Dixon
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.


Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 2014 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.