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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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Rescooped by Michael Miller from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 10:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

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Directions and Dialects


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 23, 2013 11:11 PM

Learning about North, South Carolina isn't easy; and don't get me started on Due West...throw in a different accent and you've got a failure to communicate (and for the record, she is dead on with her geographic descriptions).


Tags: language, the South.

Expert's comment, September 25, 2013 10:07 PM
hehe :)
Molly Diallo's curator insight, September 30, 2013 5:59 PM

Amusing : )

Rescooped by Michael Miller from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 4:29 PM

These 22 maps are a great representation of how linguistically different the United States truly is. Depending  where you are from I the US shows how you say something differently. For example, in the Northeast and South, people pronounce the word caramel in two words, "cara and mel" and in the west and west coast it is pronounced " car-mel". Even the word crayon is pronounced differently depending where you live. 

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 10, 3:21 PM

Is very funny how Americans speak English differently from each other living in the same country.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 12:41 PM

As someone from RI, whenever I travel I always hear something about either my accent or my pronunciation of certain words. These maps and their trends were interesting to observe. I was surprised to see that crawfish was so different across the map.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2:11 PM

unit 4

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How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines

How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Few know "boondocks" is a relic of U.S. military occupation in the Philippines.

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 10:06 PM

I imaged that the term 'the boondocks' was of Asian origin, but I was surprised to learn how this U.S. military lingo was able to become a mainstream term.  The Tagalog word bundok means mountain and given the guerrilla warfare tactics, U.S. soldiers thought of their enemies as hiding 'in the boondocks.' This term spread throughout the military to mean an isolated region, but today the term has morphed from its military-based meaning of mountainous jungles to one that can also describe a sparsely populated rural America.  This is a fascinating article from NPR's Code Switch team that focuses on issues of culture, identity and race. 


Tags: language, toponyms, historical, conflict, culturediffusion.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 13, 2013 3:06 AM

We have all heard the phrase living in the "Boonies" The boondocks was a word that was taken from a philipino word called Bundok, that meant the guerilla warfare they were experiencing from phillipino insurgents during the Spanish American War with the America. In this war which Teddy Roosevelt helped lead we gained US Puerto Rico and Guam as new Territories from the Treaty of Paris. The war was fought against Emilio Aguinaldo who was a master at guerilla tactics against American soldiers. This was a desperate war involving coloniazation or exerting our power as a country against other countries that ammassed a huge death toll. Now that we know the word boondok, is not an all American word that was popularized in the 1950's but it was actually taken from the Phillipino language during a time of fighting in the Jungle or the Sticks. But boondocks also refers to a people living around mouintainous regions. Just some food for thought.

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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | HMHS History | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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The Geography of Chechnya

The Geography of Chechnya | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The Caucasus region, dominated by the imposing Great Caucasus mountain range and stretching between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, has long been known as one of the world’s ethnically and linguistically most diverse areas.

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 17, 2013 3:01 PM

Using this article helps to teach ourselves, students, and others about particular places in the world that are unknown or very little known.  We can use articles such as this one to be less prejudiced and more apt to think about these places of the world in a different context rather than just a negative, terrorism-related one.

Marissa Roy's curator insight, November 19, 2013 10:16 AM

Most Americans had never heard Chechnya before the Boston bombing in April 2013. Now, most think that it is full of America-hating terriosts. However, Chechnya is so very complex and diverse a place, that it is ludacris to think that. Over 100 languages are spoken in the country. The southern half speaks languages such as Georgian, Svan and Mingrelian. Turkish, Iranian and Chechens are the languages you will probably hear in the North. Another misconception is that there are many Christians in Chechnya as well as Muslims. This country is made up of so many different groups, it is incredible. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 9:27 AM

It is amazing to consider such a small area (the size of New England) could hold such a vast area of languages.  The mountainous region certainly helps in creating such diversity as it isolated villages from each other in the ages before modern communication and travel.