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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 10:47 AM

APHG-U3

wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stran smith's curator insight, August 27, 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

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The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade

"With modern technology, a global exchange of goods and ideas can happen at the click of a button. But what about 2,000 years ago? Shannon Harris Castelo unfolds the history of the 5,000-mile Silk Road, a network of multiple routes that used the common language of commerce to connect the world's major settlements, thread by thread."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 4, 10:02 PM

This TED-ED lesson was produced in part by an AP Human Geography teacher and the strands of geographic thought in this video are evident.  More geographers should make their own TED ED lessons; thanks for blazing the trail Shannon! 


Tags: TED, worldwide, transportation, globalization, diffusion, historical, and video.

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 5:09 PM
Great video! Very cool to see how far the world has come in regards to globalization. Technology has allowed the people across the globe to immerse themselves in other cultures and good from other parts of the world.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 10:51 AM

Great video! Very cool to see how far the world has come in regards to globalization. Technology has allowed the people across the globe to immerse themselves in other cultures and good from other parts of the world.

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Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States

Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond has created an enhanced version of the Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, which was published in 1932. The atlas, which took dozens of researchers to assemble, used maps to illustrate a variety of political, demographic and economic concepts."


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Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, January 17, 9:37 AM

Muy buen material!

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, January 21, 11:24 AM

Atlas de la geografíia histórica de Estados Unidos.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 1:33 PM

Okay, this is actually pretty cool. The atlas is huge and has tons of information within it. No wonder there were tons of helping hands who created this map(s) of insightful looks at demographic and political debate.

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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | HMHS History | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


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Tom cockburn's comment, September 20, 2013 5:09 PM
Absolutely agree,Marian!
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 5:09 PM

These maps are a great way to see what North American cities used to look like in comparison to what they are now. Some great transformations are Chicago and NYC.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

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Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS

Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"GIS has given us the chance to re-examine how the Civil War battle was won and lost." 


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Todd Pollard's curator insight, February 4, 10:34 PM

I really like this interactive map application.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 28, 1:13 PM

unit 1

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 3:14 PM

Just another of the millions of uses for GIS...

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Kent State: Past and Present

Kent State: Past and Present | HMHS History | Scoop.it

On May 4, 1970, the Ohio National Guard gunned down Jeffrey Miller, Allison Krause, William Knox Schroeder, and Sandra Scheuer during an anti-war protest at Kent State University.


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Maegan Anderson's comment, May 7, 2013 12:37 AM
speechless...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, May 10, 2013 9:39 AM

Photos like this that juxtapose the original photograph to present day surroundings always grab me.  What an interesting discussion this could be in a history classroom!

Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:52 PM

Kent State: Past and Present | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2:11 PM

unit 4

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Africa Map Collection

Africa Map Collection | HMHS History | Scoop.it

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 1:38 PM

This collection of maps are interesting as they show how mysterious the African continent was to Europeans. With deep expeditions into the continent expensive, difficult, and dangerous, central Africa remained very much a mystery into the 20th century. The Mountains of the Moon and the Mountains of Kong, the supposed sources of the Niger and Nile river, were completely fabricated guesswork which remained on maps until the 20th century. For central Africa, rather than make guesses as to the terrain, cartographers frequently left the area blank or with scant details.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:06 PM

Maps come in all shapes and sizes. This one shows the divisions in Africa and how its been shaped and defined since colonization.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 11:58 PM

This is a fun collection of maps because you can see how the European view of Africa has changed over time. These maps contain nonexistent land marks such as the Mountains of Kong, these are here because cartographers made their maps based off incorrect information and then passed this information on to others who repeated their mistakes. African was known as the dark continent not only because of European racism but because of the lack of knowledge on behalf of the Europeans. 

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 11:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2:56 PM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, December 8, 2:13 PM

This is probably the best scoop it I've seen to date. I love the way it's created an insight into the past and present. To see history in a modern day past and present atmosphere is fascinating.

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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 6:58 PM

This article shows the shift of immigration over the past 100 years. From the predominantly European wave in 1910 to the more diverse wave in 2010 that consists of Mexican, Canada, India and many other countries.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, October 28, 12:10 AM

It's pretty clear that immigration has changed a lot in the US in the last 100 years. It was first full of Europeans, with a majority of Germans and now is almost full of Mexican, the largest wave of immigration in history from a single country to the United States. An interesting fact to know. We might think that Mexico was always the largest immigrants and is wasn't always like that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 6:24 PM

The reason this article and maps are so important is because it shows that immigration isn't a new aspect of the American way of life. Historically people from across the globe flocked to America from Europe and Asia and today we're seeing increasing immigration from Central and South Americans as well as those fleeing unstable areas in the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, June 2, 7:45 PM

Not really primary geography but so interesting!

Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

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How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines

How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Few know "boondocks" is a relic of U.S. military occupation in the Philippines.

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 10:06 PM

I imaged that the term 'the boondocks' was of Asian origin, but I was surprised to learn how this U.S. military lingo was able to become a mainstream term.  The Tagalog word bundok means mountain and given the guerrilla warfare tactics, U.S. soldiers thought of their enemies as hiding 'in the boondocks.' This term spread throughout the military to mean an isolated region, but today the term has morphed from its military-based meaning of mountainous jungles to one that can also describe a sparsely populated rural America.  This is a fascinating article from NPR's Code Switch team that focuses on issues of culture, identity and race. 


Tags: language, toponyms, historical, conflict, culturediffusion.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 13, 2013 3:06 AM

We have all heard the phrase living in the "Boonies" The boondocks was a word that was taken from a philipino word called Bundok, that meant the guerilla warfare they were experiencing from phillipino insurgents during the Spanish American War with the America. In this war which Teddy Roosevelt helped lead we gained US Puerto Rico and Guam as new Territories from the Treaty of Paris. The war was fought against Emilio Aguinaldo who was a master at guerilla tactics against American soldiers. This was a desperate war involving coloniazation or exerting our power as a country against other countries that ammassed a huge death toll. Now that we know the word boondok, is not an all American word that was popularized in the 1950's but it was actually taken from the Phillipino language during a time of fighting in the Jungle or the Sticks. But boondocks also refers to a people living around mouintainous regions. Just some food for thought.

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Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Dr Sarah Parcak uses satellite technology to unearth Egypt's ancient settlements, pyramids and palaces lost in the sands of time.

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elizama ramirez's curator insight, January 25, 12:15 AM

DR Sarah Parcak a archeologist is passionate about finding  ancient settlements under the sands. She uses a satellite technology as a resource to find these ancient settlements. It can be either pyramids, temples, or just statues.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 4, 12:10 AM

It is interesting to find out that in this specific article there is controversy over the looting of tombs over 5,000 years ago as soon as the deceased were buried there were many more looting acts taken place. The Arab spring is an important landmark to think of when relating this to the reading.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 11:51 AM

This describes human characteristics that defined this region because it shows how ancient artifacts are being unearthed through new-age technology.

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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | HMHS History | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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New York's Changing Skyline

New York's Changing Skyline | HMHS History | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 26, 2013 3:55 PM

I love this visualization of New York City's evolving skyline from 1876-2013.  The urban landscape of America's prominent cities has changed dramatically. 


Tags: historical,urbanarchitecture, landscape, NYC.

Louis Culotta's comment, May 1, 2013 11:32 AM
I wonder if the tallest building in the first picture is the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge??????
Louis Culotta's curator insight, May 1, 2013 11:35 AM

if you look at the first picture...it looks like the tall building on the water could be the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge...any suggestions to this?

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Holland vs the Netherlands

"What's the difference between Holland and the Netherlands?"


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Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, March 5, 2013 10:03 AM
This is awesome! Learn something new everyday!
Brett Sinica's comment, April 22, 2013 8:56 PM
I have seen this video previously, and this being my second time, it is much easier to understand this time around. He tells the story of one great kingdom and all areas that are under its control or influence. With the expansion of many European countries within the last couple centuries, I can understand how people can get culture and people mixed up, even though they’re from the same place to begin with. It reminds of the Arabs, or Arabic people. They don’t necessarily come from one country or one language or one religion. They represent a vast group of people and each of them differ or relate in certain ways. At times understanding these different groups can be a challenge, but in the end that is what makes them more unique and interesting.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 3:54 PM
Well this video was fairly interesting actually. Funnily enough, my Canadian friend made me watch the Great Britain video about a month ago and so when I saw this was made by the same person and I always seem to confuse Belgium/Netherlands/Holland it seemed like something I should think about doing. The video was very informational and the narrator went over many factual things including the simple question of: Where is everything? The video mainly focuses on physical geography of people but also goes on to explain that the ‘Dutch’ living in the Caribbean are actual ‘Europeans’ because they belong to the Kingdom of the Netherlands which belongs to the European Union which by the transitive property makes them Euros.

I liked what Brett said, that cultures and groups of people typically get categorized together as one when they really aren’t and it is important to acknowledge their distinctions and understand the different groups and cultures of people.
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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | HMHS History | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

 

Tags: USA, historical, visualization. 


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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 10:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 10:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps

Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps | HMHS History | Scoop.it

This data visualization project is a great way to demonstrate the geographic expansion of the United States.  This is much more interactive than the typical time lapse video since you can scroll through the maps and explore each map through the interactive features. 

 

Tags: historical, USA, visualization, mapping.


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Matthew Jones's comment, November 5, 2012 11:20 AM
This is a great. Definitely a great tool for students in various different levels of school that can show you the evolution of the United States over a period of time. Very cool, very useful.
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:24 AM
I really like the display of these changes in our country throughout the years. It's a great way of showing centuries of change into something easy to understand. This would help young students in a social studies class for sure.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:35 PM
i LOVE THIS! I can see this being such a valuable tool to use in a classroom. Students get the visual and written representation. Having the visual changes that took place in the United States is a better way to present to the students instead of them just reading a book. Will definitely save this article for future reference.